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  #1  
Old 11-12-2005, 02:22 PM
Skott Skott is offline
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Unusual Thanksgiving Dinner Ideas

I'm always looking to bring something new, perhaps even unusual, to our family Thanksgiving dinner, which generally has the standards of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, candied yams, cranberry sauce, etc. I especially like the idea of something that you wouldn't expect to find there, but somehow still fits the Thanksgiving "fall harvest" theme. And it'd be great if it's something that one usually doesn't get a chance to partake of. A few years ago I made a cream of pumpkin soup from a recipe that I got from a gourmet restaurant in Tahoe and last year made fresh cinnamon rolls from scratch. But this year, I'd like to find something that would have people saying, "Hey, you remember that year Skott made [x]? That was amazing!" Thoughts that have gone through my mind include dishes with a Chinese or Thai flair, novel uses for corn, or maybe even unusual drinks. Any suggestions or examples of things you've tried that have gotten good responses?
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  #2  
Old 11-12-2005, 02:48 PM
Motorgirl Motorgirl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skott
I'm always looking to bring something new, perhaps even unusual, to our family Thanksgiving dinner, which generally has the standards of turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, candied yams, cranberry sauce, etc. I especially like the idea of something that you wouldn't expect to find there, but somehow still fits the Thanksgiving "fall harvest" theme. And it'd be great if it's something that one usually doesn't get a chance to partake of. A few years ago I made a cream of pumpkin soup from a recipe that I got from a gourmet restaurant in Tahoe and last year made fresh cinnamon rolls from scratch. But this year, I'd like to find something that would have people saying, "Hey, you remember that year Skott made [x]? That was amazing!" Thoughts that have gone through my mind include dishes with a Chinese or Thai flair, novel uses for corn, or maybe even unusual drinks. Any suggestions or examples of things you've tried that have gotten good responses?
Cranberry sorbet as a between-course palate cleanser?
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  #3  
Old 11-12-2005, 04:19 PM
HelloKitty HelloKitty is offline
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Not sure if this is what you were thinking of, but we are considering doing away with the whole traditional fare and having a big fondue dinner. We'll do several kinds of meat, cheese, bread and veggies for dipping and then probably a chocolate fondue for dessert.

We've got I think 4 different fondue sets that we only seem to use 2-3 times a year. Thanksgiving seems like the perfect time for another!

Maybe you could add a chocolate fondue to your dessert table.
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  #4  
Old 11-12-2005, 08:13 PM
Hello Again Hello Again is online now
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If you have the Barefoot Contessa cookbook check out the recipe for roasted carmelized butternut squash. It has 3 ingredients but its really, shockingly good.

My mom likes to make butternut squash soup with cream, curry and a pureed apple. It's really good but a soup course is a fricking pain for a large gathering, so we usually talk her out of it.
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  #5  
Old 11-12-2005, 08:50 PM
Kiminy Kiminy is offline
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We do the fondue thing for Christmas, but are pretty traditional for Thanksgiving.

With a couple of exceptions....

For dessert, I usually make chocolate mousse, complete with Belgian chocolate and raw eggs.

