Secret Angel

So we’ve all had someone be a secret angel for us (meaning: someone who did something nice for you without recognition…nobody knew or still knows but just you).

Have you ever been a secret angel for someone else? If so, please share what you did for that person!

Disclaimer: once you share it here, you will no longer be a secret angel but just an angel :slight_smile:
Today I had a customer of mine who bought something from me write back and told me she received more than she ordered and felt guilty and couldn’t let it go. She told me she would either return it or send me money and I told her, just for being so honest and having integrity, to just keep it and not feel guilty about it anymore!

We operated a weekend backpack lunch program at our expense for the local elementary school. At one point, we were providing weekend lunches for about 23 at-risk kids, and also providing meals during holiday breaks like Christmas, etc. The school administration knew who we were, of course, but the students and their parents never knew who we were. We bought the food, procured the backpacks, and delivered the meals to the school, where a coordinator gave them out to the kids on Fridays. Unfortunately, the principal of the school eventually became so difficult to deal with that we had to give it up after a few years.

I used to work the graveyard shift at a gas station. 3-4 times a week (I’d say, as a rough average), I’d invariably get someone come in with a handful of change to put in the tank when they were riding on fumes. I’d usually wait until they went out to pump the fuel, then slide my debit card through the register and add about $5-$6 to their amount.

I know what it’s like to run out of gas and be stranded in the middle of nowhere in the middle of the night. If I can keep someone else from having to go through that, I’m okay with it costing me a few bucks.

that’s a great share. thanks

amazing…and these kids still don’t know today?

Reminds me of these series of inspirational thai commercials. My favorite ones:

"Unsung Hero" [ภาพยนตร์โฆษณา ปี พ.ศ.2557 ] [Official TVC 2014: Thai Life Insurance] - YouTube (that’s literally my life)

[quote=“cornflakes2, post:5, topic:853817”]

amazing…and these kids still don’t know today?

Reminds me of these series of inspirational thai commercials. My favorite ones:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaWA2GbcnJU (that’s literally my life)

[/QUOTE]

There was no reason to tell them, since the goal was to feed hungry kids, not make them beholden.

My wife and I will pick up the bills for folks at restaurants. It is usually an older person eating by themselves. Watching the look on their face when they are told their meal has been paid for is worth every penny. My favorite was a young gal with her maybe 2 year old daughter. We overheard her tell her daughter she could not have chicken nuggets, they were not on the menu. Chicken nuggets were on the menu so we figured she could not afford them. We waved down a waitress and told her that when she takes the order for that table, tell them to order anything they want including chicken nuggets. The little girls got her nuggets and mom got more than a cheap appetizer for her dinner. The smile on their faces was absolutely worth it.

duplicate

[Johnny Rivers]

*Secret…Angel, man

Secret… Angel, man

He’s givin’ you a Dollar,

And takin’ away your Pain…*

[/Johnny Rivers]

Many years ago I was in my local Dunkin Donuts.

A homeless man, a really decrepit one, wandered in and walked to the counter begging for food. The young woman behind the counter, without a hint of hesitation, poured a half cup of coffee and put a small handful of donut holes in a paper napkin and gave them to him.

Her compassion in that moment impressed me. She did not act judgemental or disgusted or put out, she served him with the same pleasant demeanor as she did paying customers.

I’ve met the family that runs that franchise, they are successful immigrants and good people. I suspect that what she did was store policy.

I was going through a divorce and it was really tough. On the weekend my wife was moving out of our house, I didn’t want to be there when the moving van came and they took half our stuff, and she actually, physically left our home. So I went for a drive to nowhere, just headed into the rural, mountainous area of our state. Very sad, just me and my sad thoughts.
I stopped for a sad dinner by myself at what passed for the nicest restaurant in the area. It was pretty nice, the kind of place the locals went for a special dinner. I was eating by myself, sadly, and couldn’t help overhearing the young couple at a table next to me. They were excited to be there and talked about how they had saved up for this night. They were sweet and young and in love.
I overheard them talking about the menu and wondering what they could afford. The young man said he wanted a beer but then they couldn’t afford an appetizer for him. She said she wanted an appetizer but then that meant they couldn’t afford dessert.
They ordered that way and had a nice time with their meal. I listened and it reminded me of years ago when my wife and I were young and in love, and with not much money.
I finished as they were halfway into their meal. As I left, I went to the hostess stand and got their waitress, added the price of two of the most expensive desserts to their bill and then I paid for their meal with a generous tip. I asked the waitress to make sure they both ordered dessert and just tell them that someone took care of their bill and wished them well. I asked her not to say it had been the man sitting near them, to just say someone.
I drove off feeling a little bit better about life.

Many years ago I was in my local Dunkin Donuts.

A homeless man, a really decrepit one, wandered in and walked to the counter begging for food. The young woman behind the counter, without a hint of hesitation, poured a half cup of coffee and put a small handful of donut holes in a paper napkin and gave them to him.

Her compassion in that moment impressed me. She did not act judgemental or disgusted or put out, she served him with the same pleasant demeanor as she did paying customers.

I’ve met the family that runs that franchise, they are successful immigrants and good people. I suspect that what she did was store policy.

My nephew married fairly young and was living in California. His wife decided that she wanted to do a two year college program in Europe. He stayed in California while she studied in Europe. For Christmas break the first year, he said that they couldn’t get together because money was too tight. I looked up the costs and sent him enough for a plane ticket from California to Europe, plus a few hundred for other travel and food. Not long after he returned, the divorce proceedings started. I think that they realized that their goals were not aligned and it would be best to end it.

When I originally gave him the money, I asked him to pay me back when he was financially stable. When he got married again, I made the loan into a gift.

Not long after 9/11, I paid for lunch for a table full of cops. A silent “thank you”, if you will, for first responders everywhere.