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  #1  
Old 06-04-2004, 05:41 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
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What is/was "Boston-style coffee"?

Mr. S and I had lunch today in a diner with a long history -- it had in each booth a copy of the original menus from 1937. Pretty entertaining reading. The priciest item on the menu was steak for $1.00. There was also Heinz turtle soup, several flavors of phosphates, and daily plate lunches for 35.

One item had us flummoxed: Boston-style coffee, 10. Regular coffee was 5, so there must have been something mighty special about the Boston-style version to double the cost. Anybody know what it was? Googling yielded no information.

Thanks much!
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  #2  
Old 06-04-2004, 07:00 PM
RealityChuck RealityChuck is offline
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Made it Boston baked beans, of course.
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  #3  
Old 06-04-2004, 07:12 PM
samclem samclem is offline
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There was a brand of coffee called "Woods Boston Coffee" in the teens and later. I can't say that this has anything to do with your question.
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  #4  
Old 06-04-2004, 07:58 PM
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Coffee made with cream.

Make it with tomatoes and it's Manhattan coffee.
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  #5  
Old 06-04-2004, 08:01 PM
Papermache Prince Papermache Prince is offline
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Postcards has it right. Walk into a Boston area Dunkin' Doughnuts, ask for a regular coffee, and you'll be given one with milk in it. If you want it black, you'd better ask for it "black." Whether that's what the menu meant, I couldn't say.
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Old 06-04-2004, 08:22 PM
TellMeI'mNotCrazy TellMeI'mNotCrazy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by postcards
Coffee made with cream.

Make it with tomatoes and it's Manhattan coffee.

And SDMB style coffee... Coffee all over your monitor.

Thanks for that one, postcards!
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  #7  
Old 06-05-2004, 05:01 AM
peri peri is offline
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Coffee with extra cream
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Old 06-05-2004, 05:35 AM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
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That's it, huh? Surprising. Didn't *everyone* have cream in their coffee back then? (Not a big dieting culture, everything fried in lard, etc.) Perhaps it was a Depression-era thing that cream in your coffee was special?

And here I had been thinking that it might be "Irish" coffee, with a shot of booze; Boston = high Irish population. The place did offer a variety of bottled beers at the time.
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  #9  
Old 06-05-2004, 08:17 AM
postcards postcards is offline
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Geez, and I was just making a clam chowder joke!
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Old 06-05-2004, 09:23 AM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is online now
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Boston-style

Quote:
Originally Posted by postcards
Geez, and I was just making a clam chowder joke!
"Chowdah! Chow-dah!"
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  #11  
Old 06-05-2004, 09:42 AM
ratatoskK ratatoskK is offline
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I think in New York a "regular" coffee is also with cream? So what's with the "Boston" thing?
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  #12  
Old 06-05-2004, 09:53 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is online now
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I first read the expression "Boston Coffee" in a guidebook for Brits coming to the USA. In the years I lived in Boston and drank coffee, I never heard the expression.

I think it's one of those foods like "English Muffins" that are unknown in the place they are named after.
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  #13  
Old 06-05-2004, 10:39 AM
Billdo Billdo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ratatoskK
I think in New York a "regular" coffee is also with cream? So what's with the "Boston" thing?
In New York, "regular" coffee is with milk and sugar. (Assuming you don't mean regular to mean non-decaf or non-flavored.)
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  #14  
Old 01-09-2013, 11:57 AM
twinqtsdad twinqtsdad is offline
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A Boston-Style coffee

I agree with the Coffee with extra cream, not milk. I learned this "style" serving coffee about 40 years ago at White Castle. I was instructed that it was not only extra cream but half coffee and half cream. The customers that ordered it said it not only sweetened the coffee it cooled it down as well.
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  #15  
Old 01-09-2013, 12:06 PM
Mangetout Mangetout is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
I think it's one of those foods like "English Muffins" that are unknown in the place they are named after.
What's strange is that American Cheese is not one of these.
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  #16  
Old 01-09-2013, 12:10 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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Originally Posted by Papermache Prince View Post
Walk into a Boston area Dunkin' Doughnuts, ask for a regular coffee, and you'll be given one with milk in it.
I'm not so sure that's true anymore. It was true maybe 30 years ago.
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  #17  
Old 01-09-2013, 12:40 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
I think it's one of those foods like "English Muffins" that are unknown in the place they are named after.
I was surprised that London Broil is not a dish known in London England. Maybe it came from London Ontario or some other London though.

I don't drink coffee, so I have no idea what a Boston style or regular coffee in Boston means, but I've heard that 'regular coffee' varies by region.
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  #18  
Old 01-09-2013, 12:44 PM
Delta-9 Delta-9 is offline
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I worked in a small coffee shop in a local department store while growing up here in Chicago-istan, and when a customer ordered a Boston coffee, it meant they want lots of cream.

