The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:45 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Best small pocket knife.

For my brother in law.

This is for a gift exchange. My BIL is 60+- years old. He was a shop teacher. He knows his tools.

He is losing his sight. He can no longer drive.

I carry a small Buck lock blade with a plastic handle that I like very much. I have carried a small knife all my life. I know how personal and important a knife can be.

But. Instead of buying my BIL another pair of slippers or something, I think that a nice pocket knife would be great. Nothing more than a 2Ē blade.

So. I would like to get him something a little special. Say $50-$150. Quality is paramount, and I would also like something that has a bright handle. Perhaps inlaid.

Buck knives have worked for me. But I think there are some dopers here that may have better suggestions.
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:57 PM
Suburban Plankton Suburban Plankton is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
How about a Swiss Army Knife? Victoriox, one of two official manufacturers, has 14 different models in a wide range of prices.

I would definitely classify the red coloring as "bright", and the Swiss Army logo is inlaid...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-25-2006, 07:03 PM
Common Tater Common Tater is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Swiss Army knife is an excellent choice, but something to think about (though without the requisite bright handle) might be the Leatherman pocket tool - and similar if not better designed clones produced by Gerber and others...
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-25-2006, 07:03 PM
Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor Bosda Di'Chi of Tricor is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Dogpatch/Middle TN.
Posts: 28,596
Swiss Army is the best, & their stainless steel blades are great.
__________________
FRIENDS! ROMANS! COUNTRY BUMPKINS!
Lend me your auditory canals!
Ask not what your clones can do for you, but what you can do for country music!
Never in the field of conflict was so much owed by so many who only had a few!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-25-2006, 07:16 PM
silenus silenus is offline
Hoc nomen meum verum non est.
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 40,480
A previous thread on the subject, with lots of good choices.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-25-2006, 08:07 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Good thoughts all. I carried a Swiss Army knife for many years. Just a two blade job. Good knife. Though I feel they are a bit weak. Nice and light though. Kept an edge. Loved it.

My first knife was a Browning, with three blades. Many moons ago.

I had this Buck Ė years ago. It was quite a fine knife. And is the knife I think I will buy for my BIL. Not too big or small.

I now carry a similar Buck knife, but it has a plastic handle. It's been great,

Please continue with other ideas for good knives.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-25-2006, 08:29 PM
China Guy China Guy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 9,368
What does your BIL use a knife for? IMHO, a Swiss Army Knife has it's uses but not for a serious blade guy. For example, you would never use a Swiss Army knife for whittling. It's a thin stainless steel blade that does not have the strength, endge holding or even sharpness of a real steel blade.

Also, real steel blade knife guys tend to fall in either the two blade or three blade camp. I would recommend getting a knife from whichever camp BIL is in, assuming that steel blades are his preference.

Buck's can be tricky or involved to sharpen. I think Buck's naturally fit a certain % of the knife owning population and are meh to another %.

Actually, I haven't had a good whittling knife for many years. I'd love to see recomendations on this board. Damn airport security sucked up all my pocket knives including 2 whittling knives, swiss army money clip with blade, a couple of swiss army knives, etc. My pet security peeve, why is it so hard to not have an envelope/stamp vending machine and mailbox off to the side? That way the little stuff that won't go through security can still be mailed and saved. Some of my knives had serious sentimental value, carried them or used them for years, and then the choice is making an international non refundable flight or saving the knife. Bastards.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-25-2006, 08:53 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
I see a knife as a tool for cutting rope, tape, boxes, bagels, wrapping paper, butter or cream cheese.

Or cleaning battery terminals or striping wire in a pinch.

I see a knife as nothing but a tool. I believe my BIL sees it as the same.

