Obamacare

Five year on from its introduction, is it fair to say that this was a scandalous disaster?

Nope.

It worked exactly as intended, americans still do not have universal healthcare.

No.

ACA insured millions of uninsured diabetics.

The only disaster is the piecemeal destruction of the Act by the coward in the White House.

Reported for forum change.

Thanks to the GOP.

No.

Well, it’s not the screaming success Trumpcare would be, if that existed, that’s for sure. But on the other hand, Trump’s wall is gorgeous. What’s that? He hasn’t done that either? Shit fire.

I was under the impression that the ACA was at least on a par with the Sestak Job Offer, Fast and Furious and the Bergdahl Swap.

A historic change in the massively complex US health insurance system — a change that, despite being shrunk and shackled from the get-go (and later moreso) by the Republicans, still helped millions of Americans get insurance, plus helping millions more through pre-existing conditions, 20-something children living with parents, and more…

…you’re comparing this to a scattered handful of minor policies or decisions that one might reasonably quibble with, but few level-headed folks would say are so serious or consequential as to be called “scandals”?

ETA: You forgot the “tan suit.” And the “Marine holding the umbrella.” Now, THOSE were scandalous!

So not rattled heh.

Yup, and the dems are doing the same thing again this time 'round. Kamala and Booker loves that big pharma $. Go see.

Lest we forget, Michelle was photographed with bare…arms.

Health"care" in america is an utterly bipartisan scandal.

Ranking 37th — Measuring the Performance of the U.S. Health Care System

**World Health Organization’s Ranking of the World’s Health Systems
**Some people fancy all health care debates to be a case of Canadian Health Care vs. American. Not so. According to the World Health Organization’s ranking of the world’s health systems, neither Canada nor the USA ranks in the top 25.

Improving the Canadian Healthcare System does not mean we must emulate the American system, but it may mean that perhaps we can learn from countries that rank better than both Canada and the USA at keeping their citizens healthy.
http://thepatientfactor.com/canadian-health-care-information/world-health-organizations-ranking-of-the-worlds-health-systems/

U.S. Health Care Ranked Worst in the Developed World
The U.S. health care system has been subject to heated debate over the past decade, but one thing that has remained consistent is the level of performance, which has been ranked as the worst among industrialized nations for the fifth time, according to the 2014 Commonwealth Fund survey 2014. The U.K. ranked best with Switzerland following a close second.
The Commonwealth Fund report compares the U.S. with 10 other nations: France, Australia, Germany, Canada, Sweden, New Zealand, Norway, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the U.K. were all judged to be superior based on various factors. These include quality of care, access to doctors and equity throughout the country. Results of the study rely on data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the World Health Organization and interviews from physicians and patients.

HOW BAD IS U.S. HEALTH CARE? AMONG HIGH-INCOME NATIONS, IT’S THE WORST, STUDY SAYS
As Republicans struggle to agree on a replacement for the Affordable Care Act, the Commonwealth Fund has rated the U.S. health care system as the worst among the 11 developed nations it analyzed as part of an evaluation conducted every three years. The think tank also rated the U.S. health care system as the worst-performing of the nations analyzed when the last evaluation was released in 2014.

How does the quality of the U.S. healthcare system compare to other countries?
Bench-marking U.S. quality measures against those of similarly large and wealthy countries is one way to assess how successful the U.S. has been at improving care for its population, and to learn from systems that often produce better outcomes. The OECD has compiled data on dozens of outcomes and process measures. Across a number of these measures, the U.S. lags behind similarly wealthy OECD countries (those that are similarly large and wealthy based on GDP and GDP per capita).In some cases, such as the rates of all-cause mortality, premature death, death amenable to healthcare, and disease burden, the U.S. is also not improving as quickly as other countries, which means the gap is growing.

A black woman can sure get under some folk’s skin.

Just some friendly advice, comrade: I wouldn’t go around these parts showing off that you’re so focused on “rattling” other posters. It could be taken the wrong way.

The charitable interpretation of your posts is this: You sound like you want to revive Occupy Wall Street (and related movements), which helped to focus attention on the inequalities built into the system, and how most Democratic leaders were not going to do much, if anything, to fundamentally change the system, so we shouldn’t put too much faith in either major US party. Fine. I actually agree, basically.

But right now we need to strip one of the major parties of its power, as soon as possible, for many reasons (shorter and longer term) — and your focus on the inequities of the system itself is just a distraction (unless you want to start a thread on that, as I suggested).