Last edited by Delta-9; 01-09-2013 at 12:44 PM..
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  #19  
Old 01-09-2013, 12:59 PM
Telemark Telemark is online now
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I'm not so sure that's true anymore. It was true maybe 30 years ago.
Or maybe 9 years ago when this thread was started.
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  #20  
Old 01-09-2013, 01:00 PM
mark24c mark24c is offline
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Originally Posted by TriPolar View Post
I was surprised that London Broil is not a dish known in London England. Maybe it came from London Ontario or some other London though.

I don't drink coffee, so I have no idea what a Boston style or regular coffee in Boston means, but I've heard that 'regular coffee' varies by region.
What on earth is London Broil?
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  #21  
Old 01-09-2013, 01:21 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Originally Posted by mark24c View Post
What on earth is London Broil?
A non-specific piece of roasted beef. Sometimes from the round or the sirloin, but there are a lot of different cuts used. It's like a very thick steak, roasted or broiled, and sliced thin.

Here's a thread from Cafe Society on the subject. Scylla put a great looking recipe in there.

Last edited by TriPolar; 01-09-2013 at 01:25 PM..
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  #22  
Old 01-09-2013, 01:32 PM
Lukeinva Lukeinva is offline
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That is a lot of cream for double the price.
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  #23  
Old 01-09-2013, 01:42 PM
FrankJBN FrankJBN is offline
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Two weeks ago at Dunkin Donuts in NJ, a "regular" coffee was still coffee, cream and sugar as it was 30 years ago at White Tower.
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  #24  
Old 01-09-2013, 01:46 PM
FrankJBN FrankJBN is offline
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Perhaps the OP started folks wondering - I note that are are plenty of references to Boston Style coffee on Google today. On the first two results pages all references are created after date of OP.
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  #25  
Old 01-09-2013, 01:58 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ratatoskK View Post
I think in New York a "regular" coffee is also with cream? So what's with the "Boston" thing?
You never get cream for your coffee unless you are in a fancier-than-coffee shop restaurant, and even then you usually have to ask for it.
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  #26  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:00 PM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Originally Posted by Papermache Prince View Post
Postcards has it right. Walk into a Boston area Dunkin' Doughnuts, ask for a regular coffee, and you'll be given one with milk in it. If you want it black, you'd better ask for it "black." Whether that's what the menu meant, I couldn't say.
I don't think that's so prevalent now, although maybe still in R.I.

But it must be very confusing for someone back then to see "Boston Style" and "Regular" listed as separate items, with different prices.

A few nights ago on Jeopardy, under the "American regionalisms" category, the answer was: A New England expression for what the rest of the country calls a milkshake. I knew the answer was "What is a frappe?", but I would have been tempted to say "What is a cabinet". The latter being a Rhode Island-ism and so maybe not qualifying as broadly New England.

Last edited by John Mace; 01-09-2013 at 02:03 PM..
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  #27  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:08 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Cabinet. Never, ever heard that. Etymology?
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  #28  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:20 PM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Cabinet. Never, ever heard that. Etymology?
Few have. I think it is thought to be that the ingredients, or some of the ingredients, were kept in a "cabinet".
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  #29  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:50 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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Cabinet is Rhode Island, not New England?

Sort of makes sense, as the only person I heard call it that was raised in the Attleboro area.
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  #30  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:50 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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Few have. I think it is thought to be that the ingredients, or some of the ingredients, were kept in a "cabinet".
Yeah, one of those mysteries that will never be solved. Like why the state is called Rhode Island.
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  #31  
Old 01-09-2013, 03:04 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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I knew the answer was "What is a frappe?",
How did they pronounce it?
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  #32  
Old 01-09-2013, 05:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Papermache Prince View Post
Postcards has it right. Walk into a Boston area Dunkin' Doughnuts, ask for a regular coffee, and you'll be given one with milk in it. If you want it black, you'd better ask for it "black." Whether that's what the menu meant, I couldn't say.
Slight nitpick - cream is default, not milk.
Small hot regular = 2 (squirts of ) cream, 2 sugars
Med regular (hot)- 3 creams, 3 sugars
Etc

Source - worked in a Boston area dunkin donuts in high school
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  #33  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:02 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Originally Posted by Leo Bloom View Post
Cabinet. Never, ever heard that. Etymology?
All you have to do is go down your local spa, probably right next to the packie and they will tell you.
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  #34  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:07 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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I'm not so sure that's true anymore. It was true maybe 30 years ago.
It was definitely true 8 years ago!
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  #35  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:10 PM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Yeah, one of those mysteries that will never be solved. Like why the state is called Rhode Island.
I know you are from Rhode Island but the full name of the state is the most descriptive of all states: Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. That about sums it up. You have Providence plus a whole bunch of large islands, the most important being Newport, that are close enough together to be connected by big bridges plus some that are offshore like Block Island. You could do some ocean filling to make it one contiguous land-mass but it wouldn't do any good. It is still going to the smallest state by far. Some people have ranches bigger than that. Unlike #2 Delaware, though Rhode Island has personality and personality goes a long way. I can be at the Rhode Island border 15 minutes from now if I wanted to and it would be about the same thing crossing from Canada into the regular U.S. culturally speaking. That is one strange little state you have going there and I don't mean that as a bad thing.