I also understand China Guy. I have had 4 pocket knives in 45 yearsÖÖ It really hurts to loose one.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-25-2006, 09:00 PM
silenus silenus is offline
Hoc nomen meum verum non est.
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 40,480
Get him something from Spyderco.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-25-2006, 09:19 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Also, I wonder China Guy Why Buck Knives may be hard to sharpen?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-25-2006, 09:27 PM
China Guy China Guy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 9,368
That last Buck I had was 30 years ago. You needed to sharpen at the correct angle to really put an edge on it. I never really got the hang of how to put on the edge by hand. Buck sold special sharpening case guides to hold the blade at the coorect angle, specialized whet stones and sharpening oil just for the Buck. At that time, I also had a Gerber that was much more a natural fit for me, and way easier to sharpen.

I was used to el cheapo hardware store pocket sized whet stone you could spit on and put a serious whittling edge on a jack knife.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-25-2006, 10:01 PM
feppytweed feppytweed is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
I have this Swiss Army Knife. It isn't bright red, but is a fabulous knife. I carry it everywhere. Very handy.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-25-2006, 10:13 PM
Rick Rick is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Posts: 15,542
I carried a Kershaw Black Horse for several years. Very nice knife.
You might look at this one.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:59 AM
Unregistered Bull Unregistered Bull is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Look over the retail knife sites for anything from Victorinox or Spyderco. A Victorinox Soldier and Spyderco Delica are the two best pocket knives that I've owned. And I've owned a lot.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-26-2006, 02:19 AM
kinoons kinoons is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
I currently carry the spyderco mini-dyad for daily small knife use. They are out of production, so may be a bit tough to come across, but I love it.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-26-2006, 09:05 AM
astro astro is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Re small, very high quality, interestting knives with superior steel these are very nice & usually retail for 37 dollars or so, but can be had more cheaply on ebay.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-26-2006, 09:42 AM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Thanks everyone. The Spydercos just don't look like something my BIL would carry. And though I like Swiss Army, I would prefer to give him a lock back.

Still leaning towards a small Buck.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-26-2006, 11:44 AM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Great Black Swamp
Posts: 9,178
Case knives are good quality blades and intermediately priced, they also have some very appealing and fancier handles made of a variety of materials.

If you want a German quality knife at competitive prices I recommend BŲker knives. They also have some really beautiful handles in elegant and traditional designs and materials.

Lately, on ebay I have noticed a lot of these 2006 Winchester 3 knife (Gerber) burl handle collector's boxes. They look like beautiful knives and have been going at very low prices so that might be an option for you. Although, if they are selling cheaply on ebay, then you can proabbly find them at a bargain somewhere else on the internet, so I suggest searching elsewhere before you commit to an ebay auction.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:10 PM
LSLGuy LSLGuy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Miami, Florida USA
Posts: 6,312
If your BIL is strictly utilitarian, you can't beat a basic Buck.

If on the other hand he might appreciate a more specialty tool, something a little over-engineered for his needs, consider this:

I've carried a small Boker ceramic for years (similar to this http://www.agrussell.com/knives/by_m...s_folder.html). Mine is an early ceramic & not suitable for prying or whittling. But for daily light duty it works slick and has (I think) a certain cachet lacking in a standard Buck lockback.

These folks seem to have the entire Boker line for easy comparison on one page http://www.agrussell.com/knives/by_m...h_d/boker.html

If ceramic or ceramic Titanium is out, consider they also have a bunch of Damascus blades. Good edge-holding, good strength & very attractive in an understated way.
__________________
The day we stopped being "citizens" and started being "consumers" was the beginning of the End of Western Civilization.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:39 PM
Testy Testy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
I've got a small Gerber, very thin, with about a 2 inch blade. The bolsters are brass and there are rosewood inserts in the handle. It has a back-lock. I refer to it as my "gentleman's knife." Anyway, I've had it for 20+ years and wouldn't take anything for it. Very handy little knife and highly recommended if he has occasional use for a knife but isn't going to be putting it through hard usage every day.

