IP address conflict question

Hi,
I work with computers however I know close to nothing about the networking aspect. What I thought I knew was that a wireless connection for a laptop could never interfere with a LAN-only connection to a different laptop. But apparently I’m wrong about this.

I own a Toshiba Satellite back from some time in 2005/6? (M35X) my wife owns a Toshiba Satellite also ( would say first made in 2009) both laptops use Atheros in their Wi-FI connection - I thought this was the problem, so for that theory and the fact that I wanted N connection capability I purchased a Belkin add-on card for my PCMCIA card slot and disabled my on-board WI-FI -I used this Belkin card without fail for quite some time -until the day came when I started getting IP conflict balloons in my XP tray… it got to be so annoying that I decided to just park my laptop and use it more like a desktop and plug in via LAN connection (it’s faster anyway) yet every-so-often the same plague follows me even to this connection with all other wireless disabled…

I can do a repair and flush the DNS cache etc etc and I have my connection back, but for only something like 30 seconds to a minute before the same damn IP conflict balloon is back again and my connection drops out I’ve done enough computers to have seen this before with 2 different wireless enabled laptops, but why is this constantly happening with a hard line connection vs a wireless one?? Btw, I’m sure t has something to do with the fact that they are the same brand because the Dell wireless laptops I have work perfectly fine -still, LAN vs wireless?
Someone help please…

Do you have one router that serves both wired and wireless? If not, what is your exact configuration? Does the other laptop also get the IP conflict at the same time? Or other times? What IPs do they have? Can you put the wireless card in the other laptop? What happens? Can you wipe the router’s DHCP assignments? Are there any other devices on the network, like a game system? How close are the MAC numbers of two built-in adapters? What does the output of “ipconfig /all” look like before and after the problem (on wired and wireless)?

Or, try rebooting it.

I never had this occur with very similar configurations to yours. Sounds like someone has been playing with the settings to the notebook or the router.

I’d suggest doing a hard reset of the router (paper clip in pin hole) to wipe the current config information, updating it to the latest BIOS and then setting it up for your PCs. The Atheros card was never an issue re IP conflicts, you’ve had this munged up config setting for a long time.

All you need is the most generic settings for all units.

Here (below) is a standard generic setup procedure for a wireless notebook. You should not be doing any goofy stuff like setting static IP addresses etc or using wizard CDs to set up the router parameters. Make sure the notebooks have different logon and user names.
http://its.cocc.edu/Services/Wireless/Guides/WindowsXP/default.aspx

Make sure none of the ethernet cables being used in your hookups are reversed cross over cables

Also most routers have an option to lock and IP address to a specific MAC address. You may even be able to assign the computer that is getting the IP conflict an address outside of the DHCP pool or at least high up enough number in the pool that it would never be reached so the router would never assign another computer that IP address therefore no conflict could occur.

Like THIS

Obviously though the MAC address on your screen would be full of numbers and letters but whoever made this image doesn’t want everyone to see their MAC.

Yip. You almost certainly have at least one computer that is set up with a static IP. You can’t have dynamic IPs and static IPs in the same address pool simultaneously without risking a problem. The wireless vs. wired thing doesn’t matter.

You should actually be able to set your DHCP pool in your router. If you set it to 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.16 and set your computer’s static IP to 192.168.0.17, there will be no risk of IP address conflict.