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  #1  
Old 01-09-2008, 11:02 AM
kayT kayT is offline
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Should we move to South Carolina?

My Dear Husband has decided we can't keep living in California. We are retired (at age 61 and 62; lucky us) and it is expensive here. Also, the quality of life seems to be declining (we live in the LA area). The city seems to lack funds for basics (fix streets, hire cops). Graffitti is getting worse. Our neighborhood is not an upscale one and we certainly can't afford to move to a more upscale one even tho our house appears to be worth triple what we paid for it 14 years ago. I personally love living here and do not want to move anywhere. But now! he's decided the place to go is Aikin South Carolina. An entire continent away. I think this is way way too far. He says, ok you find a place then. So I am consulting the experts.

I did see a thread about where to live from a few months ago (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=440377) but that OP had different criteria. We too want not too expensive, but don't care about mountains, and do care about climate: must not ever be cold! College town would be good. Must have Starbucks; would prefer Barnes & Noble, Whole Foods and Trader Joe's (how in the world am I going to leave LA???). Some percent of liberal thinkers would help. (I lived for 2 very long years in a small town in Georgia and did not enjoy that experience...) Any suggestions? Anyone from Aikin or environs want to pitch in? Of course since I don't really want to move I will be picky, but I am really trying to be open minded about this. All ideas greatly appreciated.
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Old 01-09-2008, 12:10 PM
Sprockets Sprockets is offline
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. . . ' Some percent of liberal thinkers would help. (I lived for 2 very long years in a small town in Georgia and did not enjoy that experience...) "

Then you don't want to move to South Carolina. Let me tell you a story.

I was raised outside Washington, D.C. Lots of culture, etc. My husband is English. We were living outside London for a few years and his company, which has a branch in Charlotte, NC, asked if we wanted to be transferred there. I was tired of the constant rain and chill, the lack of sunlight, the high prices, etc. In short, the charm of Merry Olde had worn off.

In addition to DC, I have lived in Michigan, Ohio, California (born there), and I've visited many places around the world. I'd also been through the south on vacations, and I thought "Sure, why not? People are people, right?"

Wrong. After we had moved into a very nice (and ultra cheap!) huge house on an acre in SC just south of Charlotte, I realized I was in hell. The natives, almost without exception, were hostile and rude. I was calleed a "Yankee" in what was obviously an insulting tone so many times I can't tell you. I got so sick of seeing yahoos driving around with t heir dogs nearly spilling out the backs of pickups. The accent drove me crazy, and I'm someone who's used to accents. The bouffy 80s hairdos, the long fake nails, the complete and utter moronic attitudes. . . .this is the Bible belt. These are republicans who will always be republicans but who don't have a clue what it means to be a republican.

South Carolina is consistently one of the lowest scorers in educational testing, and I believe NC isn't far behind. Since most people don't leave the state they're born in, you see what you end up with. Charlotte has all the stores you mentioned, but the people in them will drive you crazy.

I've travelled all over South Carolina, from Greenville to the coast. Believe me when I tell you if you want intelligent conversation, people who know how to get things done, and good old fashioned politeness, you do not want to move there.

[The above is just my opinion.]

The most horrendous bumper sticker I saw when I was down there (plastered between rebel flag stickers): "Teach a Yankee to drive and point him north."

Southerners are still fighting the civil war, which no one told them they already lost. The south will never "rise again" because it never stood up in the first place.

Oh, and the reason I have this attitude? Southerners gave it to me.
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2008, 12:20 PM
control-z control-z is online now
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SoCal to SC would be culture shock.

All the stores you mentioned should be available in any sizeable city in the US.

Maybe the Flordia Keys? Trouble with Florida is a lot of weird people, thunderstorms, and hurricanes.
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2008, 03:23 PM
scdad scdad is offline
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I live just down the road from Aiken, and it's not a bad place. The cost of living is low, and you can afford probably three times the house you have in SoCal. It's a retirement community, as you know, but is 20 miles or so from Augusta, GA, a decent-sized city. The metropolitan area encompasses several counties within SC & GA, and nearly 500,000 people call the region home. Aiken itself has only around 20,000 or so residents, and it a fairly quiet hamlet. There is not a Barnes & Noble nor Whole Foods in Aiken itself, but both are in Augusta, along with a lot of other decent stores. Crime rate in Aiken is low, and Augusta is not bad for a city of it's size. Aiken is a Polo town, and signs of the equestrian population is everywhere.

