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Old 06-04-2003, 12:20 PM
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Dr. Pepper


we all know the cola flavor comes mainly from a plant (kola beans, i think?); but where does the "dr. pepper" flavor come from?
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Old 06-04-2003, 12:38 PM
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The Master's Minion speaks.
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Old 06-04-2003, 01:12 PM
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Thanks pravnik for posting that link and getting the Straight Dope on Dr Pepper out. I swear if hear "prunes" one more time (sits in corner, knowing somebody will post "prunes!") I'll, I'll, I'll probabaly not do much but and keep on drinking Dr Pepper. The only soft drink Duke drinks.
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Old 06-04-2003, 01:22 PM
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I like my Dr. Pepper's in the form of a Beer with a shot of Amaretto dropped in...
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Old 06-04-2003, 01:29 PM
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It's clearly an amaretto flavor (I consume gallons of the stuff). Hence, probably comes from almonds or cherries (similar flavor--which is whay so many people say that DrP and Cherry Coke taste identical).
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Old 06-04-2003, 02:16 PM
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cecil's article just said it doesn't contain anything related to cherries.
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Old 06-04-2003, 02:40 PM
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And artificial cherry flavor does not, indeed, have anything to do with cherries. IIRC, what most people consider to be a "cherry" flavor is actually derived from pomegranets.

But while we're on the subject, what's the general term for a Dr Pepper-type soft drink? Coke, Pepsi, and RC are colas. Sprite and 7up are lemon-lime drinks. A&W and Barq's are root beers. But what are Dr Pepper, Mr Pibb, and the various generic imitations?
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Old 06-04-2003, 02:49 PM
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Actually, colas don't have much kola.

"[M]ost consumers will be disappointed to know that very little of this exotic nut is found in todayís cola drinks. In fact, what is generally perceived as cola flavor is really a mixture of vanilla, caramel, and spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, and allspice."

From this site.
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Old 06-04-2003, 04:55 PM
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Does anyone else get a sense of euphoria after drinking Dr Pepper? No other soda does this for me..
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Old 06-04-2003, 06:03 PM
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What I want to know is who came up with the idea to put phosphoric acid in soft drinks?
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Old 06-04-2003, 08:35 PM
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umm... what IS phosphoric acid?
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Old 06-04-2003, 09:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by gypsymoth3
umm... what IS phosphoric acid?
Well, for one thing, RUST REMOVER!!!
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Old 06-05-2003, 01:10 AM
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Phosphoric acid = H3PO4
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Old 06-05-2003, 02:20 AM
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http://www.inchem.org/documents/jecf...o/v38aje10.htm
Code:
    PHOSPHORIC ACID

    CHEMICAL NAMES        Phosphoric acid; orthophosphoric acid

    EMPIRICAL FORMULA     H3PO4

    MOLECULAR WEIGHT      98.0

    DEFINITION            Phosphoric acid contains not less than 85% of
                          H3PO4

    DESCRIPTION           Clear, colourless, odourless liquid of syrupy
                          consistency.  Miscible with water and ethanol.

    NATURAL OCCURRENCE    Phosphorus-containing substances occur very
                          widely in natural foods usually as free
                          phosphoric acid or as the potassium, sodium or
                          calcium salts.  Phosphate is found in highest
                          concentrations (0.1-0.5% or more, in terms of
                          phosphorus) in such foods as milk, cheese,
                          nuts, fish, meat, poultry, eggs (yolk), and
                          certain cereals.

    USE                   As a sequestrant, an antioxidant and a
                          "synergist" for other antioxidants; also as an
                          acidulant and flavour in beverages and fruit
                          products.

    Biological Data

    Biochemical aspects

    Phosphoric acid is an essential constituent of the human organism, not
    only in the bones and teeth, but also in many enzyme systems.
    Phosphorus plays an important role in carbohydrate, fat and protein
    metabolism.

    The daily intake of phosphate necessary for man lies between 1 and 
    2 g.  Insufficient supply of phosphate produces deficiency in the
    bones. Since the phosphate concentration of serum and tissues is
    maintained by physiological regulations, the intestinal absorption
    depends on requirements and is therefore limited.  Doses of 2 to 4 g
    act as weak saline cathartics.  Excretion takes place mainly in the
    faeces as calcium phosphate, so that the continuous use of excessive
    amounts of sodium phosphate and phosphoric acid may cause a loss of
    calcium.
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Old 06-05-2003, 06:32 AM
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Couldn't someone take it to a chem lab and have it analysed?
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Old 06-05-2003, 06:40 AM
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Ah Dr. Pepper, so misunderstood........
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Old 06-05-2003, 07:13 AM
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Just released, available on Amazon.com, the autobiography you've all been waiting for:

They Call Me MISTER Pepper!

