OK, Line Up To Be The First In Your Neighborhood To Get Eyeball Studs!

Yes, you can be on the cutting edge of fashion and get a cute little metal stud implanted into your eyeball!

Here is the lovely link.

I would probably avoid having it done by a guy in a van parked in the Walmart parking lot though.

I think eyeball surgery is gross anyway, so I’m not even going to look at the link. This is almost as disturbing as people who have cosmetic amputations (and yes, they do exist).

Too stupid - no thanks, I’d prefer not to have a foreign body implanted in my eyeball and risk infection and blindness for no good reason. Sheesh.

Having previously worked in ophthalmology, I googled the doctor cited - first, it appears to be a Dr. Emil Chinn (not Emily), and not that this necessarily means anything, but the Yelp reviews for his practice are very dodgy-sounding. Dude seems to be very much a giant self-promoter and ego, and patients allege things like discounts if you upload your surgery video to YouTube (tagged with his practice’s name), hard sells, etc. Plus his firm’s website actually has a discussion of his search for a wife and a link to where you can apply or suggest a candidate! :eek:

But here’s where I really have an issue, from the discussion of the jewelry on his site: “The chance of visual loss from this procedure is 0. There is absolutely no risk of going blind, or any visual loss.”

No. Just no. No, no, no. I suspect what he means is that the actual process of implanting the jewelry will not directly or immediately cause visual loss, which is true enough (barring a terrible accident like puncturing the globe, which is still a chance), but an infection afterwards could lead to keratitis, which could quickly begin to damage the outside of the eye, that kind of thing. It’s a terrible way to describe the procedure risks, and frankly, the fact that he even does something like this (I did check his CV, and he has an impressive training background, but that doesn’t predict his judgement now) would lead me to stay far, far away from even standard procedures there.

:eek:The incision is done with SCISSORS???

Whatever happened to the good old days when merely getting a nose piercing was rebellious?

Holy shit, I haven’t reached 35 and I’m already wondering what’s happened to kids these days. whole body shudder

What’s left to pierce after this?

Eardrums
Brain
Chest cavity
Arteries
Spinal column

The hyoo-o-uh-kuh! (“The Hook” in the dialect of the fictional island-nation of San Lorenzo.)

Torture/execution device described by Vonnegut in Cat’s Cradle – Like a giant fish-hook, they impale you on it through your belly and out your back like a giant worm, and there they leave you to die, one sorry law-breaker.

Can I run a chain from my eyeball stud to my penis stud?

What is next? Branding? Scarification? This is crazy

Branding and scarification are old-school.

Hell. No.

Eh, I wouldn’t do it, I wouldn’t want anyone I knew to do it, and I would think less of someone who did get it done.

However, in the grand scheme we accept all sorts of body-mods as mundane and normal - circumcision, teeth braces, boob jobs, face-lifts, tummy tucks, liposuction, nose jobs - what’s one more body part?

That’s true enough, and there is the possibility of some serious and permanent consequences for most of those, too. A tattoo is permanent, and the removal is (apparently) extremely painful and comes with the risk of infection and eventually death if things go particularly wrong; any surgery carries a risk of death; why not risk your vision, too?

I dunno, I just can’t see it…

Well, not after the infection sets in and you lose your eyeball…:smiley:

Fraternity branding
http://www.campuscircle.com/review.cfm?r=1714

Scarification
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarification
http://thrivestudios.ca/gallery.htm?bShowGallery=1&ww_galleryID=81B30598-F530-CDA1-606E-92D86473867F

I wonder if they are removable? I think even none ferrous metals have a problem with MRI’s. Or am I wrong about that?

Do non-ferrous metals have a problem with MRIs? More to the point, do MRIs have a problem with them?

Here is something about the procedure from a decade ago. “The technique is harmless and carries no side effects, say its Dutch pioneers,” so that claim isn’t new, either.