Aiken is quickly growing, just opening it's second Wal-Mart last month. There is a Home Depot, Lowe's, and several nice grocery stores. In terms of restaurants, there is a Fatz Cafe, O'Charley's, Ruby Tuesday, Outback, Applebee's, and Red Lobster, along with the usual run of fast food. Across the river in Augusta, there are tons of places from which to choose. Aiken has almost everything you need, and the rest is a short drive down the road.
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Old 01-09-2008, 03:29 PM
scdad scdad is offline
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Oh, and forgot to mention. There is a Starbucks located within Kroger, but not a full size stand-alone store I don't believe. There is one or more in Augusta. It does get a little chilly at times, but rarely gets below 25 or so in the coldest times (although it did hit 14 one day last week, but that's rare.) Annual snowfall is less than a inch, but we get occasional 2-3 inch storms every few years. There was a freak storm in 1972 I think that dumped a foot or so, and that's the record snowfall. It does get hot, however.
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Old 01-09-2008, 04:51 PM
bannerrefugee bannerrefugee is offline
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I am from Myrtle Beach. My part of the state is a bit more liberal than the inland but it is still quite conservative. I have not lived there in 18 years but still visit often. I also have family in Greenville SC. If I had a choice about where to live in SC I would probably pick Charleston.

How on earth did he arrive at Aikin?

Last edited by bannerrefugee; 01-09-2008 at 04:53 PM..
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  #7  
Old 01-09-2008, 05:24 PM
MonaLizaT MonaLizaT is offline
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The most horrendous bumper sticker I saw when I was down there (plastered between rebel flag stickers): "Teach a Yankee to drive and point him north."
We're glad you took the suggestion. The bumper sticker is actually "Save the south, teach a Yankee to drive."

Beaufort, SC is very charming and literate. They have a thriving film industry (The Great Santini, Prince of Tides & Forrest Gump were all filmed there) and Pat Conroy was my friend's english teacher. A very cool historic district and waterfront area. It is a bit small though, so I doubt it would have a Whole Foods.

Also, there are several military bases so you'd better like "the sound of freedom."

Last edited by MonaLizaT; 01-09-2008 at 05:25 PM..
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Old 01-09-2008, 05:35 PM
kayT kayT is offline
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Thanks for the answers so far. scdad, what's it like in the summer? Someone in that other thread indicated it was pretty nasty in August (as in humid & hot).

bannerrefugee, he said he found it on some lists of best places for retirees to live, I think.

MonaLizaT, I have no big objection to the "sound of freedom." However, I am a Yankee; will the natives be trying to run me out of town?

Last edited by kayT; 01-09-2008 at 05:35 PM..
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Old 01-09-2008, 05:47 PM
MonaLizaT MonaLizaT is offline
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Originally Posted by MonaLizaT
I have no big objection to the "sound of freedom." However, I am a Yankee; will the natives be trying to run me out of town?
While I agree that parts of SC and NC can be backward ("God's country," they call it), I think that Sprockets post does a disservice to the majority of southerners. I think that most are far more gracious than other parts of the country.

I was a consultant to the DoD for a number of years and Beaufort and Charleston were favorites. MCRD Parris Island is located in Beaufort (boot camp for Marines) and it is near Hilton Head (same county) which has a large retirement/vacation population. (Don't believe the Sun City Hilton Head name - it's really Bluffton.) But alas, yes, Beaufort does suffer from hot and humid summers. Its climate is similar to ours in Jacksonville, FL. Give the Shrimp Festival a try this July, though. It is a very water-oriented community.

Last edited by MonaLizaT; 01-09-2008 at 05:49 PM..
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  #10  
Old 01-09-2008, 06:12 PM
The Hamster King The Hamster King is offline
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Originally Posted by kayT
Must not ever be cold!
How do you feel about humidity? South Carolina is considerably steamier than SoCal. My wife and I lived in North Carolina before we moved to L.A.. We had a BIG back yard that backed up to some woods and we almost never spent any time in it because it was so freaking humid and buggy.

If you've already lived in a small town in Georgia and didn't like it you might think twice about moving to South Carolina. Some people really like the small town southern vibe but my wife and I couldn't get out of North Carolina fast enough. We never really made any close friends, probably because we were liberal atheists who weren't interested in basketball or lawncare. I'm not trying to be snotty or elitist here. Our neighbors were nice people and clearly very happy. We tried to make friends with them and they tried to make friends with us, but the overtures never went anywhere beyond a friendly nod at the mailbox. We just didn't have much in common with each other.

As you can imagine, we feel right at home in L.A..

