What's the maximum possible height you could get something like this to?

Having just watched this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3yR-GxD1is it made me wonder just how high you could get a camera like that up to. Is it possible make it go through the earth’s atmosphere? If it did, would it be fried or would it survive the journey?

you can put a camera anywhere you want in the universe

These guys sent a weather balloon with a camera to about 100,000 feet (about 19 miles). They put an iPhone in it as a GPS location device.

It looks like they used a helicopter drone in that video. Helicopter designs in general aren’t very good for extreme high altitude flight. It is hard to say what someone will come up with but the current limit is in the very low tens of thousands of feet for any helicopter-like design whether it is a drone or a full-sized helicopter.

High altitude balloons are a different story. The helium balloon altitude record is about 174,000 feet but even deigns that can break the 80,000 - 100,000 foot mark are common and not necessarily expensive either. They can easily carry a modern camera with sophisticated technology high enough into the stratosphere to see the curvature of the Earth clearly. That is also the range where suborbital space begins according to some definitions. Even hobbyists can and have achieved those altitudes with a balloon and camera with a successful recovery at the end.

However, the hot research now is with extremely ultralight solar-powered drone planes that can stay up literally for years at a time soaring in the stratosphere. They can cruise at the 60,000 - 80,000+ altitude range where weather isn’t an issue and get power through solar cells on their large wings. They require minimal power to soar because they are so light and their wingspans are disproportionately huge. Solar power also works well at those altitudes because the atmosphere is so thin.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2012/02/24/high-altitude-surveillance-drones-coming-to-a-sky-near-you/

Here’s another balloon, launched by some college students.