Testy
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11-26-2006, 02:04 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Given the criteria of size, quality and beauty I would recommend a benchmade 310 benchmite. It has a 2" blade and the handle is a work of art. It locks in both positions and the blade is 154CM steel. The handle has a different design on each side (cut all the way through it) and one of the designs incorporates the release mechanism. You can order different colors and I would recommend the anodized blue. This is a one-of-a-kind knife that I guarantee will be appreciated. It may be discontinued but you should still be able to get one. There is an auto-version of it (3100) but it's more expensive.

People who like knives drool over this one when they see it.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-26-2006, 02:53 PM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Great Black Swamp
Posts: 9,178
Another great, very high quality, classic German knife that I can vouch for is Puma brand Knives.

This little Mother of Pearl Beauty is going for a steal.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-26-2006, 10:53 PM
sunstone sunstone is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Southwest USA
Posts: 1,194
Given his age and familiarity with tools, quality and (probably) a traditional pocketknife are important. Case should have a knife that fits. I would suggest a bone handle and either a rancher, stockman or trapper style Can you tell that I collect Case knives?
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11-27-2006, 05:16 AM
Mellivora capensis Mellivora capensis is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: South Africa
Posts: 1,085
Probably more a novelty than anything else, but I was given this for my birthday.
http://www.toollogic.com/ice2.htm

It really is the same size as a credit card, just thicker.

Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 11-27-2006, 08:05 AM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver
Given the criteria of size, quality and beauty I would recommend a benchmade 310 benchmite. It has a 2" blade and the handle is a work of art. It locks in both positions and the blade is 154CM steel. The handle has a different design on each side (cut all the way through it) and one of the designs incorporates the release mechanism. You can order different colors and I would recommend the anodized blue. This is a one-of-a-kind knife that I guarantee will be appreciated. It may be discontinued but you should still be able to get one. There is an auto-version of it (3100) but it's more expensive.

People who like knives drool over this one when they see it.
That's nice! Decisions, decisions.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 11-27-2006, 08:51 PM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Great Black Swamp
Posts: 9,178
Quote:
Originally Posted by China Guy
Actually, I haven't had a good whittling knife for many years. I'd love to see recomendations on this board.
Last year I decided to maybe try my hand at whittling. So, I asked for and received this BŲker Tang Stamp Series Whittler (7th Knife from the top) for Christmas. It is a beautiful carbon steel knife that will hold a great edge if and when I can master sharpening technique and get the proper carving edge.

I really want to try carving but never really got into it because I didn't have the right wood and I suck at getting a keen edge, it started to seem an excercise in futility and I lost the interest and ambition to pursue it. (I'm notoriously bad at holding an interest for long, my passions come and go and I lack the discipline to really buckle down and commit, sometimes.) But good news is, I'm practicing my sharpening technique on a relatively cheap knife and I feel the urge, so maybe I'll get back to it.

However, if my BŲker Whittler is excellent, then this special BŲker Whittler's Penknife designed by a wood carver has to be the best.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 11-27-2006, 09:04 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla
That's nice! Decisions, decisions.
Did I mention it was less than 1/4 inch thick? It carriers very well in a pants pocket. It has the heft of a metal handled knife but is lighter because the design is cut all the way through.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 11-29-2006, 06:39 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magiver
Did I mention it was less than 1/4 inch thick? It carriers very well in a pants pocket. It has the heft of a metal handled knife but is lighter because the design is cut all the way through.
Well, that's a damn shame. It seems to be discontinued. But would have been perfect.

I swear. Most of these knives look to be hunting tools.

I carry a nice little Buck. Lock back. And It's not like carrying a .45 in you pocket. My workmates, nice guys and all and hunters, sometimes carry a knife. The damn things are so big that it stuns me when they happen to be able to dig it out of their pockect to cut some tape on a box.

Shit, you carry that thing in your pocket? We are GIS PROGRAMMERS. We live in the mountains but really, Taco Bell is just a mile away from work.

