Whoa! I'm a Geologist Again!

Just for this morning. I saw this picture in MSN pictures:

http://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/AAgmRX5.img?h=373&w=624&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

Stunning colors from a mountain range in Chinese central Asia. You see that the older beds slope from upper right to lower left. The red layer in the background seems to continue towards the foreground and is last exposed in the lower left of the picture. However, in the right foreground, you see that the lower (older) gray layer has been exposed and eroded and flat-lying sediments were deposited over the eroded surface (called an angular unconformity.) There are also flat-lying beds at the upper left, this time overlying the red layer and maybe another layer above it.

Sorry if I’m rattling out descriptions but that’s how I used to take notes when I was a geologist working in the field. Just wanted to share this. :smiley:

Rock on!

IME, you never stop being a geologist, it’s like being an alcoholic - if you do something else for a living, you’re just a recovering geologist :slight_smile:

Although I don’t miss the core logging…

I used to drive my wife nuts every time we drove to Edmonton by pointing out all the glaciation features of the landscape, Quaternary landform development, and erosion along the creek and rivers we went over. She was pretty happy when I finally graduated.

Welcome back.:eek:

Mrs. DrumBum is well used to my random comments about the geologic features I spot when we are traveling around. The closest one to us is the Congo River delta.

That makes the N.Saskatchewan seem pretty tame in comparison…

I like this!