Looking For Time Travel Books

I recently read A Murder In Time, which has a female modern day FBI agent transported back to 19th century England & helps solve some murders despite her specialization in IT. I’d like to find additional books like this where modern day people are transported back to 1500-1800’s. Any suggestions?

The Outlander series comes immediately to mind.

“Timeline” by Crichton was a good read.

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Meeting your exact criteria but nonetheless probably not what you’re looking for would be the 1632 series.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1632_series

The obvious ones are Connie Willis’s To Say Nothing of the Dog and The Doomsday Book. The first is sort of a mystery and involves travel back to the 19th century. It’s lighthearted and very funny.

The second takes place in the same universe and involves travel to the time just before the bubonic plague hit in England. It is not lighthearted and funny.

To Say Nothing Of The Dog — oops, ninja’d!

Jack Finney. Time and Again

https://www.amazon.com/Time-Again-Jack-Finney/dp/0684801051/

One of my favorite books is “If I Never Get Back” by Daryl Brock. A modern-day reporter travels back in time to hang out with one of the first professional baseball teams in 1869. It’s historical fiction as all the players are real. He also hangs out with Mark Twain.

Erm…must love sports.

Robert Aspirin/Linda Evans - The Time Scout books.

Poul Anderson - Time Patrol

Not quite what the OP is asking for, but excellent anyway. And of course there is always Eric Flint’s 163X universe.

Willis’s duology Blackout/All Clear is extremely good. There’s a lot in Blackout that is annoying and frustrating, but when you get to All Clear, realize there was a reason for it all.

It’s one of several books Willis has written about time travel to London during the Blitz.

TY all for the suggestions.

To be a little more specific, I’m not into scifi per se. I’m also not looking for someone to be zipping around multiple time periods. More of going back to one particular time (voluntary or not) & how they relate to/deal with life in that era.

You might try “The Eyre Affair” by Jasper Fforde. I’m not sure it exactly fits the requirements of the OP, but I’d call it close enough, and it’s a fun and entertaining read.

Do you like romance? “Outlander” series, already mentioned, is very popular. Lynn Kurland’s books are almost all time travel romance.

Can you specify genres that you like - that would help.

Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

In that case, you might actually like The Doomsday Book. It starts out as intentional/sci-fi-type time travel, but things go wrong, and it’s mostly about how the main character deals with the fact that she may have to live (or die) in the past. It’s grim, in a lot of ways, but the author’s take on the ways that we might be both similar and different to people living in the 14th century are interesting.

Replay by Ken Grimwood.

A man dies of a heart attack at his desk, then wakes up back in college, but with all his memories of his life intact.

While “Replay” is a spectacular work, it doesn’t meet the OP’s criteria.

The Anubis Gates, Tim Powers
The Big Time, Fritz Leiber

The 1632 series has already been mentioned above. I takes a West Virginia town circa 2000 and transplants it (The only SF part of the story) to Central Germany in June 1631, smack in the middle of the 30 Years War. Outside of that, everything is played reasonably straight with no real SF, just what a town of 3,500 people would have in the year 2000 (you might disagree with some of the changes the author postulates, but YMMV).

I’d suggest reading the first book, ***1632 ***by Eric Flint. It can be read as a stand-alone novel if you decide it is not worth pursuing, but they are up to about 15 novels (counting spin-offs) and quite literally hundreds of stories, so if you get hooked, it might take awhile…

Yeah, I can’t figure out why people like that book, unless they just ignore everything that happens in the present. I guess the part in the past is decent historical fiction, but the part in the present is the worst sci-fi I’ve ever read.