North Koreans Have No Dongs

It says so right here.

But the Vietnamese do.

Well, North Koreans do have dongs. In Korean, a dong is an urban sub-district or neighborhood. In South Korea, my last address building 144-1 in the Banpo-4 neighborhood of the Seocho district in Seoul, so my address in Korean was

Seoul
Seocho-gu
144-1 Banpo-4 dong.

North Korean addresses are similar.

And of course, when you get to more rural addresses, you come across suffixes like -ri and -bong.

Can I say “So do you live in a big dong?”?

And if there’s an earthquake is it a ding dong?

When my wife was a little girl on Korea, she’d say “Mom, I gotta go dong.” When our daughter was slow to toilet-train, she’d berate her for wearing a full diaper as being a “dong-sicie,” or “shit-dog”

Either its pronounced differently enough to be significant to Korean ears, or Gobear’s cite means that neighborhoods are based on their placement along the sewer system insead of the street grid.

Somehow I can’t find it in my heart to sympathize with either side in the blown missle deal. One out-crooked the other.

Well, I’ve heard that, too, and I always figured it was just onomatopeiac babytalk, like ssi for urination, which is analogous to " go wee-wee."

Just as a hijack, the Korean language borrowed an estimated 60 percent of its vocabulary from Chinese, but unlike chinese, Korean has no tones, so now Korean has an enormous number of homophonic words. Looking at my handy Minjungseorim Han-Yong dictionary, I see for dong (long-o):
a bundle

the same

east

a dam

a neighborhood

armor

copper

And there are even longer words that sound the same but have different meanings, like donggam, which can mean “the same feeling” or “the same age.”

Generally, Koreans can tell the meaning from context or from the hanja (Chinese character) in a magazine or newspaper, which is why that even though Korean has an alphabet (hangul, an artificial alphabet created by Korean scholars in 1446 under the direction of King Sejong the Great) and does not require hanja, the Ministry of Education mandates that Korean students know 1800 characters by the end of high school.

In addition, unlike English, Korean uses two separate letters to distinguish the long-o and short-o sounds. Korean pronounciation makes itr very difficult for neophyte learners of Korean to tell the two sounds apart, for example dohng and duhng, although native Korean speakers have no difficulty doing so. Almost every magazine and newspaper uses hanja, except for the left-leaning Hangyoreh Shinmun, in sympathy with the xenophobic, nativist North, which has replaced most foreign loan words with vocabulary of purely Korean extraction.

Well, I’ve heard that, too, and I always figured it was just onomatopeiac babytalk, like ssi for urination, which is analogous to " go wee-wee."

Just as a hijack, the Korean language borrowed an estimated 60 percent of its vocabulary from Chinese, but unlike chinese, Korean has no tones, so now Korean has an enormous number of homophonic words. Looking at my handy Minjungseorim Han-Yong dictionary, I see for dong (long-o):
a bundle

the same

east

a dam

a neighborhood

armor

copper

And there are even longer words that sound the same but have different meanings, like donggam, which can mean “the same feeling” or “the same age.”

Generally, Koreans can tell the meaning from context or from the hanja (Chinese character) in a magazine or newspaper, which is why that even though Korean has an alphabet (hangul, an artificial alphabet created by Korean scholars in 1446 under the direction of King Sejong the Great) and does not require hanja, the Ministry of Education mandates that Korean students know 1800 characters by the end of high school.

In addition, unlike English, Korean uses two separate letters to distinguish the long-o and short-o sounds. Korean pronounciation makes itr very difficult for neophyte learners of Korean to tell the two sounds apart, for example dohng and duhng, although native Korean speakers have no difficulty doing so.

Bwahahahahaha! Heavy on the irony sauce. Who says there’s honor amongst thieves?

We can only hope that this bit of chicanery will discourage other nations from missile buys involving North Korea.

[points at Saddam]

Whadda a maroon!!!

Actually, the Korean word for neighborhood is “dong” (spelled with a single ‘tigut’ [the letter with the d sound]). The word for shit is “ddong”; it is spelled with a saeng-tigut (a double ‘tigut’ letter, similar to the double “s” letters you see in the name Ssangyong). The ‘O’ sound in the two words is identical; same letter with the same sound.

To a Korean, the difference in pronunciation is readily apparent. To an English speaker, they sound pretty much the same…

Gobear

[slight hijack]
What is the meaning of “imnidah”? I’ve heard it pronounced as em knee dah. It’s used in just about every sentence of spoken Korean.
[kcajih thgils]

Thanks for the assist. I couldn’t find it in my dictionary with the single tigut–I should have thought of the double letter–chonun wang pabo imnida.

It just means “is” by itself (though there are two forms of “is” which have different meanings), but the -mnida verb ending is standard to indicate a polite level of discourse, as in kamsa hamnida (thank you) or kamnida (go). It’s a formal level of politeness used between equals. There are other levels, but they should be used with extreme caution by the non-native speaker.

What’s brown, and sounds like a bell?

Dong.

Hey waiter, how many dongs do we have to whip out before we get served?