Still looking.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 11-29-2006, 07:44 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla
Well, that's a damn shame. It seems to be discontinued. But would have been perfect.

I swear. Most of these knives look to be hunting tools.

I carry a nice little Buck. Lock back. And It's not like carrying a .45 in you pocket. My workmates, nice guys and all and hunters, sometimes carry a knife. The damn things are so big that it stuns me when they happen to be able to dig it out of their pockect to cut some tape on a box.

Shit, you carry that thing in your pocket? We are GIS PROGRAMMERS. We live in the mountains but really, Taco Bell is just a mile away from work.

Still looking.
Yeh of little faith. You can buy the 3100 (automatic version) for $100. Got me thinking about it.

I have 2 more suggestions. My favorite daily knife is a Sog Flash I. It has a 2 1/2 aus-8 steel blade with either a glass-reinforced Zytel handle or an aluminum handle. Aus-8 is slightly less hard than 154CM but still in the range you want for a knife. A hardness of 60 becomes hard to sharpen and is too brittle for my taste. This knife is a partial assist knife. When you start to open it it will flick open. It locks open and has a safety lock when closed. You can get half serrated blades and also black anodized blades. I like the longer handle/blade but that's my personal choice in a knife. I also like the lightweight zytel handle. It's a very light knife at 1.3 oz but the aluminum is very attractive. I have 2 of them and the one I carry has the safety lock and clip removed. $55 plus shipping.

Another knife to consider is a Kershaw Chive and here, The picture does nothing for sales. The plain one has a very classic/clean look to it. It comes in a variety of handles and the blade is 2 inch 440HC steel (similar to the aus-8 in hardness). It is also a partial assist knife but the way it's designed it might as well be an automatic. The way it is opened is very simple and unique. If you look at the blade you see the base of the sharp edge side sticks out. When folded this tang sticks out the back of the knife. Press on it and it flies open. It also has a safey lock and it's needed. You do not want this opening in your pocket because the point is very narrow. I would carry this knife all the time but I like to be able to open a knife without releasing any safety locks. At 1.9 oz it has some heft to it and a very nice clip is included. Well designed and well built. $30 plus shipping. The best bang for the buck by far. You can get him a new 3 cell maglight mini LED (3 watt) for $28 and he'll be equally impressed by it.

By the way, I didn't mean to do this but everything I listed is made in the USA.

There you go. My top 3 most favorite knives that aren't automatic.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 11-29-2006, 10:15 PM
NajaNivea NajaNivea is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
As per the thread silenus beat me to posting, I love, love, love my Buck Alpha Dorado and have used it daily since I bought it.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 11-30-2006, 12:03 AM
Dag Otto Dag Otto is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla

I carry a nice little Buck. Lock back. And It's not like carrying a .45 in you pocket. My workmates, nice guys and all and hunters, sometimes carry a knife. The damn things are so big that it stuns me when they happen to be able to dig it out of their pockect to cut some tape on a box.

Check this out for a nice little knife. Simple, nice to hold in your hand. The basic Opinel . The stainless (Inox) models are nice.

A Laguiole knife seems to be a pleasure to hold also.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 11-30-2006, 08:22 AM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Magiver What's an 'automatic' version. Is it when they put the little thumb button on the blade to open it? (had one once, and I'm afraid I really hated it. It's now my glove compartment knife)
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 11-30-2006, 03:30 PM
MacTech MacTech is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Sector ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha
Posts: 5,668
I have to add my reccomendation for a Spyderco as well, despite their "unique" appearance, they are *cutting* tools par excellence

Spyderco concentrates on ergonomics and functionality *first*, appearance/cosmetics are an afterthought, many people initially find the appearance of a Spydie off-putting, but once you have one in your hand and actually *cut* with it, you understand, Spydercos are a great example of form following function

Sal Glesser, President of Spyderco, put it this way;
"we would rather the knife be in your pocket, because it *works* better, rather than in your display case because it *looks* better"
"Sorry, we design for performance, not collectability"
"Tractors don't have to look like Ferraris"

nowhere is this philosophy more apparent than in the Spyderco Dodo, sadly, it's discontinued because the general public saw it as nothing more than a "boxcutter on steroids", the Dodo is one of the most ergonomic knives i've ever used, the handle fits the hand perfectly, the balance is spot-on, the blade is razor-sharp (Scary-Sharp), the G-10 handles are grippy, a great blade, and thanks to the combination of the serrated SpyderEdge and the "Reverse-S" blade profile, it cuts like a knife twice it's blade length (the blade is just shy of 2")

give a Spydie an honest chance, it's a true, unpretentious *tool* knife, if you don't like the "humpback" look of the Delica, why not try the Native, which has a more conventional "humpless" blade shape
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 11-30-2006, 06:56 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
I agree, MacTech that a knife is a tool first. But for a gift for a conservative older gentleman, I don't see that a strictly business, serated blade knife is quite right.

I myself have never carried a serated blade. How the heck to you sharpen them?

He does carry a knife as an everyday tool.. So maybe I am wrong here. I wish I new what kind of knife he does carry. He's a Dockers and button down shirt kind of guy. Retired.

And, for myself, and I suppose him, a knife is a very personal choice. I am always quite sad when I loose a knife. It's like a good friend. So I don't know if he will take it up and carry what I buy. But. As I said in my OP, it's better than another pair of slippers or something.

I'm not looking at Laguigle too...bit expensive tho. Thanks Dag Otto.

I'm looking at all of them. It's become a bit of a quest.

Thank you for all you replies.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 11-30-2006, 07:24 PM
MacTech MacTech is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Sector ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha
Posts: 5,668
the Spyderco Sharpmaker, it's sharpening stones are triangular, you sharpen serrated edges on the corners of the triangle stones

as far as a nice small "Gentelman's" folder, Spyderco has plenty of them, a couple of my favorites are the Kiwi, and the Cricket, the Kopa seems nice too, but it's outside my price range, all three of these knives are easily pocketable, the Kiwi and Cricket fit in the watch pocket of jeans easily.

the Kiwi has the best ergos of the two i have (Cricket/Kiwi), take a look at those deep dual finger choils, the knife itself may be no longer than 3" closed, but when open, has one of the most secure grips of any pocketknife i have handled, the wharncliffe blade is dead easy to sharpen as well, and can get shaving sharp.

the Cricket is a good deal slimmer (if you remove the clip, you could actually fit it *inside* a wallet), the Reverse-S blade is a little harder to sharpen (i reccomend the Sharpmaker), but it also out-cuts the Kiwi due to a thinner blade grind (the Kiwi has a rather thick blade spine)

both knives are considered "cute" by NKP (Non Knife People, a.k.a. "Sheeple") and don't tend to scare most sheep like the standard Delica/Native/Endura/Harpy/etc...

most Spydies are available with plain edge as well as serrated, so if he doesn't care for serrations, not a problem

Here's a list of what Spyderco considers their "Gentelman" line, and these are "Little Big Knives", knives that are small in size, but *big* in cutting performance
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 11-30-2006, 08:48 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla
Magiver What's an 'automatic' version. Is it when they put the little thumb button on the blade to open it? (had one once, and I'm afraid I really hated it. It's now my glove compartment knife)
Automatic means it's a switchblade knife. Partial assist or semi-assist means it is partially spring loaded and requires that you move the blade out manually first and it extends the rest of the way. The semi-assist should be legal in all 50 states while the auto is legal in some states as long as the blade is 2" or less.

The 2 alternate knives I suggested were semi-assist. The Kershaw Chive needs to be seen up close to appreciate it's design. I can't believe the crappy picture on the net. I would liken it to something with an art-deco feel to it. You will be buying one for yourself after you try it. If there are any knive shops in your area they should carry it.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 11-30-2006, 08:49 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Thank you again MacTech. Those Spydercos look real nice. And mostly in my price range.

