David Bowie: Too Cool / Not Cool for School?

Graduated from high school in 1990, and was absoutely in awe of the man from about junior year 'til… well, he’s still among my all-time favorites. He didn’t seem to be on the radar of anyone else in my school.

Another good Bowie movie is Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, about British and American soldiers in a Japanese POW camp. Kind of interesting in that it has Bowie opposite another musician (composer Ryuichi Sakamoto) in completely non-musical roles. Also stars a much less famous “Beat” Takeshi Kitano.

He never shoulda left Mick Ronson.

sigh No mention about his duet with Bing Crosby on “The Little Drummer Boy (Peace On Earth)”…

Who’s Bing Crosby? :smiley:

Just. wow.

Gawd. I teared up. What a beautiful song/cover. :slight_smile:

link

Graduated in 1990 and with my small group of friends thought he was GOD-- was introduced to the good stuff by my very cool bio teacher. Wasn’t into the 80s stuff so much then, but very into albumns like Low, for some reason. Didn’t hear Ziggy Stardust until college (hey, I grew up on an island and we took what we could get). Ashes to Ashes was the tweakiest video any of us had ever seen at that time.

In about 1996 a friend from college who lived in the same town was working at a country radio station (she’d been a mass comm major and got trapped at this place). Near the end of work, at my low-paying no fun crap job, she calls up and says “Hey, wanna go to the Bowie show.” “No way, I’m totally broke.” “But. . . I have FREE TICKETS!”
Seems noone else at her radio station had any interest in the promotional tickets. Woot!
So we went and it was swell and he did a couple of duets with Trent Reznor (NIN had opened-- Bowie’s take on Hurt was interesting-- a very nice duet). Bowie played Man who Sold the World and of course all the Nirvana-loving normal young people recognized it and went wild. “Thank you, thank you. . . I’m glad you liked that; that’s a song I wrote in 1970. . .” A hoot of a show.

And of course we know the damn Bing Crosby thing. Most likely thing to make me cry in December as I channel-surf.

My senior year of college, 1980-1981, I lived alone and remember how when I would awake at 4:00 A.M., spark the weed, put on The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, and listen to it all the way through, it was a profoundly mystical experience.

Oh no love, you’re not alone!
(“Rock-‘n’-Roll Suicide”)

Bowie was the ultimate rock romantic. He lifted that line directly from Marlene Dietrich as an hommage. He gender-bended just like her, in the complementary direction. The title of the album was a nod to Kurt Weill’s musical play The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny. Bowie was already down with Weimar decadence years before he went to live in Berlin. The song “Heroes” was the full blooming of his German romantic side begun with Ziggy.

I just wanted to chime in here and state that “Ziggy” is one of my top 10 albums of all time. I’m not a huge Bowie fan, but this album is simply fantastic.

“I could fall asleep at night as a rock and roll star…”

I love Ziggy, and a lot of Bowie’s songs, but I’m not really a huge fan. I did make a point of catching the Glass Spider tour–but only because Peter Frampton was in the band.

Bowie was my hero as a teeny teen through mid-twenties. I was 11 when Ziggy Stardust came out, and was very taken with him. He wore those skinny-legged getups so wonderfully, and was the epitome of theatrical cool out-there rock!

I remember glittering up some chunky-soled oxford saddle shoes popular back inna day; one withe David, other with Bowie, in glitter, on the toes. Most of the other kids thought that was Weird, but David Cassidy was the teeny bop of choice to most. Bleah…

By the time I was of an age to get to Bowie concerts, it was the Scary Monsters era, and saw him play a couple times, with Adrian Belew doing some amazing guitar.Loved the reformed King Crimson of Belew/Fripp then, Eno, too.

My experience was that there weren’t a whole lot of young gals into those musicians then, so most of my compadre fans were rather androgynous guys, and I was a rather androgynous girl.

Still have just about every Bowie album made, and lots of collector stuff, but to tell the truth, haven’t listened to them in 15 years. He sure helped me stretch out my mind when young, though, and I really admire him for his chameleon theatrics. And them skinny legs.

Did anybody see Bowie as the musical guest on Saturday Night Live back in 1979? He appeared with black-lipsticked Klaus Nomi as one of his backup singers.

For his first song, “The Man Who Sold the World,” Bowie had to be carried up to the mike by his backup singers. He was encased in a stiff cylindrical costume that did not allow him to walk. By doing this he was emulating Hugo Ball, a poet who appeared at the original outburst of Dada at the Cabaret Voltaire in Zürich back in 1916. BLAGO BOOM

When he did “TVC15,” Bowie wore a severely cut dress that resembled a World War II British servicewoman’s uniform.

Hey, I want the dress that Bowie wore on the cover of The Man Who Sold the World! It’s absolutely gorgeous.

I’ve told you about my artist friend Bill during my flaming, irresponsible youth. He did a series of drawings about “The Unusual Professor Siegfried,” a Eurotrash débauché in a black leather trenchcoat, holding a cigarette over his palm, an oddly soft and inviting look in his eyes. “Professor Siegfried’s Mystic Red Ball” was a nude woman copied from a porno magazine, bound and gagged. “Professor Siegfried’s Wonderful Cosmic Guru” was a sensitively rendered portrait of Bowie copied directly from Aladdin Sane. I don’t know why I just told you that.

At Disney World in the summer of 1976 they had a Bicentennial theatrical… uh… presentation that included android presidents of the U.S. and half-life-size puppets of Elton John at his toy piano and “Bowie” all in white, performing their songs. The Who joked about selling out; but Elton and Bowie… and Disney… ugh

Thank you both so much for listening to it. It means a lot to me that Bowie fans like it. I’m so glad we were there to record it. Bowie was a huge influence on her, so she dearly loves that song. She sang it as a fan, not as just a cover she felt like doing that night.

[QUOTE=Johanna]
Did anybody see Bowie as the musical guest on Saturday Night Live back in 1979? He appeared with black-lipsticked Klaus Nomi as one of his backup singers.

For his first song, “The Man Who Sold the World,” Bowie had to be carried up to the mike by his backup singers. He was encased in a stiff cylindrical costume that did not allow him to walk. By doing this he was emulating Hugo Ball, a poet who appeared at the original outburst of Dada at the Cabaret Voltaire in Zürich back in 1916. BLAGO BOOM

Thankyouthankyouthankyou. I always wondered what the hell that was tickling the edges of my memory. I would have been 9 and saw this weird dude singing this song when I sneaked into the living room after bedtime to watch SNL.

Years later I thought it was Bowie but nobody I talked to ever had the faintest idea of what I was talking about.

Around 89 or 90 I went to see his tour alone. Not many of my friends were fans at the time. A nice tight show with minimum flash and glitter. The anti-glass spider tour I’m told by those who saw both. I loved it.

Hey thats my favourite song! I consider Bowie to be the best singer of all time, I don’t have a rational reason - there are other singers that put out songs with equally good lyrics and music. But I was sitting in my dorm room once thinking that I needed a favourite singer, then Space Oddity came on and I knew music wasn’t gonna get too much more imagination capturing than that for me.