Would you wait in line for 2 hours to smell a stinky flower?

That’s pretty fascinating. I didn’t know they had smaller relatives that people can grow at home.

Hmm, maybe I can grow some near the neighbours if I don’t like the neighbours? :stuck_out_tongue:

You can grow the big ones at home if you live in the right climate zone or have a hothouse. That wasn’t true when I first started growing my relatives, but now seeds and young plants of titanium are readily (if somewhat expensively) available.

For something that just stinks? Probably not. But the very name Corpse Flower and I have a feeling I would be so in line that it would surprise even me. I have smelled decomp and the idea of something alive naturally producing that smell intrigues me.

Wow, I didn’t know that. Though I’ve heard that even among plant experts, the corpse flowers are difficult to care for, especially maintaining them for years until the rare blooming occurs.

I did wait in line to see a stinky flower. Alas, it was not the least bit stinky by the time I got to it.

They’re not that bad, it’s just time and space that’s really the issue for most people, as they get so tall that even a normal size greenhouse isn’t big enough and can sit dormant for months. They used to be considered tricky, but the watering regime and stuff is pretty well worked out by now.
Fun to re-pot though, the corms are huge, I got to play with some smaller ones during work experience, the bigger ones take several people to lift.

I heard that the flower in Vancouver was really stinky the morning after it opened, but there wasn’t as much smell by noon or so. So the strong smell doesn’t last all that long.

Same here. The smell was very underwhelming. Fortunately the line was short when I went.

I might not mind seeing it, actually, if I knew it was at the point where the smell had gone. Though I don’t know if I’d wait for a long time to see it.

I certainly would not wait in line two hours to see it. I hate waiting in line and my feet start to ache.

Every May the local Ben and Jerry’s has free ice cream for a day. You get one scoop in a cup as far as I can see. The lines snake around the block and could conceivably take an hour. I would pay the cost of a scoop of ice cream not to have to stand in line.

Sure. I enjoy botanical exotica.

Bingo!

MY WIFE: Can we got to [expensive restaurant] tonight to celebrate our anniversary?

ME: Sure!

HOSTESS: There is about a 90-minute wait. Can I get your name?

ME (TO WIFE): I will pay you what the dinner would cost…in cash…if we can go home now.

It doesn’t interest me quite enough to wait in line for hours. I think the attractions are the bloom’s rarity, unpredictability, brevity, and the unique smell. Eliminate any one of those, and there’d be a lot less interest.

OP here. I have waited in line for a while if I figured it was for something worthwhile, but I doubt I’d do it for anything stinky.

I saw one in Washington DC last year. I only had to wait about 15 minutes, iirc.

The flower produces most of its smell at night, to attract night flying predators. So the smell isn’t particularly strong during the day. But it is beautiful and spectacular to look at.

While the smelly part is important, please note that this one of the largest flowers in the world and they only bloom once every few years. This is a rare and extraordinary event for gardening enthusiasts, something they may ever experience a few times in their lives.

Given that, I would probably stand in line for two hours.

I doubt that I’d wait all that long for a flower either, no matter how stinky.

Beckdawrek, an off topic linguistic question. My impression was that you were from Arkansas? Reason I ask is that you used “[stand] on line” to mean what most Americans would say as “[stand] in line,” and the only folks I’ve heard use that particular expression are from NYC and its environs. Is there a pocket of “on liners” somewhere in the mid-South, or are you a Noo Yawker by birth, or was it a slip of the fingers? Inquiring minds wish to know! Thanks.

I’d sort of like to see that flower in person – I think there’s one blooming at the Conservatory in Golden Gate Park right now. I can’t make it this time around unfortunately. As far as waiting 2 hours goes, I wonder if you have to show that early to be in front of the line when the place opens? I’d rather get in early and get out as opposed to shuffling along in line for hours.

I was coming in to say something like this. Corpse flowers may be the rock stars of the exotic flower world, but they’re not real rock stars ;). Nobody waits overnight for the chance to be in the front of the line when it opens. I’d go see one( because neato ), but I would just make sure I got their early and avoided the weekend if possible to avoid the lines.

I probably wouldn’t wait two hours for anything that didn’t involve an emergency room visit.

OP here. I discovered an article that might explain the appeal of corpse flowers - specifically, why people might actually want to smell them:
People Sometimes Like Stinky Things—Here’s Why

Some refer to a concept called “benign masochism,” where people have the experience of a “safe threat” - something that it seems they shouldn’t enjoy, but they do. Examples mentioned in the article are scary movies, eating hot peppers, smelling corpse flowers, and even zit-popping (which I never did understand the appeal of.)

I find it a pretty fascinating article.