When was the last time a bill got 40 - 60% support from both Democrats and Republicans?

Is there a data source that lists every bill that has ever come up for vote in the US and the party affiliations for who voted for & against? I’m curious when the last time there was a bill which was genuinely controversial within both parties.

It seems like most of the bills we hear about on the news reflect strict partisan divides but I wonder if that extends to the more mundane, day to day aspects of governance as well.

Any idea where I can find such info?

This has a graphic representation of the votes for and against from each party, which should simplify the search for the type of vote I think you’re looking for:

From naita’s list, the last substantive bill to pass with broad bipartisan support was the 2019 defense appropriation bill.

Here’s one such vote “On approving the journal” where 44% voted against. Half of them dems and half reps. I have no idea why, or what journal that was:

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/votes/115-2018/h271

This bill passed with >60% support from both parties. I’m looking for bills that were controversial among both parties.

Okay, that is truly bizarre. US representatives deliberately try to game voting statistics?

The 2018 omnibus budget bill was passed 256-167.

For the yes votes, Rs provided 145, Ds 111. For the no votes, Rs provided 90, Ds 77.

I think that’s fairly close to your criteria.

That’s not what your thread title is asking.

I can see how people could read it a different way, but I understood what the OP was asking.

Absolutely.
And it is used in election campaigns. There is a Representative near me who is suffering from his opponents ads saying ‘he claims to be an independent, but he votes with Trump 96% of the time!’. That can hurt, in a District that voted for Hillary Clinton, and where support for Trump has gone down since then.

But Trump doesn’t have a position on approving the journal. In fact, contentious votes on approving the Journal are more of a signal about other matters, in very confounding ways:

http://www.legbranch.com/theblog/2017/3/29/how-unusual-the-house-twice-had-highly-divided-votes-over-approving-its-journal