Why keep doing The Truth ads?

I like the ads for The Truth about cigarettes, but since the exposure in the late nineties of cigarette companies and their deviousness, why keep doing them?
Are people really that ignorant about ‘The Truth’ behind the marketing of laced nicotine sticks?

And I never understood why anyone would sue a cigarette company for getting cancer in the first place, I mean…duh! But that’s a whole other issue.

Wow, you’re the first person I’ve ever heard say that they like the Truth ads.

I asked a similar question to my boss at one time. Though I don’t have cites to back this up, it was my understanding through him that the Cigarette and Tobacco companies had made obscure deals to keep such information off of the Networks and major publications.

Again, my understanding due to his explination is that recent court hearings and lawsuits forced the companies to reveal information that told of the more negative aspects of nicotine. Apparently Truth continues their ad compaign for a few points.

  1. The information is disclosed to the public and can be shared.
  2. Truth wishes to share the information to discourage smoking.
  3. Frivelous lawsuits against tobacco companies have raised a few eyebrows, and supposedly Truth can capitalize on the growing negativity to spread their message.

Again, this may not be fact. I’m just reciting what was told to me, though it seems to be pretty sound if a bit obtuse.

And I’m not necessary against Truth, as I’m not fond of smoking. However, I do believe in a person’s persuit of happiness as long as it doesn’t immediately endager me.

I just previewed this and realized I may be stating the obvious. Then again I’m on a sugar high. Oh well…

I think they’re effective.
But I’d rather see ‘Truth’ ads about other stuff more pertinent, like ANY current Big Business marketing lies, or political, like who’s lobbying dick is in who’s political butt, etc.

I think the issue of secretly laced cigarettes is moot at this point, though I understand the ads are funded by an anti-smoking group.

I’d venture though, that a ‘Truth’ ad about Big Business + Politics would either be sued quickly off the air or declined by the networks in the first place because they’re in on the take.
Oops, I’ve stepped into conspiracy land. Sorry.

“Truth” adverts made me start smoking again.

Maybe they “keep doing them” in order to keep reaching young people who are not as aware of the tobacco companies’ history. A lot of smokers get started in their teens, before many of them are old enough to appreciate what they are getting themselves into.

The problem I have with them is that they’re anti-cigarette company ads instead of anti-smoking ads. And my problem with that is that it perpetuates the idea that the tobacco companies are more responsible for a smoker’s condition than the smoker himself, which is IMO boneheaded.

I’m a smoker, and I know that tobacco companies and their lobbyists are sleaze and that they willfully hid information that was endangering their customers. But I still would never claim that any health problems that result from my smoking are the fault of anyone other than myself. When I started, the dangers of smoking were already clear and well-publicized, and I went ahead and started, thinking (like many people) that I’d be able to quit with no problem.

Still, I don’t think it’s time for them to go, and I’m glad they keep doing them. It’s important to keep awareness of it out there, and not to give the tobacco companies any breathing room (so to speak). (And yeah, believe me that the hypocrisy of my saying that while still giving the tobacco companies my money isn’t lost on me, so there’s no need to point it out.) I just wish that people didn’t think that they were “enough,” that the problem is publicized enough at this point and there’s no more danger, and that there’s no need for publicity against smoking itself instead of just the companies.

People aren’t really going to be inclined to quit, or to avoid starting in the first place, unless it’s emphasized how much it affects them personally. And it’s not just “wacko if you’re a teen,” as Phillip Morris ads suggest. Even the most insipid message – like the goofy dialogue in the movie XXX – is good as long as it emphasizes the idea that nobody thinks there’s anything cool about it and there’s no real good reason to start.

I never thought of it that way. That’s a very good point. They really do portray the companies as more responsible than the individual. Well, that sucks…

And as to the point that young people coming of age in cigarette land do not know about the last decade’s cigarette company exposures and need to be taught-- that’s a valid point, but for some reason it pisses me off. I don’t care much for the excuse that young people use nowadays (old curmudgeon voice here) that they aren’t aware. They are! And if they’re not because they’ve chosen to narrow their world view down to the size of an MTV two-second camera shot, well then they deserve to get hooked on cigarettes (end Abe Simpson voice).