Mr. Kiminy also likes my green beans with walnuts and blue cheese. Steam green beans until not quite cooked. Melt butter in a pan, and saute a handful or so of chopped walnuts in the melted butter. Add the steamed green beans and stir to get the walnut butter mixed in. Just before serving (and while it's hot) sprinkle with crumbled blue cheese.
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  #6  
Old 11-12-2005, 10:22 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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I've always wanted to have a really traditional Thanksgiving and serve the meal that the Pilgrims and Indians actually ate (with homage paid to 21st century hygiene). While they probably did have turkey, the records indicate they also had venison, duck, lobster, crabs and fish, a dish made of fresh cranberries mixed with walnuts and herbs, an Indian squash dish, etc.. Of course to be really purist you would cool to eat it from communal wooden plates and wash it down with homemade beer.
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  #7  
Old 11-13-2005, 01:26 AM
Hometownboy Hometownboy is offline
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A couple of years ago, I went with a winter fruit compote - I don't recall the exact ingredients - probably apples, satsumas, plums, peaches, etc., but the thing that got the most comment was the starfruit, sliced across to show the star shape, and how nicely they went with the rum-and-spices mixture drizzled over it. Wish I'd written that one down.
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  #8  
Old 11-13-2005, 01:46 AM
tiltypig tiltypig is offline
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How about a Thai pumpkin curry? Yum!
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  #9  
Old 11-13-2005, 02:05 AM
jayjay jayjay is offline
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I had a Filipino roommate once whose mother traditionally served calamari with Thanksgiving dinner.
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  #10  
Old 11-13-2005, 02:11 AM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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How about serving buttered toast, pretzels, ice cream sundaes, popcorn and jelly beans.




Well.....it would be different!
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  #11  
Old 11-13-2005, 02:17 AM
pkbites pkbites is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pkbites

But seriously, one thing we like to have is venison that I or one of my family members hunted, and vegetables that we grew in our garden. There is something extra special about having a feast of food that you grew yourself or hunted.
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  #12  
Old 11-13-2005, 03:54 AM
lissener lissener is offline
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This year I'm making:

Curried duck stuffed with apricot kuegel
Carrot-crab bisque with fennel crisps
Celeriac bread pudding
Roasted vegetables with ancho whipped cream

Maple squash pie
Rhubarb flan
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  #13  
Old 11-13-2005, 04:11 AM
A.R. Cane A.R. Cane is offline
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Turducken was all the rage a few years back. I'm sure it would make for a memorable dinner.

http://www.culinarycafe.com/Holiday_...Turducken.html
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  #14  
Old 11-13-2005, 08:44 AM
AncientHumanoid AncientHumanoid is offline
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Enchiladas, tamales, and guacamole.

Lots of chips and salsa, too.

Beer.


FOOTBALL !!!!!!!
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  #15  
Old 11-13-2005, 12:24 PM
Flipstrip Flipstrip is offline
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Here's a recipe for Indian-style green beans that my husband makes that everyone loves. He's brought it to Thanksgiving dinners before and everyone raves about them.

Gujerati-style Green Beans (Gujerati sem)


1 lb. (450g) fresh green beans
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon whole black mustard seeds
4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/2 to 1 hot, dried red chili, coarsely crushed in a mortar
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
Freshly ground black pepper

Trim the bean and cut them into one inch (2.5 cm) lengths. Blanch the beans by dropping them into a pot of boiling water and boiling rapidly for 3-4 minutes or until they are just tender. Drain immediately in a colander and rinse under cold, running water. Set aside. Heat the oil in a large frying pan over a medium flame. When hot, put in the mustard seeds. As soon as the mustard seeds begin to pop, put in the garlic. Stir the garlic pieces around until they turn light brown. Put in the crushed red chili and stir for a few seconds. Put in the green beans, salt and sugar. Stir to mix. Turn the heat to medium low. Stir and cook the beans for 7-8 minutes or until they have absorbed the flavor of the spices. Add the black pepper, mix, and serve.


He's made them without the chili too, and they still taste yummy. And these compliment lots of different meals very well.

Also, one of his friends hosts an annual Thanksgiving Daquiri Breakfast with all kinds of breakfast foods, movies, and lots of alcoholic (and non-alcoholic) drinks for everyone. Maybe you could talk your family into hosting something like that instead.
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  #16  
Old 11-13-2005, 12:55 PM
Sampiro Sampiro is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
This year I'm making:

Curried duck stuffed with apricot kuegel
Carrot-crab bisque with fennel crisps
Celeriac bread pudding
Roasted vegetables with ancho whipped cream

Maple squash pie
Rhubarb flan
What time should we be there? (I'll bring the Mogen David and a slab of ribs.)
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  #17  
Old 11-13-2005, 01:25 PM
yBeayf yBeayf is offline
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The problem with traditional dishes is that there's never any written recipes for them...

