Whether

Incorrect: “I will see you on Monday, whether or not it rains”

Correct: “I will see you on Monday, irregardless of whether or not it rains”


LINK TO COLUMN: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1190/is-whether-or-not-good-grammar

I have warm sock on
I think I might take them off
Or not, I’m still cold

Welcome to the Straight Dope Message Boards, toefungus, we’re glad you found us. For future ref, when starting a thread, it’s helpful to other readers to provide a link to the column in question. Helps keep us all on the same page, and saves searching time. No biggie, you’ll know for next time, and as I say: you’re welcome irregardless of the rainy whether :wink:

I don’t think any sentence with irregardless in it is “correct.” :dubious:

Okay then, help me correctly word the sentence, “I don’t think any sentence with irregardless in it is ‘correct’.”

It’s like Gaudere’s Law in 3D!

“Ir” is a Spanish verb meaning “to go.” It is pronounced like “ear” in English.

Regardless, I’ve got to go.

Whether the weather is hot, or whether the weather is cold, we’ll weather the weather whatever the weather, irregardless if you like it or not!

Just doesn’t have the same ring to it :frowning:

I prefer “… irregardless of whether or not it rains or it doesn’t,” but my friend points out that it should be “antidisirregardless”. He may be nonincorrect.

Correction to the correction: "I will see you on the exact same Monday we originally planned, irregardless of whether or not it rains. We’ll try and have tuna fish for lunch. Whom should we ask to come with us?

(Don’t forget that period!)

(Don’t over use exclamation points!!!)

[sub]I think you been whooshed, my friend.[/sub]

Well, what do you want? Good grammar or good taste?

My grammar’s long dead, so’s my gramper.

:smack:

You can always go for the double whammy of sounding both incorrect and arcane by using “sans regardless” or “bar regardless” to spiff up your speech. Eyebrows will raise. Little children will snicker. Pedants will puke.

Both modifying clauses are wrong when using the imperative form of the future tense. Correct would be “I would like to see you on Monday, whether or not is rains.” or “I could see you on Monday, whether or not is rains.”

Otherwise, “I will see you on Monday.” should be enough, or you’re going to be in big trouble on Monday.

How about cum irregard?

Ditto with the :smack:
Got me too.

Whether it rain or not, I will see you Sunday.

Whether it be fair weather or foul, I will see you Sunday.

If it be not to come it will be now, if it be not now yet it will come.

Conditional clauses take the subjunctive form of the verb.