Amen!

They also make me want to put a bullet thru the TV screen. Pretencious, self-important, ‘we know what’s good for you’ jerks! :mad:

I was born in 1965 and at no point was it never not obvious to me that smoking was bad for you. These commercials are an insult to your intelligence.

And I’m a non-smoker…

Why do they keep making Pepsi ads? Surely everyone who wants a Pepsi knows where to find one by now.

What pisses me off are the brown paper “tag” stencils they staple in trendy magazines. Sounds PETA-ish to me.

The point of the Truth ads is not to get adults to stop smoking, it’s to prevent kids from starting. It’s extremely difficult for me to understand why anyone would choose to start smoking in 2003, yet we know that kids do. So the question becomes, how do you stop them from getting addicted to this self-destructive behavior? All of the marketing studies have shown that providing information about the health dangers of smoking doesn’t work, because kids think that they’re immortal and that it won’t happen to them. What does appeal to kids is “sticking it to The Man” in the form of parents, the government, and big business. So if you say to kids, “look at these big corporations that are trying to get your money by hooking you on something that will make you sick,” you might have more of an impact than if you simply tell them that cigarettes cause cancer. These ads are specifically designed to put the blame on the company rather than the individual because that approach has a better chance of working.

I’m a little fuzzy on this, but don’t they have to do them? That’s the anti-smoking campaign money from the tobaco settlement, and they have to spend it somehow.

They could be spending this settlement money on ads that work and actually make people think.
Whenever I see a Truth ad, they seem to be the bread and butter of UPN, I always get the impression of a bunch of punk kids rawkin and being X-TREEM with a message but irritating people who could care less about their agenda dictated by some remote boardroom which is most likely a puppet of a tobacco company.
The chick in the ad where she’s standing in the street saying that a tobacco company building is behind her and one of the answers a tobacco executive was supposed to give was “We believe we can remain profitable which is why we stay in business” (and I do paraphrase). She’s hot, I’d bang her only if she was just being an actress doing a job and went for a smoke after the cameras stopped rolling.
Plus the Truth ads have made me start smoking in social situations with close friends after being a long time non-smoker who was a dick about it when I was idealistic and fifteen years old.

The 60s were over a long time ago. Kids couldn’t care less about these things.

that smokers, rather than being the cool sophisticates that the tobacco companies portray them as in their ads, are in fact, retarded Neanderfucks who stink like shit.

You know, I always thought the best anti-smoking ads would show some guy getting thrown out the window of a bar (like in a corny western) then the bartender coming out, giving the guy a few more kicks for good measure, then throwing a pack of cigarettes on him and saying “Don’t let me see you doing this in my bar again”. Would probably reflect the California anti-smoking sentiment. :slight_smile:

I think the best way to make kids not smoke is to portray it as such an unpopular habit that kids wouldn’t want to start for fear of becoming unpopular. Kind of exploiting the whole “I want to be exactly like everyone else” mentality a lot of teenagers seem to demonstrate.

I’m sorry, but that is just really stupid.

I’m glad they’re still doing them. I get paid a buck every time someone on an internet message board says that Truth ads make them want to smoke.

I saw a new one yesterday that claimed some tobacco companies specifically started a campaign to target homeless people and gays, and they called it “project scum.” I was rather shocked at this, does anyone know if this claim is true?

I also find these ads annoying, but I think the original idea behind them was a good one, that is, to try to just come out and tell the truth about smoking without pitiful little catch phrases like “tobacco is whacko.” It would work better, IMO, to just have real teens / adults tell what smoking has done to them, and for young people, emphasize the short-term effects from smoking, as teens don’t care about long-term health risks.

The idea of placing some blame on tobacco companies is ok to me, they use(d) deceptive advertising and questionable marketing at best and outright lied at worst. I quit about a year ago and it does anger me that I gave so much money to these companies, but I do take responsibility for my own health, and my own choices. I would never sue them if I got sick because of smoking, but I do think they should be limited in their advertising.

BTW, Truth ads do not make me want to smoke. I find them annoying, but advertising in general does not make me need to go out and do anything as a reaction against their message, especially endanger my health out of spite. YMMV.