If L.A. is too expensive you might consider looking for a cheaper place to live that's still out west. The climate will be better and the culture shock won't be so great.
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:23 PM
kayT kayT is offline
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Oh believe me I have thought twice; I don't want to move to SC. HE (DH) wants to. I love LA. (I too am a liberal atheist, altho I do like basketball and gardening--lawn care, not so much.)
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:36 PM
MonaLizaT MonaLizaT is offline
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Aiken has a fairly large equestrian population, if you are into that.

Why not Asheville, NC? Oh yeah, it gets cold. But it is lovely and more liberal than much of the south.
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Old 01-09-2008, 07:01 PM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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I'll weigh in. As my name suggests I'm a transplanted northerner. I live just south of Charlotte, in NC, but 5 minutes from the border of SC.

Compared to the weather in NY/NJ, this is a dream. I've been here 3 winters now and I've seen snow twice. Both times it was just a dusting that was pretty to see but melted on its own within hours. It was 70 here yesterday. It does get down into the 30s on occasion however, but not often and not for long.

Charlotte it growing fast and has most of the amenities I need (including Trader Joes!) I live 20 minutes from the city but I'm surrounded by horse farms. I have 3 acres of land and a 3000 Sq. Ft. house and my property taxes are $2200 year. In NJ, I had .25 of an acre and my taxes were $11000.

Aiken is obviously smaller, and I haven't been there, but overall, we love living in the South. Sure there are some adjustments, but mostly they are charming and quirky, as opposed to true obstacles.
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Old 01-09-2008, 08:34 PM
bannerrefugee bannerrefugee is offline
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Originally Posted by kayT
Thanks for the answers so far. scdad, what's it like in the summer? Someone in that other thread indicated it was pretty nasty in August (as in humid & hot).
Itís hot and often very humid. In my part there are swarms of mosquitos if itís not winter, I'm sure Aiken is not much different.

Go visit the area, also visit NC. I am familiar with the Winston Salem, Salisbury and also the outer banks of that state. All strike me as nice.

NC seems somewhat better educated, more affluent and more urban then SC. The weather is a little colder but still quite nice.
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:22 PM
BoBettie BoBettie is offline
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Originally Posted by Sprockets
. . . ' Some percent of liberal thinkers would help. (I lived for 2 very long years in a small town in Georgia and did not enjoy that experience...) "

Then you don't want to move to South Carolina. Let me tell you a story.
I couldn't have said it better myself. I had the same experiences in NC. I was never so happy to see a state in my rear view mirror.
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:26 PM
BoBettie BoBettie is offline
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Originally Posted by MonaLizaT
While I agree that parts of SC and NC can be backward ("God's country," they call it), I think that Sprockets post does a disservice to the majority of southerners. I think that most are far more gracious than other parts of the country.
To be fair, I can tell you I had identical experiences there. Yankee go home, blah blah blah. Was it everyone? Of course not. Was it a LOT of people? Yes, yes it was. That's not even opinion, it's actual fact. When I lived there it was clear that I was not welcome as a "Yankee" and a NY liberal. Gracious? There were certainly some very gracious people, but the overall attitude I personally received was "We don't want you here. LEAVE". I gladly did so and have never looked back. Living there was a terrible, hateful experience. I wouldn't move back if someone gave me a house for free.

*cue southerners shouting "GOOD!! WE'RE GLAD!!"
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:43 PM
control-z control-z is online now
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A lot of the reason for hostility towards Yankees is they come down South to get away from the hustle and bustle of the North, then start complaining that there's nothing to do down here. Then they start wanting malls and Starbucks and shit. I like fields and trees personally.

Anyway, your average Southern person isn't going to be hostile towards you unless you make an ass of yourself or act like you're better than them.

I'll third North Carolina, I swear every time I talk to a customer from NC they are very polite and friendly people.
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Old 01-09-2008, 09:55 PM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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I say go for it, if it will keep 2 more Californians out of Nevada! You all have nearly wrecked the joint already.
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Old 01-09-2008, 10:33 PM
Alice The Goon Alice The Goon is offline
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I, too, lived in South Carolina just minutes from Charlotte, NC (Rock Hill, SC), and that whole Piedmont area is very different from what you're used to in California. Plus it's hot and very humid. I've also lived in Asheville, NC, and I second that it's a great town- I loved it.

You'll probably end up moving here- all you old farts do, eventually. Sigh.

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Old 01-09-2008, 11:03 PM
Hey, It's That Guy! Hey, It's That Guy! is offline
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OP, you and your husband should try the questionnaire on http://www.findyourspot.com . You feed in all your criteria about what you want in a new city or town, and it will give you several options, geared toward the things that are most important to you.
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Old 01-09-2008, 11:12 PM
Bearflag70 Bearflag70 is offline
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My first thought was Austin, TX, but I don't know anything about living there other than it's "urban" and a warm, fun, interesting, liberal, college town.
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Old 01-10-2008, 12:31 AM
cherry cherry is offline
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My inlaws moved from California to "Suncity" in South Carlolina. It is near the NC/SC border in Fort Lee. I've never heard of suncity before but it's an active adult community and it's pretty cool from what I've seen. They've got swimming pools, golf and alot of other club activities. The homes are pretty large for what you get considering LA home prices.
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Old 01-10-2008, 06:02 AM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by cherry

My inlaws moved from California to "Suncity" in South Carlolina. It is near the NC/SC border in Fort Lee. I've never heard of suncity before but it's an active adult community and it's pretty cool from what I've seen. They've got swimming pools, golf and alot of other club activities. The homes are pretty large for what you get considering LA home prices.
cherry, that town is actually Fort Mill. No George Washington Bridge in sight..
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Old 01-10-2008, 06:05 AM
Sprockets Sprockets is offline
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Originally Posted by BoBettie
I couldn't have said it better myself. I had the same experiences in NC. I was never so happy to see a state in my rear view mirror.
Thank you for saying that, Bettie, although of course I'm sorry you had the same experience. As I said we've lived in a lot of different places but I've never encountered such rudeness and small mindedness as I did in SC. It came as a complete shock to us. There was just no valid reason for it.

I posted my own experiences, and you can see the nastiness of the responses from the southerners.
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Old 01-10-2008, 07:45 AM
scdad scdad is offline
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Originally Posted by kayT
Thanks for the answers so far. scdad, what's it like in the summer? Someone in that other thread indicated it was pretty nasty in August (as in humid & hot).
It gets hot and humid. We have "wet heat" as opposed to the "dry heat" that's supposedly out west. In the summer, it's in the low to mid 90's most days, with a heat index around 100 or so. We get even hotter. This past summer, we had a period of 12 straight days with the auctual temp over 100, with it reaching 108 I believe one day, but year before that it only reached 100 once, so it varies a bit. You get used to it. It must not bother most people, because a majority of the transplants are retirees from the Northeast.
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Old 01-10-2008, 07:57 AM
scdad scdad is offline
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Originally Posted by kayT
I have no big objection to the "sound of freedom." However, I am a Yankee; will the natives be trying to run me out of town?
Again, it must not be too bad. There have been increasing numbers of Northerners moving in year after year. I have lived in this area for all but two of my 31 years, and I don't see the negativity most people seem to think all Southerners have. I don't have stats, but in the city of Aiken, there are probably less natives than transplants now. Also, I second the low property taxes. I read a story in the paper yesterday that taxes on a $250,000 home only run a little over $2,000 per annum. There have been stories in the paper about how this area's homes are actually undervalued, and that the recent housing market crunch has had little to no effect at all on the market here. The homes run the gamut from small cottages to mansions in the gated communities to $3 million horse farms.
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Old 01-10-2008, 08:24 AM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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Originally Posted by Sprockets
. the people in them will drive you crazy.

Perhaps this is why you were rudely called a Yankee ... and not the other way 'round. Southerners are kind and welcoming to people who deserve it.
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Old 01-10-2008, 08:54 AM
scdad scdad is offline
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Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry
Southerners are kind and welcoming to people who deserve it.
Also to note, a couple of the "rude" comments about SC have been about the northern section around Charlotte, which is quite a bit faster-paced and more culturally-deversed than Aiken. Charlotte is a fairly big city, the largest city in the Southeast located inbetween Atlanta and D.C. In my own experience, there is a noticible difference between Aiken and Charlotte. Keep in mind, the OP was asking about Aiken for the most part, which is a small town, located within a medium-sized metro area. It is not a fast-paced big city. Most people here are kind. They let you out in traffic (which is minimal, by the way,) and say "please" and "thank you." The most northern city I have been to is Norfolk, and trust me, I can tell a HUGE difference in the attitudes. You can't tell me SC has the rudest people you have encountered.
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Old 01-10-2008, 09:18 AM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kayT
I did see a thread about where to live from a few months ago (http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=440377) but that OP had different criteria. We too want not too expensive, but don't care about mountains, and do care about climate: must not ever be cold! College town would be good. Must have Starbucks; would prefer Barnes & Noble, Whole Foods and Trader Joe's (how in the world am I going to leave LA???). Some percent of liberal thinkers would help. (I lived for 2 very long years in a small town in Georgia and did not enjoy that experience...) Any suggestions? Anyone from Aikin or environs want to pitch in? Of course since I don't really want to move I will be picky, but I am really trying to be open minded about this. All ideas greatly appreciated.
I don't know about Aiken, but you may want to consider the Rock Hill/Fort Mill area if you're set on South Carolina. You'd be right outside of Charlotte.