Yes, the famous soft drink Dr Pepper (note the lack of a period; he's male!) has scribed a sure-to-be-legendary story of greed, lust, and the misuse of honorifics. Engrossing and challenging, MISTER Pepper is (pardon the expression) peppered with anecdotes that take the reader behind the sometimes seedy world of nonalcoholic beverages.

The New York Times Book Review called it "zesty.. and full of carbonation!" and Booklist has named it as one of its Top 10 Books about Drinks. A must-read.
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Old 06-05-2003, 08:15 AM
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Quote:
Does anyone else get a sense of euphoria after drinking Dr Pepper? No other soda does this for me..
I notice this as well. While at work I occasionally sip on a Dr Pepper during break and when I return to my slave job I feel a new sence of well being and happiness for my mundain life. Thank you Dr Pepper for making me feel as if I'm a character in a political tragedy novel. (1984, This Perfect Day, Brave New World, Dale from King of the Hill, etc...)
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Old 06-05-2003, 08:21 AM
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From Cecil's column:
Quote:
If you hold some Dr Pepper in your mouth a few minutes before swallowing, there is a slight yogurt like note.
Gah. Geesh. Ick. Bleh. How do people learn things like that? "Hmm, I'm bored today. I think I'll take a mouthful of Dr Pepper and see how the flavor changes over, say, ten minutes."
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Old 06-05-2003, 08:36 AM
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Anybody remember the Dr Pepper ads where the wanted you to drink it hot?? Anybody ever actually try it??
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:14 AM
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Dr Pepper is the sweet nectar of the Great Old Ones, no matter how you drink it.
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:14 AM
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its plums


I wonder...hot.hmmmm...
What if we tried this with other soft drinks?
Hot 7 Up?
Warm Root beer?
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:15 AM
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...drink it hot? Oh my god, that is just sooooo wrong!
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:36 AM
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In the movie "Blast From the Past" (Brendan Fraser and Alicia Silverstone) the family is hiding underground in a 40s bomb shelter and the dad has stocked 50 years worth of Dr Pepper because he heats it on the stove every morning before drinking it.

Ick.
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Duke of Rat
Anybody remember the Dr Pepper ads where the wanted you to drink it hot?? Anybody ever actually try it??
No, but my grandmother does...Diet DP, as a matter of fact...

However, in the interests of fighting ignorance, and because one of the few perks of my job is free sodas, I will now go and zap me some DP and report on the results.
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Old 06-05-2003, 10:07 AM
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Materials: 4 oz Dr Pepper from a can featuring Hugh Jackman as Wolverine, 1 paper towel, 1 standard coffee cup, 1 small, low-wattage microwave oven

Method: Dispense Dr Pepper from can into coffee mug, place in center of microwave oven, cover with paper towel. Heat for 30 seconds. Allow to cool briefly. Sip slowly.

Results: Not bad...better than room-temperature DP, anyhow. It is a bit thinner, and totally flat. The flavor is much sharper and acidic than when cold, almost harsh and medicine-like. The color seems unaffected, but it is much more aromatic. On the whole, drinkable, but not recommended.
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Old 06-05-2003, 10:07 AM
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Hmm, if Diet DP is sweetened with aspartame, I wouldn't recommend heating it. Heat can break down the aspartame molecule, making it lose its sweetness and also liberating methanol, which ain't great stuff to drink. (Cite, one of many.) This is also why NutraSweet is not recommended for cooking with.
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Old 06-05-2003, 10:48 AM
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Re: its plums


Quote:
Originally posted by Equal
I wonder...hot.hmmmm...
What if we tried this with other soft drinks?
Hot 7 Up?
Warm Root beer?
My parents used to boil 7 Up for me as a toddler when I was sick.
(I don't know, I think my pediatrician reccomended it. I'll ask my mom.)
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Old 06-05-2003, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Chronos
But while we're on the subject, what's the general term for a Dr Pepper-type soft drink? Coke, Pepsi, and RC are colas. Sprite and 7up are lemon-lime drinks. A&W and Barq's are root beers. But what are Dr Pepper, Mr Pibb, and the various generic imitations?
Oddly enough- "pepper-style soft drinks".
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Old 06-05-2003, 11:48 AM
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That doesn't sound like a very good name. For ages I was put off even trying Dr Pepper because I thought it would taste, well, peppery, whereas in fact it's just low-grade fake-fruit unpleasantness.
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Old 06-05-2003, 11:50 AM
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I dunno, I think it tastes cinnamony . . .
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Old 06-05-2003, 12:21 PM
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I've had it hot at evening football games in the Fall. It's true, I drank one after 4:00.
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Old 06-05-2003, 12:45 PM
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Barney Miller


