Herbalife Nutrition Clubs: anyone owned or patronized one?

I thought that Herbalife had largely died with its founder around 2000, but that wasn’t the case. I’ve been watching a doco on Netflix called “Betting On Zero”, and they’re talking a lot about these “clubs”, which according to this movie were usually holes in the wall in strip malls or rural downtown areas, and people could go in and get a yummy, nutritious shake (without knowing how much they would pay for it, of course) and hang out with their friends. Windows were required to be covered, so people couldn’t see the decor from the outside, and advertising was not permitted beyond a business sign, but people were supposed to show up en masse anyway.

http://bettingonzeromovie.com/

I had never heard of this concept, and as could be imagined, they almost always went belly-up as soon as the money ran out.

JC Penney’s was in serious trouble a few years ago because of some bad business decisions; I had heard that it was taken over by a financier who didn’t have retail management experience. A passing mention made me realize that the Wall Street titan who was trying to expose Herbalife was indeed this person.

I knew the company still existed to some degree, because I’ve seen products here and there in recent years.

So, has anyone here ever seen one (that you know of) or been to one?

BTW, feel free to move this to Cafe Society if you think it fits in better there.

[Moderating]
I’m not seeing much about the arts, here (I have no idea whether their shakes count as “cuisine”, but it sounds like the bizarre business model is more relevant than the shakes themselves), but it is asking for individual experiences, so IMHO is a better fit than GQ.

One thing a former Nutrition Club owner pointed out is that the shakes are intended as a meal replacement, which goes against adult human biology. I’ve definitely heard of people using things like Slim-Fast as a health weight-gaining aid, drunk WITH a meal.

This guy didn’t lose his collateral, because he turned out to be an astute businessman, and converted his NC storefronts into vape shops. They’re called Juicy’s and he now has a couple dozen of them in Oklahoma and Kansas. He said, “I used to help people lose weight; now, I help them quit smoking.” Other stories were nowhere near as positive.