One holiday dish in my family that's always been a favorite of everybody is stuffed artichoke. I don't think anybody cooks it off of a recipe; just take some artichokes, trim the pointy bits, and stuff them with a mixture of bread crumbs, parmesan cheese, olive oil, garlic, and oregano, and bake it until it's baked.

Another thing to try is some fried cardoon, though I have no idea if it's available where you are. It's a plant with the texture of celery and kind of an artichoke-like flavor. To prepare it, peel the cardoon and boil them until they're tender, let them dry, and then batter and fry them.

Both of the above must be served with large amounts of pasta and Silician-style sugo, which is utterly unlike Americanized tomato-based pasta sauce, being instead thin, sweet, and a golden orange color. I am ashamed to say I have no idea how it's made -- it's a secret held by the women of the family.
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  #18  
Old 11-13-2005, 04:24 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sampiro
What time should we be there? (I'll bring the Mogen David and a slab of ribs.)
And I'll be hunkered down in the corner like Gollum, with rib bones sticking out of my snarfling mouth.
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  #19  
Old 11-13-2005, 04:53 PM
Glassy Glassy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
This year I'm making:

...

Rhubarb flan

Hmm. Do you have a recipe for that, lissener? It sounds really good.

--Jennifer
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  #20  
Old 11-13-2005, 07:03 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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I also would like the recipe for rhubarb flan, please!

What I'm making this year was the grand prize winner of Sunset Magazine's holiday recipe contest: Roasted-Sweet Potato Cheesecake with Maple Cream.

I'd be happy to post the recipe if anybody's interested.
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  #21  
Old 11-13-2005, 07:14 PM
gardentraveler gardentraveler is offline
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The cheescake recipe would be appreciated. Also the rhubarb flan.

Your whole menu sounds fabulous, lissener. Did you find all the recipes in one place, are they your inventions, or...??

GT
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  #22  
Old 11-13-2005, 07:39 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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I hope it's okay to post a magazine's recipe in it's entirety.

Roasted-Sweet Potato Cheesecake with Maple Cream


2 dark orange-fleshed sweet potatos (1.25 - 1.5 lbs total)

1 tbspn melted butter

Pecan crust (recipe follows)

2 tspns lemon juice

3 packages cream cheese at room temp

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup firmly packed brown sugar

4 lg eggs

1/4 cup whipping cream

1/4 cup sour cream

1/4 cup maple syrup

1.5 tspns ground cinnamon

1 tspn ground nutmeg

1/2 tspn ground ginger

maple cream (recipe follows)

1. Preheat oven to 375 (convection not recommended). Peel sweet potatoes and cut in half lengthwise. Place in a 9 x 13inch pan and brush with melted butter. Bake until potatoes are soft when pressed, 45 to 55 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, prepare crust. Bake in same oven with potatoes until lightly browned all over, 10 to 12 minutes.

3. Scrape any charred spots off potatoes, then cut potatoes into chunks. Whirl in a food processor or mash in a bowl with lemon juice until smooth. Reserve 1 cup, save any extra for another use.

4. Reduce oven temperature to 325. In a bowl, with a mixer on high speed, beat cream cheese until fluffy. Gradually beat in granulated and brown sugars, scraping down sides of bowl occasionally, until mixture is well blended and smooth. Beat in eggs, one at a time, until blended. Add reserved sweet potato mixture, the whipping cream, sour cream, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger. Mix on low speed until well blended.

5. Wrap bottom of cheesecake pan with heavy-duty foil, pressing it up the sides. Pour batter over crust. Put cheesecake pan in a 12 by 15-inch roasting pan at least 2 inches deep. Set pans in oven and pour enough boiling water into roasting pan to come halfway up sides of cheesecake pan.