Hot Dr. Pepper once made an appearance in an episode of Barney Miller. Barney pours himself a cup from the coffee pot, takes a drink, and suddenly spits it out, exclaiming "What the hell is this?". Wojo said that because of the on-going water shortage in New York City, he made hot Dr. Pepper instead of coffee.
Barney told him to make some real coffee.
"But Deitrick drank his!"
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Old 06-05-2003, 01:30 PM
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Don't people put peanuts in Dr. Pepper, and then drink the soda and eat the nuts? I think I read somewhere that this is a southern thing.
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Old 06-05-2003, 03:01 PM
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Peanuts in a soft drink (usually Coke, from what I understand) was trendy in the South during the '50s. I asked my mother about it. She didn't know why kids did it either, and she was one of the kids doing it.
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Old 06-05-2003, 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by Kilt-wearin' man
Peanuts in a soft drink (usually Coke, from what I understand) was trendy in the South during the '50s. I asked my mother about it. She didn't know why kids did it either, and she was one of the kids doing it.
I used to work with a couple of transplanted southerners who told me it was RC cola that you were supposed to put peanuts in. Also not just a '50s thing - they're both too young for that. One is in her 40s and the other is in his 20s. Of course, it could have evolved from Coke in the '50s to RC later. I also have a recipe for "Co-Cola Salad" - another '50s-era Southern thing that involved your basic Jell-o mold with fruit only with Coke mixed in, layered with Cool-Whip. There's a similar recipe at the coca cola website but the one I have is a little different. I think it had bananas. I've always been afraid to try it.
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Old 06-05-2003, 03:48 PM
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Couldn't someone take it to a chem lab and have it analysed?
Probably not. In my Patents class, our professor told us that the Coca-Cola company (and no doubt other companies as well) add chemicals to their soft drinks that serve no purpose other than giving "false positives" and other erroneous results if you try to analyze the chemicals in the product. Reverse-engineering a soda is thus pretty darn difficult.
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Old 06-05-2003, 04:36 PM
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No need to do so, Max. Read "Big Secrets" by Poundstone. Basicly, we already know almost exactly what is in each soft drink- the difference is in tiny flavourings and the amount there of. Note that stores can make a very passable imitation of colas & "pepper drinks" for their store brands.

If someone wanted to they could (and likely have) make a erzatz "Coke" that would taste (in a blind taste test) exactly like "the real thing". Makes no difference- most dudes buy their favorite simply out of "brand preferance" and they can't even tell the difference between Coke & Pepsi (and these do have slight but distinc diferences to a educated palate). Of course, now some Coca Cola fanatic will come in here and swear HE can. Blind taste test studies by independent testers show different results, however, for the large majority of drink fans. Thus, you may insist you can always tell the difference, but I'd say that 90%+ of Coke drinkers, if given Pepsi hidden inside that familiar wasp-waisted bottle, would not say anything. And, if given a blind taste test, maybe 60% could tell which was Coke consistantly.

Although I can usually tell the difference between Diet Coke & Diet Pepsi- I can't do it with any sort of accuracy from fountain drinks, as the syrup etc mix is always off a bit anyway.

Face it- most dudes prefer their brand because it IS "their brand". Just like cigs.
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Old 06-05-2003, 05:29 PM
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quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Booklist has named it as one of its Top 10 Books about Drinks. A must-read.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

there's over 9 more books about drinks out there most of of which are worse than a book about Dr Pepper???
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Old 06-05-2003, 07:27 PM
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Pepsi Blue: A Boy and His Dream Involving the Tidy Bowl Man
New Coke and the Hollywood Left: How Tinseltown Ruined the Life of the Most Promising New Drink
My Life in Milk
Miner's Heaven: The Story of Evian Mineral Water
Beverage of the Gods: The True Story of Coffee
Slammed!: The Story of Mister 7-UP and his Seven Years in Prison
Leggo My Tequiza
The Unadulterated History of Nonalcoholic Brews
Gold Water: The Tale of Perrier in Politics
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Old 06-05-2003, 07:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Reeder
What I want to know is who came up with the idea to put phosphoric acid in soft drinks?
If I recall correctly, the phosphoric acid is an aid in bottleing to keep the disolved CO from fizzing out.
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by DrDeth
[B]most dudes buy their favorite simply out of "brand preferance" and they can't even tell the difference between Coke & Pepsi (and these do have slight but distinc diferences to a educated palate). Of course, now some Coca Cola fanatic will come in here and swear HE can. Blind taste test studies by independent testers show different results, however, for the large majority of drink fans. Thus, you may insist you can always tell the difference, but I'd say that 90%+ of Coke drinkers, if given Pepsi hidden inside that familiar wasp-waisted bottle, would not say anything. And, if given a blind taste test, maybe 60% could tell which was Coke consistantly.
Would it be possible to provide some kind of cite instead of making up numbers?
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by DreadCthulhu
Dr Pepper is the sweet nectar of the Great Old Ones, no matter how you drink it.
Testify Brother!
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Old 06-05-2003, 09:42 PM
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Originally posted by herman_and_bill
If I recall correctly, the phosphoric acid is an aid in bottleing to keep the disolved CO from fizzing out.
I'll add another call for "provide a cite and stop making stuff up".
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Old 06-06-2003, 12:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by caveman
Materials: 4 oz Dr Pepper from a can featuring Hugh Jackman as Wolverine, 1 paper towel, 1 standard coffee cup, 1 small, low-wattage microwave oven

