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  #1  
Old 12-19-2006, 10:57 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Blow torch recipes?

In what recipes is a blow torch called for? I just got one as a gift, but my poor arteries can't handle creme brulee on a regular enough basis to justify owning one.

How long does it take to blow torch a frozen turkey to doneness?
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  #2  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:05 AM
Ponder Stibbons Ponder Stibbons is offline
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So you "can't handle creme brulee", eh? Well, to be honest, I'm not a big fan of creme brulee myself (regardless of diet restrictions), so I can't blame you one bit.

Still, I'd imagine a blow torch would be handy for any situation where you want something browned and crispy on top without cooking it any more. Anything topped with cheese, for example. If you've baked that perfect casserole but the top isn't what you want it to be, or you want to throw some cheese on their after the baking is done, just torch it a sec and and it'll be perfect.
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  #3  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:11 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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You could brown meringue or roast marshmellows. And burn Xmas Peeps!
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  #4  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:12 AM
Tapioca Dextrin Tapioca Dextrin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
How long does it take to blow torch a frozen turkey to doneness?
You could cook the outside of the turkey pretty quickly, leaving salmonella city on the inside. Stick to deep frying like a normal person.
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:18 AM
Madd Maxx Madd Maxx is offline
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Bananas foster can be ghetto made with a small torch. Basically anything you would fininsh in a salamander can be done with a small torch. Nachos, small pizzas, meringue, etc.
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  #6  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:21 AM
Malacandra Malacandra is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
How long does it take to blow torch a frozen turkey to doneness?
Unfeasibly long. A torch is intended for high temperature at a small point - not for transferring large amounts of thermal energy. It's the difference between a static spark (high voltage, minimal duration, low total energy) and a car battery (low voltage, much longer duration, much higher total energy).
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  #7  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:32 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponder Stibbons
So you "can't handle creme brulee", eh? Well, to be honest, I'm not a big fan of creme brulee myself (regardless of diet restrictions), so I can't blame you one bit.
Oh, I'm a fan. I'd swim in the stuff if I could. But the ingredients are:

Egg yolks
Heavy cream
Butter
Lard
Bacon grease
Crisco
Goose fat
WD-40
The Alaskan shore line
The entire sub-strata of Iraq
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  #8  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:37 AM
Ponder Stibbons Ponder Stibbons is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
Oh, I'm a fan. I'd swim in the stuff if I could. But the ingredients are:

Egg yolks
Heavy cream
Butter
Lard
Bacon grease
Crisco
Goose fat
WD-40
Heh heh.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
The Alaskan shore line
Heeeey ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
The entire sub-strata of Iraq
OK, now I'm starting to think you're making things up ...

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  #9  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:37 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madd Maxx
Bananas foster can be ghetto made with a small torch. Basically anything you would fininsh in a salamander can be done with a small torch. Nachos, small pizzas, meringue, etc.
It seems that anything I would put under the broiler for 2 minutes might work. A quick BBQ glaze, for instance.
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  #10  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:39 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponder Stibbons
Heh heh.
Heeeey ...
OK, now I'm starting to think you're making things up ...

Sometimes I omit the lard.
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  #11  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:40 AM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
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tdn -- We went to two restaurants in the past few months that had creme brulee, which I'd never had before, so we tried it. MilliCal loved it -- except for that hard-crackle sugar crust on the top (that's so hard to make and that some people die for). The second time we tried it, she insisted that someone else eat the crust off.
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  #12  
Old 12-19-2006, 11:53 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Oh dear -- the "crust" is the best part!
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  #13  
Old 12-19-2006, 12:41 PM
gigi gigi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas
And burn Xmas Peeps!
Oh the humanity!
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  #14  
Old 12-19-2006, 12:48 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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As God is my witness I thought Peeps were made of asbestos!
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  #15  
Old 12-19-2006, 04:46 PM
MissMossie MissMossie is offline
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If you're interested in expanding outside of the realm of cooking, small blow torches are great for lighting sets of fireworks with the fuses twisted together. I suggest making a Flaming Goat to go with it.