6. Bake until cake barely jiggles in the center when gently shaken, about 55 minutes. Remove pans from oven. Lift cheesecake pan from roasting pan and let cool completely, then chill until cold, at least 1.5 hours, or up to 3 days (cover once cold).

7. Up to 6 hours before serving, cut around inside of pan rim to release cake, remove rim. With a pastry bag, pipe dollops of maple cream onto cake. Or serve maple cream separately, to spoon onto each wedge.

Pecan crust: Whirl 1/4 cup coarsely chopped pecans in a blender until finely ground; you should have 1/4 cup. In a bowl, mix pecans 1 1/4 cup fine graham cracker crumbs, 2 tbspns sugar, and 5 tblspns melted butter. Pour into a 9-inch cheesecake pan with removable rim (2 1/4 in. tall). Press mixture evenly over bottom of pan.

Maple cream: In a bowl, with a mixer on high speed, beat 3/4 cup whipping cream until stiff peaks form. On low speed, beat in 1/4 cup maple syrup just until blended.
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  #23  
Old 11-13-2005, 08:18 PM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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I like to bring "interesting" dishes to Thanksgiving dinner. One year I brought an innocent looking orange gelatin dessert, which contained a noxious secret ingredient...circus peanuts! I ran across the recipe and it was so disgusting I just had to inflict it on my relatives. You should have seen the looks on people's faces as they tried to figure out what that odd taste was.
Another year I brought a "cat litter" cake, complete with melted Tootsie Roll turds and a clean plastic scooper.
So far this year, the nastiest thing I've seen is a recipe for no-bake fruitcake. Of course, fruitcake is pretty nasty no matter what. It hardly matters anymore; few people want to eat what I cook for some reason.
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  #24  
Old 11-14-2005, 02:25 AM
ouryL ouryL is offline
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My sister did a "Nightmare Before Christmas" Thanksgiving using the old Halloween decor. The human-faced pimpkin pie was particularly gross.
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  #25  
Old 11-15-2005, 10:25 AM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ouryL
My sister did a "Nightmare Before Christmas" Thanksgiving using the old Halloween decor. The human-faced pimpkin pie was particularly gross.
I hope she served it beside a plateful of "ho" cakes









What??????
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  #26  
Old 11-15-2005, 02:42 PM
romansperson romansperson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dung Beetle
I like to bring "interesting" dishes to Thanksgiving dinner. One year I brought an innocent looking orange gelatin dessert, which contained a noxious secret ingredient...circus peanuts! I ran across the recipe and it was so disgusting I just had to inflict it on my relatives. You should have seen the looks on people's faces as they tried to figure out what that odd taste was.
Another year I brought a "cat litter" cake, complete with melted Tootsie Roll turds and a clean plastic scooper.
So far this year, the nastiest thing I've seen is a recipe for no-bake fruitcake. Of course, fruitcake is pretty nasty no matter what. It hardly matters anymore; few people want to eat what I cook for some reason.
Here's something you might want to consider:

Puppy Chow.

It does look a bit like dog food, and it's grossly sweet. My husband begged his mother to never make it again .
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  #27  
Old 11-15-2005, 03:56 PM
Kalhoun Kalhoun is offline
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A Native American friend of mine makes Squaw Corn. It rocks!

Corn
Bacon (cut into 1 in. pieces
Green and Red Pepper
Onion

Fry up the bacon, drain most but not all of the fat, then pour everything else in and cook til tender.


Mmmmmmmmm
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  #28  
Old 11-15-2005, 04:11 PM
Cervaise Cervaise is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardentraveler
Your whole menu sounds fabulous, lissener. Did you find all the recipes in one place, are they your inventions, or...??
Speaking as one who has enjoyed his kitchen wizardry, I'll confirm he's a culinary artist, and I'd be surprised if his recipes come from anywhere but his own noggin. I'm a competent cook; he's amazing.