Method: Dispense Dr Pepper from can into coffee mug, place in center of microwave oven, cover with paper towel. Heat for 30 seconds. Allow to cool briefly. Sip slowly.

Results: Not bad...better than room-temperature DP, anyhow. It is a bit thinner, and totally flat. The flavor is much sharper and acidic than when cold, almost harsh and medicine-like. The color seems unaffected, but it is much more aromatic. On the whole, drinkable, but not recommended.
That's because you forgot the whiskey! Hot Dr Pepper is best enjoyed with at least a shot or two of whiskey mixed in.
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Old 06-06-2003, 05:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Desmostylus
I'll add another call for "provide a cite and stop making stuff up".
I do take offense at being accused of making stuff up.



http://www.motherearthworks.com/articles/Food/soft.htm
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Old 06-06-2003, 06:52 AM
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Forgive me if I find your cite less than credible. It says:
Quote:
In a recent edition of Townsend Letter For Doctors And Patients an article called The Curse Of The Soft Drink inspired me to bring this to your attention. The following are excerpts of that article written by the author Stan Field.

The soft drink market is huge and has a long history. What we know of as soda had its origin in Atlanta Ga. Back in the 1880ís. The new non-alcoholic beverage would quench the thirst and provide pep. Itís ingredients were cocaine, kola bean, sugar, caramel coloring, lime juice, citric acid, phosphoric acid, nutmeg, coriander, neroli, and cinnamon. Have you guessed it yet?

So how can such an innocent drink be of harm to the body? Lets look at some of the ingredients that you will find in almost every can of pop. Most contain phosphoric acid, caffeine, sugar, saccharin or nutri-sweet, caramel coloring, carbon dioxide and aluminum. The detrimental health benefits of these beverages takes its toll over a long period of time. I really donít think having a soft drink occasionally does much harm but what about pop-aholics who drink numerous daily.

Lets begin with phosphoric acid: this is used in soft drinks to allow the bubbles of carbon dioxide to release more slowly which helps with bottling. Phosphoric acid has a sour taste and needs sugar to make it more palatable.
Firstly, the whole point of putting the phosphoric acid in is to make the stuff taste sour. The idea that the sourness is somehow a side-effect that needs to be counteracted by adding more sugar is laughable.

Secondly, the author purports to be quoting another source, "The Curse Of The Soft Drink" by Stan Field. That source can be found here:

http://www.google.com.au/search?q=ca...hosphoric+acid

It's the usual "soft drinks are bad" stuff, but even so, it does not contain the sentence "Lets begin with phosphoric acid: this is used in soft drinks to allow the bubbles of carbon dioxide to release more slowly which helps with bottling", nor anything even vaguely resembling it.

So it looks like you're off the hook, it was the author of your cite that made it up.
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Old 06-06-2003, 07:18 AM
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Yea that link was from a health food place, I actually read that in the paper the other day and I was surprised that Google got me the same article. What I did find out that lowers the ph, maybe that helps to keep it from fizzing and also it is used as a cleaning agent, especially in brewing( It being phosphoric acid).

Thanks for taking me off the hook.
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Old 06-10-2003, 03:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by neuroman
Would it be possible to provide some kind of cite instead of making up numbers?
Well, you know, there is that little thing called "search" on your computer, where a search for "blind taste test coke pepsi" got over 50 hits, including one of our brother sites- Snopes. You really haven't heard of "the Pepsi Challenge"? Reams have been written about it.

Well, here is the snopes cite:
http://www.snopes.com/cokelore/newcoke.asp
  #50  
Old 06-10-2003, 05:26 PM
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For me, Dr. Pepper has become some what of a religious experience. Once I strarted drinking this tasty beverage (About 10 years ago), I couldn't get enough. I will say that I can't stand it even warm, so hot D.P. sounds slightly disgusting to me.

Nothing is better than an ice cold D.P. from the fountain at your local Taco Bell.

Anyone that thinks D.P. tastes "exactly like cherry Coke" has a serious lack of fungi-form papilae. Don't mind my spelling.

Why did they name this drink Dr. Pepper? I agree that at one point in time I would not drink it, thinking that it would taste peppery. Maybe Dr. Amaretto, or Dr. Almond, or Dr. Strangelove would have been better sellers.
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