Is it the Forth of July yet?
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  #16  
Old 12-19-2006, 04:52 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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At sushi bars, I've seen them take a long 1" x 2" "stick" of raw tuna, and lightly "torch" it on all sides, slightly cooking and blackening the exterior. The interior remains transluscent, red and raw. Then they proceed to slice it for sashimi or sushi. It's topnotch with soy, lemon and finely sliced green onions.
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  #17  
Old 12-19-2006, 05:04 PM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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I image it would be great for roasting peppers. And if you have never done this, you are in for a treat.
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  #18  
Old 12-19-2006, 05:35 PM
MrJackboots MrJackboots is offline
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You can make very good rare steaks with a big-ish one, though if you want to do a Pittsburg rare, you want a welder's torch. Same idea, only even more so.
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  #19  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:00 PM
Baron Greenback Baron Greenback is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
It seems that anything I would put under the broiler for 2 minutes might work. A quick BBQ glaze, for instance.
Can I ask what a broiler is in the spirit of hands-across-the-ocean understanding?
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  #20  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:02 PM
Tapioca Dextrin Tapioca Dextrin is offline
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American Broiler = British Grill
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  #21  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:02 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is online now
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Big Trouble

INGREDIENTS

2 or more bored 10-year-olds
1 blowtorch
1 stray cat
1 can gasoline (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Blend and leave unattended.

Variation: Add Kool-Aid with grain alcohol or fortified wine before blending. Neighbor's dog or backyard shed may be substituted for stray cat.
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  #22  
Old 12-19-2006, 06:40 PM
kaylasdad99 kaylasdad99 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
In what recipes is a blow torch called for? I just got one as a gift, but my poor arteries can't handle creme brulee on a regular enough basis to justify owning one.

How long does it take to blow torch a frozen turkey to doneness?
Seems to me that with a handy-dandy blow torch you could buy yourself a lot of real estate on your kitchen counter that is presently being wasted on a toaster...
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  #23  
Old 12-19-2006, 08:58 PM
araminty araminty is offline
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Custard fireball!

ANYTHING fireball!

You just need a length of hose attached to a funnel. Put 2 spoons of powdered whatever (I've used cornflour/starch, custard mix and non-dairy creamer to great success) in the funnel, position the funnel under the blowtorch flame, and blow!

The sugar in the custard powder burns, giving a delightful roast marshmallowy smell.

So, its not exactly a recipe for food - it's a recipe for FUN!
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  #24  
Old 12-20-2006, 03:07 PM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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You could try making Irish coffee but I don't know where you'll get the asbestos gloves these days.
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  #25  
Old 12-20-2006, 03:11 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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Actually, last night I used it to crisp up some chicken skin that was looking a bit "wet."
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  #26  
Old 12-20-2006, 03:51 PM
Shalmanese Shalmanese is offline
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I got some good ideas when I asked the same thing on eGullet.

I don't like it for toasting bell peppers though. The torch is so hot the skin falls off before the flesh has a chance to cook so what you get is a deskinned, raw pepper.
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  #27  
Old 12-20-2006, 04:01 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese
I got some good ideas when I asked the same thing on eGullet.
Good stuff there, thanks.

French onion soup seems like a great use for it.
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  #28  
Old 12-20-2006, 07:21 PM
Dr. Rieux Dr. Rieux is offline
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I once saw Julia Child on the Letterman show, using a propane hand torch to make a patty melt.
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  #29  
Old 12-20-2006, 09:00 PM
Licentious Ectomorph Licentious Ectomorph is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinyl Turnip
Big Trouble

INGREDIENTS

2 or more bored 10-year-olds
1 blowtorch
1 stray cat
1 can gasoline (optional)

DIRECTIONS

Blend and leave unattended.

Variation: Add Kool-Aid with grain alcohol or fortified wine before blending. Neighbor's dog or backyard shed may be substituted for stray cat.
Is this supposed to be funny? Because I assure you it's not.

I'm sure I'm about to be piled on, but I have to look askance at anyone who finds humor in the idea of setting animals on fire. Ha ha, torturing small animals in the most hideous way imaginable, yeah that's a real knee slapper.
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  #30  
Old 12-20-2006, 09:33 PM
devilsknew devilsknew is offline
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You could conceivably make candy apple ribs. Dip the finished rack o' ribs in cherry juice and then roll in brown turbinado sugar and torch them babies up! Make a hard candy rub.
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  #31  
Old 12-20-2006, 09:49 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Licentious Ectomorph
Is this supposed to be funny? Because I assure you it's not.
Eh, it's not my A-list material. I think the refund counter's still open if you hurry.
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  #32  
Old 12-21-2006, 04:02 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shalmanese
I don't like it for toasting bell peppers though. The torch is so hot the skin falls off before the flesh has a chance to cook so what you get is a deskinned, raw pepper.
I think this just means you're holding it too close to the skin. But I use a plumber's blowtorch to toast peppers - much quicker.
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  #33  
Old 12-21-2006, 09:55 AM
BubbaDog BubbaDog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
Actually, last night I used it to crisp up some chicken skin that was looking a bit "wet."
Stuck in the back of my brain somewhere is this memory of a news report or article where they state that all of that delicious food in magazine pics, on TV commercials and some window displays is not as delicious as it looks.

