First same-sex marriage in Canadian military

As reported by the Globe and Mail.

Well, good for them.

Not to take away from the joyous occasion, but I have a serious question. Do they have rules about fraternization? Down here fraternization is a punishable offense.

As wolfstu mentioned in the previous thread, there have been members of the Canadian Forces before who have married their same-sex partners; this is believed to be the first one to be carried out on a Forces base.

Actually, that’s a good question. I have no idea. I’m digging through the Canadian Forces’ site ( http://www.forces.gc.ca/ ) but I haven’t seen anything so far.

Most likely, even if not exactly the same – there’s only so far you can bend chain-of-command discipline no matter what the army.

But just as likely, they’re probably enforced about as affectively as ours are.

matt, which previous thread?

The pit thread about the ex-gay camp.

More to the point, here’s a link to the thread I started about the previous wedding back in April 2004. (An Officer Cadet at the Royal Military College in Kingston eloped to Toronto with his fellow.)

Airman: A Google search on ‘canadian military law fraternization’ returned this document

Also, I did some checking on the UCMJ (here )and found this:

(bolding mine)

And this:

This indicates to me quite a bit of wiggle room. For example, if I as an Airman First Class started dating a Second Lieutentant who works in the hospital; I fail to see how it would compromise the chain of command, result in the appearance of partiality, or undermine good order, discipline, authority, or morale.

Of course, I could be wrong. Military law, like any law, is all in the enforcement.

Congratulations to the couple.

If fraternization is in fact illegal? Then I suppose that all of the couples I know within the Canadian military aren’t legal.

Ginger: Technically, fraternization is only between officers and enlisted. There are prohibitions on relationships between enlisted and enlisted, but only if it causes problems. To give a real-life example: We recently got a married couple in our squadron. They got married in tech school. Nobody objected in tech school because they were in different classes, and they are in seperate shops here. No problems.

The big problem with fraternization is if it causes problems in the workplace due to preferential treatment. It’s much like the civilian world: If word got out in the company you work for that you were screwing your boss, and you got promoted over someone else or let off the hook for a mistake; your co-workers would be less than thrilled.

I’m not too familiar with the ranks, but doesn’t that sound as if one is army and the other is navy, and both at about the same level?

Maybe RickJay could come by and clarify the ranks.

Party on!

Northern Piper, unless the media have misreported the ranks (which is always a fair possibility), both individuals are in the Army; a Warrant Officer in the Navy would be called a Petty Officer.

Both individuals are NCOs: Non-Commissioned Officers, with possibly several grades of rank between them (article doesn’t specify what level of Warrant Officer the one man is).

http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/Community/Insignia/arma_e.htm

They’ve got a lot of challenges ahead; I wish them well.

Oops! Meant to say that they could be Air Force or Army, as the rank structure is the same for both; Navy is the odd one out, retaining the “Petty Officer” title.

As you were!

Northern Piper: According to this site, it looks like Warrant Officer and Sergeant are both enlisted ranks in the Canadian Army.

“Petty Officer” is a rank in the navy.

The last unit I served in here in the US, the senior enlisted guy was married to the person who was, more or less, the second most senior enlisted person. There’s a lot of wiggle room.

It was always my observation that it’s fraternization if you’re just dating and fooling around, but if you go and get hitched, the military tries to just deal with it.

Anyway, this is too cool! So do these guys get all the same benefits a straight married couple gets?

What about when a military member gets married to a civilian? Do they get the same benefits?

Geez, compared to the US, this just seems like some surreal sci-fi story about the distant future.

Go Canada! Huge smooches and hugs for each and every one of you!

Yes, and yes.

One day, same-sex marriage will be referred to simply as ‘marriage’. That’s all it is in the eyes of the Canadian federal government. These guys are married to federal employees, and as such receive the same benefits and rights as are given to spouses of other federal employees.

Thanks for the clarification, Rodd and Tentacle Monster.

psst - fellow Canucks - I don’t think we should tell our merkin buddies about our anti-grav sleds or death-rays just yet, right?

Warrant Officer is the Army and Air Force enlisted rank above Sergeant.

It goes Private, Corporal, Master Corporal, Sergeant, Warrant Officer, Master Warrant Officer, Chief Warrant Officer. Then you get into commissioned officers.