Voting Rights Act of 2021. What would you put in this hypothetical Act?

It’s three years old, but this blog posting from the Pew Trusts describes some of the difficulties in getting a state ID card.

To get an ID card, most states require multiple proofs of identity or permanent residence, such as utility bills, Social Security cards or birth certificates. Some states require proof of homelessness, such as a letter from a social services agency.

And most states charge a fee to get an identification card — not to mention fees of as much as $50 for a copy of a birth certificate. But even with waived fees, getting an ID can be an arduous process entailing multiple visits to a state office.

Or read this eight-year-old report from the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law. Or this four-year-old article from The Washington Post (paywall warning).

National, it’s a unitary country

How? What are the methods they have proposed to make it difficult?
Still, why can’t the federal governemt do one and it’s anID valid in the whole USofA.

I think that’s what he wants. You saw he also wants more voter intimidation too.

Dewey just told you:To get an ID card, most states require multiple proofs of identity or permanent residence, such as utility bills, Social Security cards or birth certificates. Some states require proof of homelessness, such as a letter from a social services agency.

And most states charge a fee to get an identification card — not to mention fees of as much as $50 for a copy of a birth certificate

America doesnt want to have one due to the whole “papers please” of Dictatorships. Didnt Franco do that?

So, since the way you do things and the way that we do things are entirely different, that would explain why it is that you don’t understand why things are different.

This has been hashed, rehashed, smothered, covered, scattered and topped on this board. Let’s just start with the shutting down of BMV’s (where most people are able to get an acceptable ID) in minority areas, or limiting their hours to a few hours a month.

If you want more examples of republicans working to make it harder for minorities to get acceptable ID, then I suggest delving into I Pit the ID-demanding GOP vote-suppressors that thread.

Good question. Ask those who are against any form of Federal ID, those are primarily Republicans.

I don’t know that most of the 60% necessarily need convincing- 22% of them live in the seven or so states that still require a reason for absentee voting * , and plenty more live in the 30+ states that made changes to their voting laws this year, and wouldn’t have been eligible to vote any other way than in-person in 2018.

  • My state includes being unable to appear due to risk of contracting or spreading a communicable disease like COVID-19 as a temporary illness - but in 2018, I had to vote in person.

What’s difficult for many people is getting the necessary documentation. For example, proof of address. It’s easy enough if you own a house or are on a lease or have a utility account in your name. It’s not always so easy if none of those things are true- in fact, I made damn sure my son got his driver’s license before he turned 21. Because if he was under 21, I could go to DMV with him, fill out a form and provide proof of my address- but once his 21st birthday arrived, that would have been no good. And without that, he wouldn’t have had the necessary two proofs of residence.

Either way, it’s a big unknown and I’m concerned that people will realize today is voting day, not be prepared to vote by mail same-day, and then end up disenfranchised. I know firsthand that it is possible to keep polling places open and relatively safe during the pandemic (I voted last week). I just don’t see a good reason not to continue to allow voting in-person. We just have to roll it out carefully, be clear with instructions and get all the necessary resources in place.

~Max

Yeah, so you are living with a friend or relative. The bills arent in your name. How do you get proof of address? And why is that necessary anyway?

I know the excuses for not having them and the nefarious reasons why some counties/states make it difficult.
I still, however, can’t seem to grasp how my super-poor country gets everyone an ID card. People who lost their birth certificate during terrorism got one, people who never got a birth certificate, get an ID.
Maybe one of the “good” counties/cities/states can pilot a program, but both sides of the issue make it difficult to implement.
Of course, if you start with the idea that votind ID is per se wrong, you won’t work to implement it.
Crowdfound it.

Does your government want your citizens to vote, or does your government consider people voting to be a threat to their power?

In too many cases here in the US, we have the latter mentality. If you don’t get this, then consider yourself lucky that you don’t live in such a shithole country.

Because it’s first a national ID and second a voting document, I don’t see that problem.

Yeah, well for some reason here in the US, we have an aversion to national ID’s.

You’ll have to ask someone else why, as I haven’t actually heard a convincing argument that I would agree with.

How expensive and easy to get is it? Do you have to provide a Birth cert, and how expensive and easy to get are they? Do they have many places, near public transit to get one? Do they need to see a utility bill in your name?

Is the voting in many "states’ run by racists who will attempt to keep minorities from voting at all costs?

  1. “We haf to see zee papers, papers plis.” Authoritarian nations have them.

2.The voting in many states is run by racists who will attempt to keep minorities from voting at all costs, they wont allow a national ID unless it is expensive and hard to get, unless you are white.

  1. Why do we need one? There is the state driver lic, the passport, the passport card, military ID, and so forth.

You could punt that question to the ACLU, for example. “5 Problems with National ID Cards

~Max

If you already have one, no need. But elections without clear identification is silly. Also, in non-racist parts you also don’t have ID.
This is like American exceptionalism gone bad, no ID for voting is ridiculous. And, the whole “some racists will use it” is just an excuse for never having it. Show up the racists, show them how easily it could be done.

Many non-authoritarian nations have them as well.

Exactly a reason for a national ID. If they would oppose national ID for racist reasons, then they would have even more power over preventing state or local ID’s.

Not everyone drives, leaves the country, or is in the military.

Yeah, after 9/11, there was a bit of a push for some authoritarian level bio-metric ID system. This is what the ACLU was opposing.

Some form of ID is almost always necessary, and you also have to compare your signature against the one you have on file. It is limiting forms of acceptable ID to those that are harder to procure for more marginalized populations that is at issue.

It has nothing to do with whether a country is poor or not - it has to do with culture. We have an aversion to a national ID card, we have an aversion to giving the government information that’s not for a specific purpose *, we have an aversion to being asked to show “papers” **. So we are never going to issue everyone an ID card at birth or to everyone over a certain age.

Plus, we do hardly anything on a national level. Most other countries seem to be a single country divided into administrative regions - we’re more like the EU in that the Federal government has specific areas of authority and the states retain authority in all other areas. Which is why voting is different from state to state- some states mail ballots to every registered voter, other states allow anyone to get one on request and other states require a reason for an absentee ballot. Some states might require ID to vote- but mine only requires it for first time voters if they didn’t provide ID when they registered. After that, they just compare your signature to the one from your registration.

  • we don’t have an address registry as some countries apparently do. I don’t have to notify the government just because I move. If I have dealings with a particular government agency, I might have to notify that agency at some point but even that might not be immediately.

** which is extra funny when I ask some anti-immigrant types exactly how they would prove their citizenship to a police officer. Because they wouldn’t be able to unless they regularly carried their passport around and nobody does that- most people don’t even have a passport.