New York hand Jobs only £4.95

All I know is that you don’t want the hot wax

I believe a New York hand job is when you ask a hooker for a hand job, and she tells you to go fuck yourself.

you sneaky BASTARD! Well played :wink:

I agree tho, that IS a good price for either.

Cumulative time I’ve spent in the UK, all at Heathrow: 150 minutes;
Value of UK coinage accumulated during that time: £4, and what the hell is a pence?

It’s what you build around your pield to keep your sheef from efcaping.

I have come across exactly one bank that would exchange foreign coins, and that was the BNZ in central Christchurch- and they’d only handle Australian and Candian $1 & $2 coins, and UK ₤1 coins.

All those American pennies, French Centimes, and Mexican Centavos that people picked up were still effectively souvenirs once they got home, though- no-one would change them, and I’ve never found a bank outside the issuing country that would touch them.

£4.95, $10.00 – why am I always on the other side of Manhattan when the Red Light Special is announced?

Time was it was 41st Street between 11th and West Side Highway. That was when Koch was in office.

Now, post-Guiliani? Not so much…

You owe me a new keyboard! :smiley:

all I can think of to add is “£4.95, Father, same as in town”

escafing

In the dark of an alley you’d work for a five
For a swift one off the wrist down on the old main drag

Fiss.

Pence is the plural of penny as used in Merrie England

One penny, two pence.

There are the plebs who say: one pee, two pee etc.

80% of a handjob in Manchester? hell Annie I’m sure we would give you one for free, well I would but that’s just me, generous to a fault :smiley:

And let me chime in to add that “pence” refers to a sum of money, whereas if you’re talking about a number of coins you say “pennies”. I have eighty pence = I have some unspecified quantity of coinage totalling £0.80; I have eighty pennies = I have fourscore coins each valued at £0.01.

Far too many people say “one pence” or “a one pence piece”. It’s a barbarism that dates back to 1971 when we changed from £sd to decimal coinage. People adopted a kinda stilted phrasing to make it clear that they were talking about “new pennies” (or “new pence”) and it’s stuck. The coins did actually say “new pence” for some years (“new penny” for the 1p coin), they now just say “penny” or “pence”. This was largely because the old coinage was still legal tender for a while, being phased out gradually; any multiple of 6d (six old pence) had an exact equivalent in the new (2.5p - there was a 1/2p coin until the early 1980s) so the coins could be used side by side.

If you remember back in the dark ages there were some small shopkeepers that refused to deal in new money, I certainly do.

There was a small hardware store close to where I used to live and the old guy that owned it would not take new money…he went bust after about 6 months :frowning:

I remember reading stories in the paper, certainly. But more fool him, I mean, I wasn’t yet eleven when the currency changed and I understood it perfectly even without the Scaffold’s helpful “Decimal Five” public-information broadcasts.

It looks illogical to have switched to decimal currency and yet had a £0.005 unit (the 1/2p), but people who don’t know should understand that the old 1d (pre-decimal penny) still had useful buying power at that time even though there were 240 of them to the pound. Fortunately (?) the 1970s economy soon put paid to that. Still, I liked our old currency and was sorry to see it go, not least for the associated slang, I mean, ask a young lass these days to get her thrupennies out and what do you get?

()() these if very young

(.)(.) these if older

There Is Nothing Like a Dame !

Converting a country to metric is always a bitch! Thanks for the decipherage.

Oops. Quoted the wrong post. :stuck_out_tongue: