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  #1  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:05 AM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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In praise of linguica

Have we, by chance, any linguica fans here?

For the unitiated, linguica is a Portuguese pork sausage. There's a spicier version called chourico, and it, too, is heavenly, but linguica is sausage perfection. It's tough to find in this area, but very prevalent in California and New England. There was a sandwich place in Newburyport, Mass., that had a great view of the water and served a linguica sandwich a jus - it's been fifteen years since I had it and my mouth still waters at the memory.

I've actually gone so far as to order linguica on-line, because I haven't found a good local source here in the DC area.

And for some reason, this morning the thought of linguica flashed through my mind, and I thought I'd see if I was alone in this particular fetish.
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  #2  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:10 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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I've never heard of linguica, but chourico...mmmm. I may have to try the linguica just because.

Easy to get in New England, you say? Well, it just so happens Vermont is only 30 miles eastwards, can you get it there? If not I have easy access to MA, CT, and NH and RI.
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  #3  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:14 AM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anaamika
I've never heard of linguica, but chourico...mmmm. I may have to try the linguica just because.

Easy to get in New England, you say? Well, it just so happens Vermont is only 30 miles eastwards, can you get it there? If not I have easy access to MA, CT, and NH and RI.
I don't know. My experience has been with the coastal areas in Massachusetts and Connecticut. I could tell you salivating stories of linguica served up in Groton, New London, and Mystic, but I'm not so sure about Vermont or New Hampshire.

But -- I'll have a chance to find out. I'm going to spend a week in Lebanon, NH this month. So I'll report on the linguica situation.
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  #4  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:23 AM
Anaamika Anaamika is offline
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Well, NH's a bit far away, or I would offer to buy you a cup of joe. Hope you have fun, though.

And hey, others can answer, too! Yoohoo! This isn't a private thread!
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  #5  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:40 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Both linguica and chourico are available in the supermarkets of southern New Hampshire. Mrs. Fear is a big fan, and introduced me to linguica several years ago.

I received the meat grinder/sausage stuffing attachments for our Kitchen Aid mixer for Christmas, and look forward to making home-made linguica soon.
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  #6  
Old 01-03-2006, 11:26 AM
pFd pFd is offline
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Just popping in to say I lurvve both linguica and chourico (i always thought it was courizo)!
Plus I got a good giggle out of the Google ad for "Suasage stuffers"...
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  #7  
Old 01-03-2006, 01:41 PM
Not A Tame Lion Not A Tame Lion is offline
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Linguica--a certified form of ambrosia. Many of the pizza restaurants here in the Bay Area include linguica among their toppings, and I always get some on my pizza when I can. I like it in omelets, too. All hail linguica!
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  #8  
Old 01-03-2006, 01:50 PM
VernWinterbottom VernWinterbottom is offline
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Huge Portuguese population here in Southeastern Massachusetts. Im within 15 minutes of several linguica manufacturers. The biggies are Gaspars, Amarals, and Furtados.

You can order online from Gaspars Linguica Co.
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  #9  
Old 01-03-2006, 02:04 PM
brownie55 brownie55 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bricker
I don't know. My experience has been with the coastal areas in Massachusetts and Connecticut. I could tell you salivating stories of linguica served up in Groton, New London, and Mystic, but I'm not so sure about Vermont or New Hampshire.

But -- I'll have a chance to find out. I'm going to spend a week in Lebanon, NH this month. So I'll report on the linguica situation.
I was in the New London area for two years and missed it. I don't miss food very often, and damn, that stuff sounds yummy.

Next time I am passing through those linguicas better look out.
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  #10  
Old 01-03-2006, 02:12 PM
BrainGlutton BrainGlutton is offline
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Is it any different from Spanish/Cuban chorizo?

And why is it called linguica? (The name seems to suggest it's made from tongue.)
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  #11  
Old 01-03-2006, 02:14 PM
butler1850 butler1850 is offline
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Any Shaws should have it. I've seen it in many IGA markets. Demoulas/Market Basket should also carry it if there are any in your area. It's usually in with the kielbasa, and the hotdogs. It's red.
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2006, 04:11 PM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrainGlutton
Is it any different from Spanish/Cuban chorizo?

And why is it called linguica? (The name seems to suggest it's made from tongue.)
There's a certain similarity to chorizo, but it's not identical by any means. I'm not sure what spices go into linguica, but it's not the same mix as chorizo.

