Invisible Fence?

You know, those electronic things to keep your dog from leaving the yard – do they work very well, or what? What’s the SD, people?

I prefer the good old wooden fence, but I know at least a dozen people who have them and they work quite well.

Note a few things though.

  1. It is kind of painful to see at first since they do get shocked and they don’t like it much.

  2. Dogs may be smart but they ain’t geniuses. Most dogs will still occasionally forget about the fence and go get themselves shocked.

  3. If the dog gets excited enough and runs through they will usually do so without noticing the shock at all. One person I know had a real problem with this. Namely, their dog loved chasing cats so much that it would run right through the fence to get at one. For another dog it would get shocked and come back, but not for cats.


What more could you expect from somebody who lets people kick him to the head?

I’ve known a couple of people with electronic fencing and they all agreed it was a waste of their money. From what I understand about it is after the system is installed, you have to train your dog to stay in the yard. The shock was just a reminder to stop the dog.

One reason was that one guys dog - large breed - though he stayed in the yard, LIKED to lay on the barrier line to feel the zapping ( at the highest level) course through his neck. I said he should have named his dog, " Uncle Fester."

I think EF works well on smaller breeds.

A guy that I met who trains Leader Dogs recommended a choke collar with the prongs on it and take your dog to the perimeter with a 2nd person who continuously calls them. Yank back HARD ( one good yank is worth 20 weak ass ones) every time the dog tries to cross the perimeter. It usually takes less than a week of 5-10 minute sessions to get the dog to understand where he is suppose to be.
This works pretty good for our dog, except when she gets on a scent of whatever ran through the yard last, then she follows it and is gone from anywhere from a half hour to two hours. She never leaves the " property" the ten acres - with four houses on them. and all she really wants to do is sniff the woodchuck dens. She always comes back home.

[[I prefer the good old wooden fence, but I know at least a dozen people who have them and they work quite well.]] Glitch
Yeah, but the dog in question has been very ingenius and determined about thwarting conventional methods of containment.
[[3) If the dog gets excited enough and runs through they will usually do so without noticing the shock at all. One person I know had a real problem with this. Namely, their dog loved chasing cats so much that it would run right through the fence to get at one. For another dog it would get shocked and come back, but not for cats.]]
This (not the cats part, but the running fast through the zone part) is what I’m converned about. He’s also a husky mix, and I understand that they are a bit thicker in the shock zone.

My aunt and uncle discovered the real problem with the electronic fence.

It wasn’t their dogs. It was the stupid mutt next door (a brainless Chihuahua) that thought he was king of the world, and, without a collar for the shock, decided to charge across the space and attack one of their pets.

The dog didn’t survive the first bite. Chihuahua’s really are bite-sized.

You can keep your dogs in … but can you keep everything else out? My thought in your case is maybe to combine the two fencing systems to try to foil your canine Houdini.

What little experience I have with invisible fencing is this:

When landscaping a woman’s house, she had little flags used to line off where the fencing was. After planting a bunch of perennials and having her insane dog run through them for the -nth time, we took a few of the flags and placed one of each corner of the flower bed. The dog never came near the plants again as long as we were there.

If I was a meaner person, I’d of tried tossing a flag at the dog to see its reaction, but it was in reality a pretty cool dog and besides, I had work to do. The upshot was that the dog understood “flags = shock”


“I guess it is possible for one person to make a difference, although most of the time they probably shouldn’t.”

The only person I know who tried the electric fence didn’t have much luck. The dog would brave the shock if there was something sufficiently interesting for him to chase - could be a squirrel, could be a leaf - but then he’d be afraid to come back into the yard.

I, too, have been considering electronic fencing, as my puppy is getting older and bolder. I’ve talked with four people who have electronic fences…three of whom have regular fences with electronic additions for the dogs. The three with the regular fences and the electronic fences all have nothing but praise for the electronic fences. The one with the collars and the invisible fences reports that the flags are what keep her 3 dogs (all Chocolate labradors…in fact, all dog owners mentioned here have Labs) inside her property line.

This is the first time I’ve heard otherwise, but if there’s a chihuahua, I guess there’s a way. :smiley:


“There will always be somebody who’s never read a book who’ll know twice what you know.” - D.Duchovny