When the food exists only for the pretty picture the preparers do some weird things like -

shaving cream used as a sub for whip cream
Mashed potatoes made with paste or other unnatural additives

and

A whole raw turkey made to look fully roasted by takinf a blowtorch to the skin and carefullyh "painting" in the browness.
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  #34  
Old 12-21-2006, 09:58 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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...rising steam coming from a tampon dipped in boiling water and hidden behind a food item or behind the back of the plate - the food itself is not steaming hot.
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  #35  
Old 12-21-2006, 10:02 AM
tdn tdn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangetout
...rising steam coming from a tampon dipped in boiling water and hidden behind a food item or behind the back of the plate - the food itself is not steaming hot.
Yeah, well...

Now I have a craving for rose hip tea.
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  #36  
Old 12-21-2006, 10:24 PM
Wile E Wile E is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Rieux
I once saw Julia Child on the Letterman show, using a propane hand torch to make a patty melt.
Ya gotta love the woman.
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  #37  
Old 12-22-2006, 12:08 AM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham
tdn -- We went to two restaurants in the past few months that had creme brulee, which I'd never had before, so we tried it. MilliCal loved it -- except for that hard-crackle sugar crust on the top (that's so hard to make and that some people die for). The second time we tried it, she insisted that someone else eat the crust off.
The crust indeed is the best part, nay, the point of crème brûlée. MilliCal might want to try crème caramel next time. It's a similar idea, although usually a little bit lighter than crème brûlée, and instead of hard candy caramel on top, there's a caramel syrup. So, in other words, flan. Wikipedia says they're the same thing--I've noticed that flan usually has evaporated milk and/or condensed milk, while crème caramel doesn't have either (that I've seen).

Oh, the crust is not hard to make at all. Just sprinkly a layer of fine sugar, and blowtorch it or place it under a broiler. With the broiler, it is a little bit tricky to get it to brown evenly and not burn. With a torch, it's simple.
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  #38  
Old 12-22-2006, 03:41 AM
Angua Angua is offline
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You can use a blowtorch to finish off a Spanish tortilla when you've put far too much into it to turn it over in the pan.

I wonder if one could use it to make pizza...
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  #39  
Old 12-22-2006, 08:45 AM
Carnac the Magnificent! Carnac the Magnificent! is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell
The crust indeed is the best part, nay, the point of crème brûlée. MilliCal might want to try crème caramel next time. It's a similar idea, although usually a little bit lighter than crème brûlée, and instead of hard candy caramel on top, there's a caramel syrup. So, in other words, flan. Wikipedia says they're the same thing--I've noticed that flan usually has evaporated milk and/or condensed milk, while crème caramel doesn't have either (that I've seen).

Oh, the crust is not hard to make at all. Just sprinkly a layer of fine sugar, and blowtorch it or place it under a broiler. With the broiler, it is a little bit tricky to get it to brown evenly and not burn. With a torch, it's simple.

I thought the preferred method entails using turbinado sugar--raw sugar. True, false, donna matter?
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  #40  
Old 12-22-2006, 09:22 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Licentious Ectomorph
Is this supposed to be funny? Because I assure you it's not.

I'm sure I'm about to be piled on, but I have to look askance at anyone who finds humor in the idea of setting animals on fire. Ha ha, torturing small animals in the most hideous way imaginable, yeah that's a real knee slapper.
Agreed.
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  #41  
Old 12-22-2006, 09:23 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
Oh dear -- the "crust" is the best part!
That's certainly what Amelie thought! http://imdb.com/title/tt0211915/
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  #42  
Old 12-22-2006, 09:32 AM
flight flight is offline
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Baked Alaska
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  #43  
Old 12-22-2006, 12:18 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnac the Magnificent!
I thought the preferred method entails using turbinado sugar--raw sugar. True, false, donna matter?
It's possible. The Michelin-starred restaurant I worked at briefly (only as a kitchen porter, mind you), just used castor sugar (aka "superfine" here in the US), and it came out fine. I use regular sugar and it works out just fine.
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  #44  
Old 12-22-2006, 01:58 PM
Vinyl Turnip Vinyl Turnip is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir
Agreed.
Tell you what---to prevent further hijack, I'll be on call in the Pit if any other "Cat Fancy" subscribers want to chime in on the naughtiness of hurting defenseless widdle animals. (Which---though it boggles my mind to think this disclaimer is actually necessary---I was not actually advocating.)