And I truthfully have no clue what the origins of the word are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Not A Tame Lion
Linguica--a certified form of ambrosia. Many of the pizza restaurants here in the Bay Area include linguica among their toppings, and I always get some on my pizza when I can. I like it in omelets, too. All hail linguica!
Oh, I had forgotten about linguica pizza. There was a place in Groton that did a linguica white pizza that the gods themselves did tremble over.
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  #13  
Old 01-03-2006, 05:06 PM
Caffeine.addict Caffeine.addict is online now
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There is a Portuguese Market in Arlington on the corner of Washington Blvd and North Pershing, have you checked there.

Here is a Washington Post article about the place. They do have a nice butcher section and I have had some of their sausage which is pretty good.
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  #14  
Old 01-03-2006, 08:43 PM
Johnny Angel Johnny Angel is offline
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BrainGlutton wrote:

Quote:
And why is it called linguica? (The name seems to suggest it's made from tongue.)
The recipe cited uses ground pork, but the name is suspiciously indicative. I mean, hell, I'm a big fan of liver sausage, so who am I to complain. But tongue sausage?
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Old 01-03-2006, 08:59 PM
Caffeine.addict Caffeine.addict is online now
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I'll have to confirm with my old man the next time I talk to him, but I think that linguica is jst portuguese for sausage. I've had it before and I'm pretty sure it isn't tongue.
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  #16  
Old 01-03-2006, 09:06 PM
VernWinterbottom VernWinterbottom is offline
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The Gaspar's website says lean pork, vinegar, garlic and paprika. I know there's non-fat dry milk in it, too, though they don't mention it. With that homemade recipe, you won't get a strong enough flavor without the garlic. The authentic stuff around here is made from chunks of meat, not ground.

I seriously think there's aren't enough tongues to produce the amounts of linguica and chourico that are found around here.

True story: About 20 years ago I lived in an apartment in a farmhouse owned by an older Portuguese woman who had a huge hog out back. One morning I was awakened by screams from hell, only to discover the whole family had come over and slaughtered the porker in the yard. A week or so later I went downstairs to pay my rent. There were yards of sausage hanging up in the kitchen. . .
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  #17  
Old 01-03-2006, 09:25 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrainGlutton
And why is it called linguica? (The name seems to suggest it's made from tongue.)
The American Heritage Dictionary says the etymology is not from any tongue ingredients, it is from a Latin root:
Quote:
Portuguese, probably ultimately from Late Latin longao, large intestine, from longus, long.
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  #18  
Old 01-03-2006, 10:40 PM
Ephemera Ephemera is online now
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A locally owned pizza shop here in town offers it as one of their toppings and I had it last year and was unimpressed. It tasted pretty much just like the little balls of sausage you get from any other chain pizzeria.
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  #19  
Old 01-04-2006, 02:48 PM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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To save some potential embarassment if you stroll into the grocery store to find it:

lin-GWE-sah

NOT lin-GUI-ka
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  #20  
Old 01-04-2006, 05:15 PM
Excalibre Excalibre is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bricker
To save some potential embarassment if you stroll into the grocery store to find it:

lin-GWE-sah

NOT lin-GUI-ka
Should I assume that it's actually spelled "linguia", then, with a cedilla?
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  #21  
Old 01-04-2006, 06:21 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pFd
Just popping in to say I lurvve both linguica and chourico (i always thought it was courizo)!
Plus I got a good giggle out of the Google ad for "Suasage stuffers"...
Then, pFd, you must know of the Neto Sausage Company up in Santa Clara, a low-rent Portuguese sausage shop which sets up a 'que in their parking lot on Fridays and sells barbequed linguica sandwiches . . .
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2006, 08:55 PM
VernWinterbottom VernWinterbottom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Excalibre
Should I assume that it's actually spelled "linguia", then, with a cedilla?
Although both probably should be spelled with one, chourio, pronounced Shoo-REES, rolling the R, is usually spelled with a cedilla. Generally I don't see linguica spelled with one, though.

Maybe more people tend to want to use a hard C when it's followed by O than when its followed by A.
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  #23  
Old 01-07-2006, 03:38 PM
ms.deanna ms.deanna is offline
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ooh yeah , lingiuca, me encanta y chorizo y longaniza, tambien . que rico!
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  #24  
Old 01-07-2006, 10:25 PM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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Rick, my ex-wife used to make a "lasagna" using crescent roll dough for the top and bottom and a stuffing made of linguica, fresh cheese, and other typical lasagna ingredients. It was out of this world.