Last edited by Shagnasty; 01-09-2013 at 07:13 PM..
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  #36  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:11 PM
Scarlett67 Scarlett67 is offline
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OP here. Wow, blast from the past! No idea why I didn't get the clam chowder joke; I got it this time around!

Still wondering. The "extra cream"/"cream instead of milk" theory seems most plausible.
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  #37  
Old 01-09-2013, 07:21 PM
Lemur866 Lemur866 is offline
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Unlike #2 Delaware, though Rhode Island has personality and personality goes a long way.
We'd have to be talking about one charming motherfucking state.
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Old 01-09-2013, 07:29 PM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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That is one strange little state you have going there and I don't mean that as a bad thing.
I don't take it as a bad thing. As a matter of fact, it's the reason I decided to stay here.

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We'd have to be talking about one charming motherfucking state.
Niecefucking state actually.
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  #39  
Old 01-10-2013, 12:41 AM
Hershele Ostropoler Hershele Ostropoler is offline
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My neighborhood grocery store, here in Brooklyn, used to carry Autocrat syrup, but no more, alas.

(There, that's on topic whether we're talking about coffee or Rhode Island.)
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  #40  
Old 01-10-2013, 08:45 AM
Colibri Colibri is offline
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Moved to Cafe Society.

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  #41  
Old 01-10-2013, 09:02 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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It was definitely true 8 years ago!
Really? Maybe I'm just out of the loop, but I haven't heard it in a real life situation since the 80s.
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  #42  
Old 01-10-2013, 09:03 AM
ThelmaLou ThelmaLou is offline
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As long as we're on the subject, somewhere on the Food Network, I heard about a drink called Coffeemilk. I think it was bottled and only available in one of the New England states. Anyone familiar with it?
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  #43  
Old 01-10-2013, 09:10 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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As long as we're on the subject, somewhere on the Food Network, I heard about a drink called Coffeemilk. I think it was bottled and only available in one of the New England states. Anyone familiar with it?
That's the Autocrat syrup Hershele is talking about. They are the major provider of coffeemilk products here in RI.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Hershele Ostropoler View Post
My neighborhood grocery store, here in Brooklyn, used to carry Autocrat syrup, but no more, alas.

(There, that's on topic whether we're talking about coffee or Rhode Island.)
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  #44  
Old 01-10-2013, 09:11 AM
TriPolar TriPolar is offline
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NM, double post

Last edited by TriPolar; 01-10-2013 at 09:12 AM..
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  #45  
Old 01-10-2013, 09:19 AM
UncleMoose UncleMoose is offline
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Some Rhode Island info -
To answer tdn, "frappe" is pronounced frap (rhymes with wrap) - if you pronounce it frap-pay, it means you're not from around here.
From shagnasty, a "spa" was a mostly a soda fountain, where you would go to get tonic (soda), milkshakes (which did not have ice cream), or frappes/cabinets (which did have ice cream). I don't know where "cabinet" came from either.
A "packie" is a liquor store. At one point the law was that liquor stores had to wrap the contents of a sale in wrapping paper and tie it up with string. You couldn't walk out of the store with a bottle (even a bag with a bottle in it), you walked out with a package.
The reference to Autocrat syrup leads back to coffee flavoring. No, not flavoring you put in coffee, but Autocrat was (mostly) known for making (sort of) coffee flavored syrup you could add to milk. Many people know of chocolate milk, some know of strawberry milk, but round these parts you could get coffee milk, coffee milkshakes, coffee cabinets (here we go again), and even coffee shakes from McDonald's. These tasted nothing like real coffee - I grew up drinking coffee milk, but I've never learned to drink real coffee.
I once ordered coffee milk, and got a cup of coffee and a glass of milk. Turned out the waitress had just arrived from Long Island.
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  #46  
Old 01-10-2013, 01:45 PM
fumster fumster is offline
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Originally Posted by John Mace View Post
I don't think that's so prevalent now, although maybe still in R.I.
Still going strong in Boston. Just got back from Quincy, MA the home of the first Dunkin Donuts
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  #47  
Old 01-10-2013, 01:52 PM
Ike Witt Ike Witt is offline
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If I ordered a cup of coffee and got coffee with cream in it, I would expect my money back, or my order made right.
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  #48  
Old 01-10-2013, 02:25 PM
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If I ordered a cup of coffee and got coffee with cream in it, I would expect my money back, or my order made right.
You'd spend a lot of time being annoyed in the greater Boston area.
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  #49  
Old 01-10-2013, 03:34 PM
etv78 etv78 is offline
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Really? Maybe I'm just out of the loop, but I haven't heard it in a real life situation since the 80s.
I was refering to the fact the OP is 8 years old.
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  #50  
Old 01-10-2013, 05:41 PM
fumster fumster is offline
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If I ordered a cup of coffee and got coffee with cream in it, I would expect my money back, or my order made right.
That's only if you ordered a "coffee regular" or "regular coffee" if you just order "coffee" they'll ask how you want it.

Last edited by fumster; 01-10-2013 at 05:42 PM..
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