In related news, tellers of knock-knock jokes may not really be endorsing the widespread application of human knuckles to real-world doors.
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  #45  
Old 12-23-2006, 08:23 PM
Caractacus Pott Caractacus Pott is offline
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Mock Nilla Wafers

Yes. Mock Nilla Wafers. Some friends brought me out to a fancy restaurant. Top of a bank building in Atlanta, waiters in red vests, I had to wear socks. Fancy. There were, um, 18 courses. The second or third to the last looked like Nilla Wafers. They tasted like angel food cake. Turn 'em over and they looked like angel food cake.

Not being well-versed in the culinary arts, I told the friend who knows his way around that room with the big hot thing in it that they probably smashed angel food cake then blow-torched it to make it that color. Before leaving for supper, I saw someone using a blow torch to brown merangue points on TV. That blew my mind!

The waiter interrupts our discussion with a bottle wrapped in a black napkin. Presenting it to me, the only non-drinker. Before I could ask why, he unwrapped a blow torch!

So I guess you can make mock Nilla Wafers with a blow torch.


PS: If you've already heard this story, I apologize. It's the only cooking story that I don't end up bleeding or contused by the conclusion, so I trot it out whenver I can.
__________________
You'll find a slight squeeze on the hooter an excellent safety precaution, Miss Scrumptious.
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  #46  
Old 12-23-2006, 08:30 PM
JustAnotherGeek JustAnotherGeek is offline
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Bananas Brulee.
  • Slice a banana lengthwise, then peel.
  • Place cut side down onto a plate of table sugar; press it down for a second or two.
  • Remove and place sugared-side up on a cooling rack over a baking sheet.
  • Caramelize the sugar with your torch.
  • Serve with ice cream.
  • Accept adorations if done for other people.

Enjoy.
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  #47  
Old 01-02-2007, 08:16 PM
LANmom LANmom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdn
In what recipes is a blow torch called for? I just got one as a gift, but my poor arteries can't handle creme brulee on a regular enough basis to justify owning one.

How long does it take to blow torch a frozen turkey to doneness?
Oh thank you for that histerical visual....a blowtorch roasting a turkey too funny!!
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  #48  
Old 01-04-2007, 08:18 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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The creme brule topping doesn't have to go on creme brule. Try it on warm pudding, ice cream, whatever.
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  #49  
Old 03-31-2013, 01:35 AM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
....
Oh, the crust is not hard to make at all. Just sprinkly a layer of fine sugar, and blowtorch it or place it under a broiler. With the broiler, it is a little bit tricky to get it to brown evenly and not burn. With a torch, it's simple.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnac the Magnificent! View Post
I thought the preferred method entails using turbinado sugar--raw sugar. True, false, donna matter?
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
It's possible. The Michelin-starred restaurant I worked at briefly (only as a kitchen porter, mind you), just used castor sugar (aka "superfine" here in the US), and it came out fine. I use regular sugar and it works out just fine.
I raise this zombie--Hey, it's Easter today! Not implying that JC is a zombie...-- because it was the first Google cite on "cooking with a blowtorch" and I'm a Doper, searched now that I am a proud new owner of a Bernzomatic 8000. And this little dialogue caught my eye. In a fancy overcharging tapas joint, the chef sprinkled brown sugar on a portion of an egg (dontcha know) because, she told me, you can get a quick localized melt with the large granules.

Hell, there is such a thing as cake sugar, which have huge flakes. Could give that a whirl. For the man with a hammer everything is a nail.

For the Brit who asked for a translation of broiler (if he's still among us), what is really the issue here, as someone pointed out about a salamander, is the usefulness of an "upper broiler," not a grill, for quick and hard surface application (excluding peppers, say, or steaks at a steak restaurant, when you have some ungodly amount of BTUs to work with for a char without overlooking the food.

My top-broiler is in old-type stove whee I have to get on my knees and pull out a drawer from the bottom, put in the food, and glaze the too sight unseen hoping for the best. It's a non-starter, and I was always annoyed that the "now pop it under the broiler" for a nice glaze or browning."

BTW, an aioli smeared on top of a dish after the major cooking also benefits from a quick blast. <Didn't know where to put this sentence. >

Also, for the blowtorch-less, for a roast bird that needs some color, you can place it in the upper rack to make use of the higher reflected heat. But again, that's for relatively long cooking.
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  #50  
Old 03-31-2013, 04:08 AM
gaffa gaffa is offline
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If you prepare a steak sous vide, you'll want to put a crust on it with a blow torch. The alternative is to use a broiler, and why generate all that excess heat when you can get far more reliable results with the torch.

One tip: Always start the torch pointing away from the food. Otherwise you run the risk of droplets of unburned fuel falling on the food.
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