I like linguica anytime I can get it. Not often found in Ohio.
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  #25  
Old 01-08-2006, 05:25 AM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DSYoungEsq
Rick, my ex-wife used to make a "lasagna" using crescent roll dough for the top and bottom and a stuffing made of linguica, fresh cheese, and other typical lasagna ingredients. It was out of this world.

I like linguica anytime I can get it. Not often found in Ohio.
Oh, yum. That sounds like something to try.

I'm going to the Arlington Portugese market mentioned above and see what I find. My trip to New Hampsire just got delayed for a couple weeks, but now the linguica spirit moves me.
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  #26  
Old 01-08-2006, 07:23 PM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bricker
Oh, yum. That sounds like something to try.

I'm going to the Arlington Portugese market mentioned above and see what I find. My trip to New Hampsire just got delayed for a couple weeks, but now the linguica spirit moves me.
There is a song in there, somewhere...
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  #27  
Old 01-08-2006, 07:50 PM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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I just had an amazing dinner, my wife cooked home-made Portuguese Kale Soup, a hearty concoction with both linguica and chourico, potatoes, kidney beans and lots of kale in a delicious tomato broth. She is a New Bedford girl, and her recipe is a family heirloom from her Cape Verde ancestors. I contributed Portuguese White Bread , kneaded in my bread machine, but baked in the oven. Not as good as hand-kneaded, but still a pretty good loaf. Two bowls of soup took the chill out of a New Hampshire winter's eve, and now I am looking forward to some serious time in the La-Z-Boy to digest. Fortunately, she doubled her recipe, so there is lots left over to freeze for the rest of the winter. Come to think of it, Kale Soup was the first meal she prepared for me when we were dating, proving the adage about the way to a man's heart. If anyone is interested, I'm sure she would share the recipe. For the soup, not my heart, that's spoke for.
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  #28  
Old 01-08-2006, 09:53 PM
Bricker Bricker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fear Itself
If anyone is interested, I'm sure she would share the recipe. For the soup, not my heart, that's spoke for.
Please -- recipe!
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  #29  
Old 01-09-2006, 01:19 AM
Voyager Voyager is offline
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Our town's yearly Art & Wine festival has a couple of stands selling it. Very yummy! Never had it before moving to California, but I like it.
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  #30  
Old 01-09-2006, 08:01 AM
Fear Itself Fear Itself is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bricker
Please -- recipe!
She said she would work on it today, the recipe is an oral tradition handed down from her mother, who taught her to cook by taste and eyeball, not so much by measurements. She will come up with the basic proportions though.
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  #31  
Old 01-09-2006, 09:16 AM
Plynck Plynck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VernWinterbottom
Although both probably should be spelled with one, chourio, pronounced Shoo-REES, rolling the R, is usually spelled with a cedilla. Generally I don't see linguica spelled with one, though.

Maybe more people tend to want to use a hard C when it's followed by O than when its followed by A.
It's curious, but the final "o" in chourio tends to get dropped in speech. For those who include it, it takes an "oo" sound.

Linguica makes a terrific sandwich. I find chourio is best as an an accent to dishes or omelets.

My wife was Portuguese, from the Azores. Through her I developed a love for linguica, chourio, kale soup, fennel soup, sweet bread (which is not the same as sweet breads ), passion fruit, and Portuguese cheeses. Whenever I am in Taunton, I try to get to one of the Portuguese stores there and stock up.

If you ever find yourself in a Portuguese restaurant, try the carne alentejana (Pork and Littleneck Clams) if it is on the menu; it is amazing.

Oh, and my wife's family used to slaughter a pig when she was young. Not long after we were married we saw "Tree of Wooden Clogs", and the slaughtering scene in the movie brought back all the traumatic memories.
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  #32  
Old 01-09-2006, 11:22 AM
jsc1953 jsc1953 is offline
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I was raised on the stuff (my mother's parents were Azorean immigrants), and thank God you can get it in every supermarket in the Bay Area. I love it fried as a side dish with pancakes. And as a pizza topping.

(Plynck: Mom used to hide under the bed when pigs were being slaughtered).
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