Shakesperean Sequels

Old Willy wrote good stuff, but he wasn’t always good at capitalizing on a good idea. Our task here is to give some ideas for sequels to his plays.

[ul]
[li]Hamlet II: Hail to the King, Baby![/li][li]Hamlet II: Danish Boogaloo[/li][li]Hamlet II: Dawn of the Dead[/li][li]A Midsummer Day’s Hangover[/li][li]Even More Yadda Yadda Yadda[/li][/ul]

The Merchant of Venice II - The Outlet Mall strikes back

One Gentleman of Verona - The Early Years

Henry IV, Part ii, II: My Own Private Sussex

When Richard III Met Iago

Romeo & Juliet: Dead and Lovin’ It

The Merry Wives of Windsor On Gilligan’s Island

Octavius: The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Jr.

Shylock: The JDL Strikes Back

Banquo’s Ghost II: Nightmare on Dunsinane St.

The Winter’s Tale 2: March Madness
Much Ado About Even Less
Beyond the Tempest
Two Gentlemen of Verona and a Baby
Hamlet II: Fortinbras’s Revenge
Thirteenth Night

MacBeth II – “Another Damn Spot” wherein Lady MacBeth’s sister comes to even the score with MacDuff.

Othello II – Further Adventures of an Ill-fated Handkerchief

MacBeth II – “Another Damn Spot” wherein Lady MacBeth’s sister comes to even the score with MacDuff.

Othello II – Further Adventures of an Ill-fated Handkerchief

Ow! You made Diet Coke come out of my nose!

The Merry Wives Of Windsor was a sequal.

Shakespeare wrote it himself, at the request of Elizabeth I.

I actually saw this in a bookstore recently:

Hamlet II:Ophelia’s Revenge

Romeo & Juliet: Why the Montagues Hate the Capulets (obviously a prequel)

King Lear II: Leisure World

[semi-scholarly hijack]

More of a spinoff, actually – or at least it doesn’t exactly fit the continuity of the history plays. MWW’s relationship to 1 and 2H4 isn’t entirely clear, and probably the best course is not to worry too much about it. The intro in the Arden complete works (which sucks, btw; never buy it) suggests that if you’re really into continuity you could probably imagine it to take place after 2H4, given Falstaff’s lack of funds and the play’s lack of Prince Hal, but I think this is stupid. :wink:

(Interestingly, you’ll often find comments to the effect that MWW is Shakespeare’s only play set in Elizabethan England, although strictly speaking the presence of Falstaff and company would place it in the early 15th century. There’s also a line to the effect that Fenton, the heroine’s boyfriend, was “a companion of Poins and the wild prince,” which is sort of a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it thing but sorta cool, and probably relevant to the whole timing discussion in an offhand way.)

[/semi-scholarly hijack]

Titus Andronicus Makes Dessert

Hamlet II: Pirates of the North Sea

Richard IV: Queen Margaret’s Revenge

And I would say Love’s Labour’s Won, except I’ve always suspected there was a Love’s Labour’s Won, only Shakespeare’s maidservant used the manuscript to line the chicken cage or something. Damn her.

All’s Well That Ends Well - Or Is It?

Well, Francis Meres says there was… :wink:

Anyway, more in the spirit of this thread than my last post:

*Troilus and Cressida II: Horsing Around

Pericles II: The Bawd and Pimp Strike Back

As You Still Like It

Henry VIII, Part II: Divorced, Beheaded, Died…*

Much Ado About Everything.

Othello II - Jungle Fever

Romeo and Juliet and Romeo and Juliet: The Clone Wars

Much Ado About Everything.

Othello II - Jungle Fever

Romeo and Juliet and Romeo and Juliet: Attack of the Clones

Ignore the first, obviously… :smack:

The Merry Wives of Windsor Do Dallas
Puck 2: Back in Da Hood
Tempest 2: Ariel vs. Caliban
Julius Caesar 2: The Empire Strikes Back
H2: 2BOrNot2B
Henry IV Part 3 Section 2 Subparagraph 12
Othello 2: Full Throttle

Love’s Labours Lost…In Space

Taming of the Shrew II: Tame Harder

Thriteenth Night

Hamlet III: Die Hamlet! Die!

King Leer 2: Leer Unleased

MacBeth 2: This Time it’s Personal