My suggestion for the OP: coconut curry squash soup.

Ingredients (serves two people as a starter course; scale up as necessary)
  • medium (1 lb) squash (I use kabocha; it's tasty and easy to find, and you can make a bowl out of it; see below)
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 3 oz coconut milk (about half of a small can)
  • 8 oz chicken stock
  • 1 oz heavy cream
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1/2 tsp curry powder
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger liquid (grate and squeeze)
Step one: Bake the squash.

Preheat oven to 350F.

Cut the squash in half. (You'll probably want to gently tap a cleaver through it with a mallet, rather than risk messing up a good knife.) Remove seeds and pulp with an ice cream scoop. (Discard, or clean and set aside to toast. Yum.) Oil exposed flesh and place, flat (flesh) side down, on a lightly oiled sheet. Bake 45-55 minutes or until rind is slightly softened and dimples when touched. (Time will vary depending on size of squash.)

(For a slightly fancier presentation, use the rind as a bowl. Cut the squash in half crosswise, so you've got a top and a bottom. Clean seeds/pulp as above. Then use the ice cream scoop (note, a scoop, not a blade or a disher: my fave) to cut the flesh out of the rind, leaving a bit of flesh around the sides for structural stability, and a little extra at the bottoms of each half. Don't go too fast or try to cut too much at a time; allow 10 minutes per half. When done, you'll have two empty rind halves, and a pile of squash chunks and chips. Toss the scooped squash bits with the oil and bake 25-30 minutes or until the tips of the thinnest pieces are brown and the thickest pieces are soft. While the squash is cooking, carefully trim the stem and the rounded ends of the rind halves so they can sit flat. (This is why you leave a little extra in the bottom, so when you trim it you don't make a leakhole. Guess what I did the first time I tried this. ) Alternatively, if you can find smaller squash, say 1/2 to 2/3 pounds each, you can use individual gourds as bowls, cutting the top off a quarter of the way down to use as a lid (don't forget to scoop its flesh also). Whichever you do, it's kind of a pain in the ass to do it this way, so don't bother unless you have lots of prep time. If you do, though, it makes quite an impression, and may give you the "remember when he made that" effect you're looking for.)

Step two: Blend ingredients.

Put all remaining ingredients, along with baked squash, in blender. (Either scoop it out of its rind, if you baked with the first method above, or just dump in the baked chips, if you pre-scooped per the second method.) Depending on the size of your blender and the number of servings, this may take several batches; don't fill the blender more than, say, 3/4 full.

(Note: Food processor is not recommended for this, as most are not liquid-tight, and will leak.)

Blend until smooth. Taste. As desired, add salt, pepper, and curry powder in dashes, and blend again. Taste again. Try to resist the urge to get a spoon right now.

Step three: Heat on stovetop.

Transfer blend to soup pan and heat on medium-low for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until bubbles just begin to break the surface; reduce to low, cover, and heat another 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, let stand two minutes, and serve.

Optional: Dress top of soup.

For additional aroma and texture, sprinkle a dash of curry powder on top of the soup, along with a pinch of ground pistachio nuts (or as noted above, you could use the seeds, toasted and finely chopped).

This soup is relatively easy to make (unless you go with the labor-intensive gourd-as-a-bowl option), with few steps (unless there's a lot of people, necessitating multiple batches through the blender) and easy-to-find ingredients. The coconut milk and curry confer a taste that's just a bit exotic and yet comforting and familiar in our age of borderless cuisine. I've yet to hear anything but raves when I've served it.
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  #29  
Old 11-15-2005, 04:15 PM
Cervaise Cervaise is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervaise
Transfer blend to soup pan


"Soup pot."
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  #30  
Old 11-15-2005, 04:29 PM
Brynda Brynda is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hello Again
If you have the Barefoot Contessa cookbook check out the recipe for roasted carmelized butternut squash. It has 3 ingredients but its really, shockingly good.