How do YOU connect these two themes? Maybe you think that the fall of Trump should be accompanied by a rise — not of the Democrats (not even as just a “temporary caretaker until we’ve gotten back to normalcy”) — but rather the rise of some THIRD option, that would fundamentally change the system?

We’d all love to see the plan! :wink:

Then can’t you just vote Democratic? Why can’t your party git-r-done?

Avoiding objective reality again to label again? Run-n-tell on me.

Health"care" in america is an utterly bipartisan scandal.

Ranking 37th — Measuring the Performance of the U.S. Health Care System

World Health Organization’s Ranking of the World’s Health Systems
Some people fancy all health care debates to be a case of Canadian Health Care vs. American. Not so. According to the World Health Organization’s ranking of the world’s health systems, neither Canada nor the USA ranks in the top 25.

Improving the Canadian Healthcare System does not mean we must emulate the American system, but it may mean that perhaps we can learn from countries that rank better than both Canada and the USA at keeping their citizens healthy.
http://thepatientfactor.com/canadian...ealth-systems/

U.S. Health Care Ranked Worst in the Developed World
The U.S. health care system has been subject to heated debate over the past decade, but one thing that has remained consistent is the level of performance, which has been ranked as the worst among industrialized nations for the fifth time, according to the 2014 Commonwealth Fund survey 2014. The U.K. ranked best with Switzerland following a close second.
The Commonwealth Fund report compares the U.S. with 10 other nations: France, Australia, Germany, Canada, Sweden, New Zealand, Norway, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the U.K. were all judged to be superior based on various factors. These include quality of care, access to doctors and equity throughout the country. Results of the study rely on data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the World Health Organization and interviews from physicians and patients.
http://time.com/2888403/u-s-health-c...veloped-world/

HOW BAD IS U.S. HEALTH CARE? AMONG HIGH-INCOME NATIONS, IT’S THE WORST, STUDY SAYS
As Republicans struggle to agree on a replacement for the Affordable Care Act, the Commonwealth Fund has rated the U.S. health care system as the worst among the 11 developed nations it analyzed as part of an evaluation conducted every three years. The think tank also rated the U.S. health care system as the worst-performing of the nations analyzed when the last evaluation was released in 2014.

How does the quality of the U.S. healthcare system compare to other countries?
Bench-marking U.S. quality measures against those of similarly large and wealthy countries is one way to assess how successful the U.S. has been at improving care for its population, and to learn from systems that often produce better outcomes. The OECD has compiled data on dozens of outcomes and process measures. Across a number of these measures, the U.S. lags behind similarly wealthy OECD countries (those that are similarly large and wealthy based on GDP and GDP per capita).In some cases, such as the rates of all-cause mortality, premature death, death amenable to healthcare, and disease burden, the U.S. is also not improving as quickly as other countries, which means the gap is growing.

Depends.

It was a tepid half measure promoted by (for lack of a nicer word) cowardly democrats who were terrified to make anyone angry. They watered it down so republicans, fox news, pharma, the insurance industry, hospitals and the AMA wouldn’t be mad at them. All they accomplished was the rich and republicans were mad at them anyway, but now their base was too demoralized to bother to vote for them in 2010.

But it did help about 20 million people gain insurance. yeah for some of them, its shit insurance. Is someone spending 9% of their gross, pre tax income on a plan with a $5000 deductible, no out of network coverage and tons of exclusions and exceptions really a ‘winner’? Not really.

It would be cheaper and easier to auto-enroll the uninsured into medicaid or medicare than to give them subsidies to buy private insurance. But that pisses off the medical industry (private insurance can’t compete with medicaid or medicare, and these programs offer lower reimbursements so less money for pharma, hospitals and doctors).

The only true path to health reform is ballot initiatives on the state level. Even in states where democrats control 60-80% of state legislature seats and the governorship, democrats refuse to push for UHC. Even UHC based on places like switzerland which isn’t single payer.

I would agree, but when VT attempted it, they discovered it would be a fiscal disaster and abandoned the effort. Excess profit is just too baked into the system to succeed piecemeal. But I see no obvious solution. Canadian medicare was put in before medical care got so expensive and has adjusted gradually. It was tried first in one province (Sask.) and was wildly successful.

Not sure why you felt the need to post this twice. Do not spam the boards posting the same thing multiple times.

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