Us dirty humans...

I’m curious…if men’s houses have lower bacteria counts than women’s, would that partially explain why women seem to get sick more often?

Why do you think they do “get sick more often”? Males and females contract illness at the same rate, last I noticed.

Perhaps it’s just because women are more likely to go see a doctor when they’re not feeling well. Or perhaps I have a tendency to date sickly women.

Don’t be so PC. Women are always getting sick. I think part of it has to do with the more screwy innards they have, all those hormones. I also agree they are more likely to seek treatment. It would be intesting to see stats on this.

Gee, someone’s living up to his user id. Lucifer Antichrist indeed.

Just for the record: I am a woman, I rarely get sick. The only time I have problems with hormones is when I’m on the pill. In my experience, most overly hormonal/emotional women are on the pill, and their conditions improve once they go off it.

Of my acquaintances, I would say that the guys I know actually get sick more than the women. Or maybe they just whine more. They tend to be more prone to seasonal allergies, too.

Anyway, Mr. Antichrist, you’re obviously hanging out with the wrong women. Real women are healthy.

Eris -

While my evidence is anecdotal, like yours, I have to say that in my experience women are put ON the pill when they’re asking the doctor to help them with hormonal problems, mood swings, etc. My last 3 girlfriends were all in this boat at some point (2 while I knew them) and the pill stabilized the hormonal swings, and thus the crying jags, etc. A few friends also experienced this.

I’ve never heard of mood/emotional problems on the pill that got better by going off it

[addendum: I thought I’d double check this – per our phone conversation two minutes ago, my sister, the gynecologist, says BC pills stabilize hormonal levels and are often used to control moodiness when a woman finds it unacceptable. The opposite (pill causes moodiness, no pill solves problem), she says, just doesn’t make any sense medically.

In cases where this IS nevertheless observed, she suspects a placebo effect (i.e. it’s not medicine fixing it, it’s your mind’s belief in the medicine – or lack thereof – fixing it.)]

As to the comment that women are “sick” more often due to “hormonal” issues and their ‘different plumbing,’ so to speak, I suspect if men bled from the genitals every 28 days, that it would be more than “men get sick more;” it would be “labor law mandates a 5 day vacation every 28 days…”

You know, I’ve never found a doctor who believed that the pill could make someone emotionally unstable. It took me a long time (and one trashed relationship) to realize that it MIGHT be the pill that was causing me to suddenly be neurotic, needy, introverted, and basically a pain in the ass.

I thought it was just me, too, until my sister, then other female friends, confirmed that they too had experienced this. I don’t know of anyone who found that life was easier to deal with on the pill.

I find it difficult to believe, now, that you can screw with your body’s natural hormone swings and NOT see a corresponding mood disturbance. All I know is that I deal with stress, PMS, “damn-life-sucks” episodes and so on SOOO much better when I’m not on the pill. I think that because the pill is such an easy solution to so many things, most women try their damndest to convince themselves that it’s really a good thing and, aside from preventing pregnancy, will help “regulate” your cycle which, for some reason, is considered good - I don’t get this, either - what is GOOD about medically forcing your body to be EXACTLY like the “typical” woman’s with a precise 28-day cycle? My cycle was NEVER 28 days naturally, and I strongly suspect that forcing it into that was not a good thing.

Ok, end of rant. The pill is like the sacred cow of modern medicine and still can do no wrong in most people’s eyes, and I don’t think I’m going to change anyone’s mind on this, most especially doctors, who never pay any attention to any medical opinion that’s not backed up by a degree in medicine.

[[I’ve never heard of mood/emotional problems on the pill that got better by going off it]]

More commonly, some women find some relief from PMS symptoms while using oral contraceptives. Most don’t. A few women, also, tend to experience aggravated PMS symptoms when using certain pills, especially the progesterone-based types (LoOvral, etc). If a woman has undesired side effects while on the Pill, she should first try another type before giving up altogether. It’s really a pretty safe drug to take, and a heck of a lot better than an unwanted pregnancy. As for women getting sick more often than men do, check out the statistics on heart disease and longevity.
Jill

Oh, and as for women having “screwy innards” – one word. Prostate.

My fiancee claims that the pill got rid of most PMS symptoms for her, and coupled with the fact that neither of us want kids, then I’d say it is quite the sacred cow for us at this point.

I don’t know the details on this, but I remember seeing ABC News report a few weeks ago on a study that had been done on PMS in third-world countries, and that the conclusion was basically thus: for a large percentage of women in the developed world, PMS is psychosomatic. Anybody know any specifics on the study that they could share?

jason.

comment on why a 28-day cycle is sometimes good.
I suspect (my experience is limited and anecdotal) that for most women with a fairly regular cycle, it doesn’t matter all that much whether the cycle is 25 days or 35 days or some number in between. The times when regulating a cycle becomes really important is at the extremes. I know a woman who only got a period every 4-6 monthes. There was no clear medical reason for this, but she spent a lot of time worrying about it. (At the time I knew her, her doctor was adopting the “let’s wait and see what happens” approach to treatment.) I also knew a girl of 14 who would bleed for a week, not bleed for a week, bleed the next week, etc. this was very hard on her body and her lifestyle, so her doctor put her on the pill temporarily, figuring that this would ease the transition into adulthood, and after a few monthes take her off the pill and see if her body had adapted to this new cycle.

