gravity reduction beam

A while ago I read about a scientist who demonstrated an ability to decrease the effect of gravity with a spinning supercooled disc. Basically everything above the disc within its diameter in a beam seemed to “weigh less”. As I remember it, they could not find an upper limit or measure the speed of the effect.

Anyone else read about this or know about it? Id site but I dont remember where I saw it.
The implication was for space travel. Basically you could put one of these spinning disks under a rocket, and thus decrease the amount of fuel required for it to exit gravity. Of course, mounting something like this under a car would drastically decrease the drag, thus decreasing the fuel required to propel said vehicle.

Just curious. Mabey Exxon buried it along with every other effective fuel saving device.

Drag on a car is from the air. Car’s are propelled by their friction with the ground, reduction the gravity would be counterproductive.

Ah, yes, the Podkletnov gravity-blocking superconducting disc, useful for moving pendulums, redirecting smoke, and presumably knocking flying saucers out of the sky as seen in Earth Vs. The Flying Saucers. What it can’t seem to do is produce a reliable, reproducible result, or a coherent theory that integrates gravity with electromagnetism. But those are quibbling details.

Exxon, no doubt, has stashed plans for this in the same enormous, crate-filled warehouse where they’ve ensconced the Fish carburator, the water-powered internal combustion engine, and the Ark of the Covenant. (What, you thought the U.S. Army was behind that?) It’s a good thing, too, 'cause an easily reproduced gravitational polarizer/shield would destroy our economy and send the energy companies into a death spiral.

Meanwhile, the NSA continues to stalk Art Bell. Trust no one.

Stranger

ok ok…uncle already…

There is a man in India who received a U.S. Patent for an Anti Gravity Machine.

I believe this may be the man you speak of…

IndiANa, dude…

I once saw a demonstration of one of these “anti-gravity” machines. It was not too impressive.

For one thing, it needed a constant stream of salt water, which the inventor supplied by running a tube from the machine into the ocean below. So the upshot was that the thing could hover for hours as long as it was no more than 10 or 15 feet above calm ocean water. But it could not go high, it could not go on land, and turbulence in the water could mess it up.

Also, the “anti-gravity device” was just that and nothing more. So a secondary device (which used gasoline) was necessary to actually propel the thing around. So you couldn’t get too far, and anyway, why not just use a boat?

Anti-gravity devices have been around for a long time: balloons, blimps, airplanes, rockets…