My mom likes to make butternut squash soup with cream, curry and a pureed apple. It's really good but a soup course is a fricking pain for a large gathering, so we usually talk her out of it.
I would love to see the Roasted Squash recipe. Hint, hint.
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  #31  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:12 PM
Carnac the Magnificent! Carnac the Magnificent! is offline
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Whatever is served, there needs to be a 10-year hiatus on:

1) sweet potatoes with marshmallows (aka "candied yams")
2) green bean casseroles with any Durkee canned product on top of it
3) American cheese
4) pumpkin pie made from the recipe on a can
5) cranberry sauce from the can, including circular indentations from the can on the sauce.
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  #32  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:52 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glassy
Hmm. Do you have a recipe for that, lissener? It sounds really good.

--Jennifer
No, sorry, I don't. I'm gonna cook down some rhubarb with some sugar; or maybe honey. Then I'm gonna line the bottom of a custard dish (i.e. casserole) with it. I'll do this the day before so it's cooled off. Then I'll pour a rich cream-based flan over that and bake it. Then I'll whimper while it cools and eat it. Probly make some rum or bourbon whipped cream for it.
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  #33  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:53 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardentraveler
The cheescake recipe would be appreciated. Also the rhubarb flan.

Your whole menu sounds fabulous, lissener. Did you find all the recipes in one place, are they your inventions, or...??

GT
THese are inventions. A couple of them I've done before; some of them will be experiments.
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  #34  
Old 11-15-2005, 08:56 PM
lissener lissener is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cervaise
Speaking as one who has enjoyed his kitchen wizardry, I'll confirm he's a culinary artist, and I'd be surprised if his recipes come from anywhere but his own noggin. I'm a competent cook; he's amazing.
Cervaise flatters me. It would be way more accurate to say that he has graciously served as one of my kitchen guinea pigs on occasion. He is very politely not mentioning the experiments that have failed. . . .
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  #35  
Old 11-20-2005, 08:15 PM
Skott Skott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltypig
How about a Thai pumpkin curry? Yum!
That sounds interesting... have you had some? Or have a recipe? Or something similar, like thai butternut squash curry? Sounds very much like something I'm looking for.
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  #36  
Old 11-20-2005, 09:38 PM
Glassy Glassy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
No, sorry, I don't. I'm gonna cook down some rhubarb with some sugar; or maybe honey. Then I'm gonna line the bottom of a custard dish (i.e. casserole) with it. I'll do this the day before so it's cooled off. Then I'll pour a rich cream-based flan over that and bake it. Then I'll whimper while it cools and eat it. Probly make some rum or bourbon whipped cream for it.
Well, thank you for the description, anyway; it sounds truly delicious. The tart rhubarb sounds like a perfect foil for creamy custard - and I love anything custardy. I'll try it sometime.
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  #37  
Old 11-20-2005, 10:26 PM
AuntiePam AuntiePam is offline
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For my son's first Thanksgiving with his wife's family (they live in Seattle), they did Asian hot pot dishes. His in-laws are great cooks. I wish I lived close enough to be invited.

This chocolate cake isn't fancy, but it's moist, easy, and delicious.

Cake:
1 pkg. chocolate cake mix
3 eggs
1 can (21 oz.) Wilderness cherry pie filling

Frosting:
1 c. sugar
5 tbsp. butter
1/3 c. milk
1 pkg. (6 oz.) semi-sweet chocolate chips

Combine cake mix, egg and cherry pie filling. Mix until blended. Pour into greased and floured 9 x 13 inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes or until cake springs back when touched.

Frosting:

In a small saucepan combine sugar, butter and milk; bring to a boil, stirring constantly, cook 1 minute. Remove from heat; stir in chocolate until melted and spread over the cake.

