My hospital has droids?

I’m enjoying my lovely stay at the hospital awaiting my gallblader removal. There is a box that drives by on occasion. I haven’t gotten a good look at it yet. It drives by all by itself. It’s dressed up for Christmas with a wreath on it. I at first attributed to the pain meds but a visitor confirmed there is indeed a droid roaming the halls. Has anyone seen this before? What’s it’s job?

There’s one at my hospital that toodles around between a couple of labs in the building. People put in samples to be processed at the other lab, and it will buzz along, verbally warning of its presence as it reaches a corner, and making verbal announcements when it reaches a dropoff station.

Found it. http://concord.patch.com/articles/robot-added-to-emerson-hospital-staff I for one welcome our new robot overlords.

You don’t want a meatbag doctor installing a mechanical hand after a light saber accident now, do ya?

Never turn your back on a hospital robot. They are evil.

Holy moly! This is the first I’ve heard of robot doctors!

When I was a kid back in the 70s, my dad worked at Texas Instruments in Austin. They had a box-like droid that delivered mail.

When my GF was in the hospital to get her appendix out 2 years ago, I saw a lot of these things. It delivers meds from the pharmacy and other supplies.

Wouldn’t it be cool if they made the droids in the shape of Daleks?
(yeah, well, okay… I know there’s a downside to this idea: the royalties to the BBC would be too expensive. )

“MEDICATE!”

(Somebody had to say it! :wink: )

DO NOT RESUSITATE!!!

I saw these too last year when my grandmother was in hospital. I wanted to kick it most of the time. It looked like and was called R2D2.

It isn’t the droid you’re looking for.

Move along.

No way that droids delivering my Dilaudid. I’m definitely looking for him.

Here is a robot that does surgery, most commonly prostate surgery and hysterectomies.

And other operations:smiley:

Technically not a robot. It can’t do anything on its own, a surgeon has to operate the controls.

Incidentally, one of the hospitals I work at has one or two, and the company did a demo of the unit for the public and I got to try it out. It’s a lot of fun, and I did pretty good at the challenges. Definitely a case where years of video gaming have paid off. :smiley:

IBM in Northern Virginia did too, my aunt worked there.

I can only assume the purpose of the machine you are describing is to create a sense of normalcy, a homey feeling, to help the patient handle psychoactive medications and life threatening experiences without losing confidence in his awareness and senses.