Itís not the money, so much as I donít want to over-do it for a gift exchange. I saw a couple of knifes here in the $200 dollar range which would have been perfect, except for the price. I do not want to start some sort or one-upmenship in our family. Itís just a gift exchange.

My BIL had to retire early from his job as a shop teacher. He is loosing his eyesight. He can no longer drive at night, and probably should not drive at all. He needs bright light to read anything.

The folks that really know their knives are gonna hate me. I just bought (online) a Buck folder that has an LED light in it. This knife Itís bigger than I wanted, but may serve him quite well. Iíll look at it and if it is to cheesy or junk will go for a smaller traditional lock back like many of the knifes mentioned in this thread.

I myself (birthday tomorrow) may be interested in a knife such as this as I also have trouble in the dark with menus and receipts and such.

Itís a bitch to start to loose your vision. I need to have my Wife look at the Menu for me sometimes and Iím only 46. I saw the Buck with a light in it and thought.hmmmmÖ I would rather have a knife with a small light in it, than a flashlight with a small knife.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 11-30-2006, 09:43 PM
Magiver Magiver is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Quote:
Originally Posted by enipla
Thank you again MacTech. Those Spydercos look real nice. And mostly in my price range.

Itís not the money, so much as I donít want to over-do it for a gift exchange. I saw a couple of knifes here in the $200 dollar range which would have been perfect, except for the price. I do not want to start some sort or one-upmenship in our family. Itís just a gift exchange.

My BIL had to retire early from his job as a shop teacher. He is loosing his eyesight. He can no longer drive at night, and probably should not drive at all. He needs bright light to read anything.

The folks that really know their knives are gonna hate me. I just bought (online) a Buck folder that has an LED light in it. This knife Itís bigger than I wanted, but may serve him quite well. Iíll look at it and if it is to cheesy or junk will go for a smaller traditional lock back like many of the knifes mentioned in this thread.

I myself (birthday tomorrow) may be interested in a knife such as this as I also have trouble in the dark with menus and receipts and such.

Itís a bitch to start to loose your vision. I need to have my Wife look at the Menu for me sometimes and Iím only 46. I saw the Buck with a light in it and thought.hmmmmÖ I would rather have a knife with a small light in it, than a flashlight with a small knife.
Good choice. The blade is easy to sharpen and it's a dual-use tool. I carry a carabiner style flashlight for the same reason (I clip it to my laptop case at work so the keys go through the scanner). I use the flashlight all the time for the same reasons you gave. 48 sucks too.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 11-30-2006, 09:57 PM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Great Black Swamp
Posts: 9,178
That's a nice knife. I think it's a good and practical choice. Bucks are lifetime blades. (It's considerate too, in light of his failing eyesight.)
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12-01-2006, 08:55 PM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: The Great Black Swamp
Posts: 9,178
There are huge lots of Airport Confiscated Knives on ebay. You can get a bag of somebody else's knives cheap. I always thought it would be cool to buy a bag and find out the providence of each blade- somehow track down the original owners through a web lost and found. Give every knife back to the owner and learn its story. Document the whole process.

I'm sure there is an incredible story waiting to be told. Blades are a personal and meaningful item for men. Mars Bonfire.

Some knives might be untraceable, but I'm sure there are some blades easily recognized by their owner... storytelling blades. It's so Athurian. Tolkien Magic Steel.
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 12-01-2006, 09:59 PM
enipla enipla is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Colorado Rockies.
Posts: 8,237
Quote:
Originally Posted by devilsknew
I'm sure there is an incredible story waiting to be told. Blades are a personal and meaningful item for men.
Very true. Just about any tool can be. I was hesitant to buy a knife for my BIL. But. It is just a gift exchange. And something like a pocket knife can easily be re-gifted. Or thrown in a glove box or drawer for other uses.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright © 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.