[[I don’t know the details on this, but I remember seeing ABC News report a few weeks ago on a study that had been done on PMS in third-world countries, and that the conclusion was basically thus: for a large percentage of women in the developed world, PMS is psychosomatic. Anybody know any specifics on the study that they could share?]]

I have not seen that study, but I have seen plenty of evidence, and the majority of medical science concludes, that PMS is a real physiological condition, caused either by hormones or other brain chemistry.

<<I have not seen that study, but I have seen plenty of evidence, and the majority of medical science concludes, that PMS is a real physiological condition, caused either by hormones or other brain chemistry.>>

They said that it was real, but that fewer women actually suffered from it than was previously expected. What I can recall from the newscast was that these scientists (it wasn’t revealed what sort of scientists they were, or where they came from) went to Guatemala or somesuch place. There they interviewed numerous women who had never heard of PMS, and very few of them reported ever having had any of the symptoms. Then they showed the women a video about PMS, and nearly all of them began complaining about bloating, cramps, headaches, etc.

But I won’t stand by that as fact! The report was very spotty, at best, and my very short overview of what was probably a several-year study can be blamed on network television. I would like to know more if anybody knows where I can find information on the research in question.

[[They said that it was real, but that fewer women actually suffered from it than was previously
expected. What I can recall from the newscast was that these scientists (it wasn’t revealed what sort of scientists they were, or where they came from) went to Guatemala or somesuch place. There they interviewed numerous women who had never heard of PMS, and very few of them reported ever having had any of the symptoms. Then they showed the women a video about PMS, and nearly all of them began complaining about bloating, cramps, headaches, etc.]]

I’d have to see the documentary, but the above doesn’t prove that it’s “psychosomatic.” Especially if you tend to have poor health to begin with, the cyclical nature of these symptoms might not be recognized by the sufferer until the syndrome is pointed out to them. Many women with PMS symptoms began experiencing them before they heard of PMS.

You got a question about medical care? Ask an Actuary.

From one published source I have, the average female employee has 45% higher claim costs per year than the average male employee. Removing maternity costs, the female employees are still 29.5% higher. Now, is this because women have more “things” happen to them, or because the “things” that happen are more expensive? Men and Women go into the hospital at the same rate, but men stay longer (again, ignoring maternity). Women have more psychiatric and drug abuse claims. ER is about the same; Women have more surgery; Women have 50% more office visits and almost twice as many drugs (hmmm. May explain the additional Substance Abuse claims!). Even given the fact that men are brought up to “tough it out”, this still tells me that women get sick and injured more often then men do.


“There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics”
Benjamin Disraeli

Well, this clairly contradicts one famous law of the House Of God (by Samuel Shem):
The delivery of medical care is to do as much nothing as possible. (Well, this does not apply to healing subspecialities like surgery, only for internal med.)
In combination with the absolute fact that women have a nearly ten year higher live expectancy (86 vs. 78 years in Germany) and with the statistical data provided by you, there can be only one conclusion: Men die earlier because the have to get angry about women so often. Us ugly humans


Stefans first law of life: Dont do anything you dont like that good that nobody else performs better

Yeah! You bitches are killin’ us!!!

:::fleeing:::

Actually, married men live longer than single ones, and married women live shorter than single ones. so in essence when they con us into getting hitched, we take a few years of life in return. I’m not sure after the ring and all, if its such a good deal for us.

I would love to hear stats on PMS. I think its a combination of physical symptoms, blown out of proportion by her mind.

As for the medical claims, the fact that women tend to see a gynocologist yearly from early teens, to the fact men only do the prostate one after 40 or so is a big factor.

But anecdotally, for the record. I have observed women always getting sick, and always being medicated. Hypocondria is astronomically higher for women too. The pill has always been a calming stimulus to PMS, in my variety of experiences. Holy grail it is.


The facts expressed here belong to everybody, the opinions to me. The distinction is
yours to draw…

Omniscient; BAG

[[But anecdotally, for the record. I have observed women always getting
sick, and always being medicated.]]

Thank you for the word “anecdotally” there. Now, I love men to death (so to speak), but I beg to differ with a few of you guys on this issue. I work with AIDS stats, so “anecdotally, for the record,” I see 90% male morbidity in my data. I also anecdotally see in the newspaper that over 90% of the homicide perpetrators and victims are male, as are probably about the same percent of prison inmates, in for every kind of criminal offense. Same with most of the drunk driving accidents, and actually accidents of all kinds, from the numbers I’ve seen. Every male I work with (and most of my neighbors, too, come to think of it) suffers from allergies and takes every kind of med for it. I have no problems there at all, and neither do any of my female co-workers. Oh, and over half the men I know have back problems. They tend to have higher cholesterol, anecdotally again, than females I know, and higher blood pressure, too. When I get around to it, I’ll pull up some real epidemiological health stats, too, and we can talk about something more than anecdotes.
Jill

Re “regularizing” one’s periods. I think the reason for doing this is convenience. It’s convenient to know when to expect it. It’s inconvenient, to say the least, to be taken by surprise.