It's from one of those Betty Crocker contest cookbooks. Somebody won 25K for this recipe.
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  #38  
Old 11-20-2005, 10:32 PM
Rick Rick is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnac the Magnificent!
Whatever is served, there needs to be a 10-year hiatus on:

1) sweet potatoes with marshmallows (aka "candied yams")
2) green bean casseroles with any Durkee canned product on top of it
3) American cheese
4) pumpkin pie made from the recipe on a can
5) cranberry sauce from the can, including circular indentations from the can on the sauce.
OK I am down with 1, 2, 3 (shudder), and 5.
But I cannot suport you on #4 unless you can offer a better recipe. If you can I will be all over it.
Anyone? Bueller?


Quote:
Originally Posted by lissener
And I'll be hunkered down in the corner like Gollum, with rib bones sticking out of my snarfling mouth.
Thanks for the very funny mental picture. If you ever need another kitchen recipe tester let me know.
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  #39  
Old 11-20-2005, 10:43 PM
GingerOfTheNorth GingerOfTheNorth is offline
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I made a butternut squash kugel to take to the in-law's for Thanksgiving. The mother-in-law wants nothing to do with it.

Every time we make turkey, we make The Purple Stuff. It's red cabbage, shredded, cooked on top of the stove with a cup of butter, a cup of sugar, and a cup of white vinegar. Sort of a sweet-and-sour sauerkraut, only edible. It goes really well with turkey, and it's pretty, too.
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  #40  
Old 11-20-2005, 10:52 PM
jackelope jackelope is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2001
Unusual Thanksgiving dinner: One year when I was in my early 20s, my father and uncle and I spent Thanksgiving at Hooters, eating wings and drinking beer and watching football. And ogling waitresses and tipping mightily, of course.

I'm not going to pretend I didn't enjoy that.
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  #41  
Old 11-21-2005, 11:02 AM
AuntiePam AuntiePam is offline
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Join Date: Aug 1999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick
OK I am down with 1, 2, 3 (shudder), and 5.
But I cannot suport you on #4 unless you can offer a better recipe. If you can I will be all over it.
Anyone? Bueller?
Me too. I imagine fresh pumpkin is preferable, but with all the other work that goes into making dinner, using canned pumpkin should be acceptable. Heck, most of us only eat the pie as a conveyor for the whipped cream topping anyway.
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  #42  
Old 11-21-2005, 11:52 AM
Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 13,290
My family has instructed me to make the green bean and Durkee onion casserole. *sigh*
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  #43  
Old 11-21-2005, 12:23 PM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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Join Date: Mar 1999
Location: Somewhere in the Potomac
Posts: 26,497
Happened to catch this on Food Network recently: Pumpkin Soup a la Rachel Ray.
Quote:
Originally Posted by A.R. Cane
Turducken was all the rage a few years back. I'm sure it would make for a memorable dinner.

http://www.culinarycafe.com/Holiday_...Turducken.html
Why bother with all that when preassembled Turduckens can be bought in stores?
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  #44  
Old 11-21-2005, 08:06 PM
Skott Skott is offline
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Join Date: Mar 1999
I have to agree with what someone else mentioned previously: Most people don't take the time to deal with a soup course at Thanksgiving. At least, that's what I've found the few times I've done it. It's really good otherwise.
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  #45  
Old 11-21-2005, 11:58 PM
adhemar adhemar is online now
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brynda
I would love to see the Roasted Squash recipe. Hint, hint.
2 medium butternut squash (4 to 5 lbs total)
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

preheat oven to 400 degrees
cut off and discard ends of each butternut squash. Peel the squash, cut in half lengthwise, and remove seeds.
cut into 1 1/4 to 1 1/2- inch cubes and place on a baking sheet. Add the melted butter, sugar, salt and pepper. With clean hands, toss all the ingrediants together and spread in a sigle layer on th baking sheet. Roast for 45 to 55 minutes until squash is tender and glaze starys to caramelize. While roasting, turn the squash a few times with a Spatula, to be sure it browns evenly.
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