Starbucks - Check (It'd be harder to find a place without a Starbucks.) Just over the State Line on US 521, there's a Dilworth's Coffee, which is even better, IMO.

B&N - There's one at the Carolina Place Mall, which is right up the road. There are also plenty of Borders, too.

Whole Foods - Not yet, but there's an Earth Fare up 521.

Trader Joe's - Again - just up 521 and over a couple of miles.

Downsides - I don't think there would be too many Liberal ThinkersTM, but the area is growing more moderate as more transplants arrive. You would also have to be used to driving. Charlotte did just get a light rail train, but most of what you'd want is only available by driving.
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Old 01-10-2008, 09:49 AM
BetsQ BetsQ is offline
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I second Bearflag's suggestion to look into Austin if you're looking for something warm, liberal, and less expensive than LA.
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Old 01-10-2008, 10:18 AM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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<hijack>Hey Maus, any interest in a Charlotte-area Dope Fest?</hijack>
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Old 01-10-2008, 10:52 AM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is offline
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Originally Posted by Southern Yankee
<hijack>Hey Maus, any interest in a Charlotte-area Dope Fest?</hijack>
<continuing hijack>Sure - I couldn't make the Raleigh one a few months back.</continuing hijack>

<totally different hijack>I didn't realize you were in Charlotte - Heck from you description upthread, you sound like you're right in my neck of the woods. For some reason, I thought you were in the Atlanta area.</totally different hijack>
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Old 01-10-2008, 11:07 AM
Maus Magill Maus Magill is offline
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Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry
Perhaps this is why you were rudely called a Yankee ... and not the other way 'round. Southerners are kind and welcoming to people who deserve it.
Speaking as an actual native southerner in Charlotte (a very rare breed), I am very welcoming of transplants. Heck, I married one. However, I do get pissed off when people move down here, and then complain about how it's different than up north. Of course it's different. It's a different part of the country. Sheesh.

That and the occasional remark about "ignorant southerners" really get my goat.
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Old 01-10-2008, 11:20 AM
bannerrefugee bannerrefugee is offline
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Originally Posted by Sprockets

I posted my own experiences, and you can see the nastiness of the responses from the southerners.
I'm a southerner, and I haven't said anything nasy.
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Old 01-10-2008, 11:21 AM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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Quote:
Originally posted by Maus Magill

<continuing hijack>Sure - I couldn't make the Raleigh one a few months back.</continuing hijack>

<totally different hijack>I didn't realize you were in Charlotte - Heck from you description upthread, you sound like you're right in my neck of the woods. For some reason, I thought you were in the Atlanta area.</totally different hijack>
Cool. I'll start a new thread to see who's up for it. How does the weekend of February 2 look for you? I'm in Union County, by the way.
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Old 01-10-2008, 12:49 PM
BoBettie BoBettie is offline
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Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry
Perhaps this is why you were rudely called a Yankee ... and not the other way 'round. Southerners are kind and welcoming to people who deserve it.
Um, some are for sure, but to deny that prejudice against northerners for no reason other than "you're a Yankee and we don't like yer kind!" doesn't exist is ridiculous.

I walked into my job in NC (I was transferred and this was a major hospital) and was literally putting down my purse when the new boss walked up. I shook her hand and said hello. She eyed me suspiciously and said "So. You're from NY, huh?" and I said yes (and emphasized not NYC, rural NY). She sneered at me and said "So, I guess you think you're better than us huh? Smarter?"

I got that attitude from probably 80% of the people I met and dealt with. I am a nice person, a hard worker and not a nasty "OMG I miss New Yawk!" person. I never sat around pining for NY or talked about the north to southerners. I was still treated like shit by the vast majority of the people I personally came across.

Bear in mind, I was in a rural area of NC and worked in Charlotte. A lot of people in Charlotte itself were fine to me, the shopping is great and the weather was decent. It was just made very clear to me that I was not wanted or welcome there. I assure you that I did not bring it on myself.

Last edited by BoBettie; 01-10-2008 at 12:50 PM..
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Old 01-10-2008, 01:18 PM
bannerrefugee bannerrefugee is offline
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Originally Posted by BoBettie

Bear in mind, I was in a rural area of NC and worked in Charlotte. A lot of people in Charlotte itself were fine to me, the shopping is great and the weather was decent. It was just made very clear to me that I was not wanted or welcome there. I assure you that I did not bring it on myself.
I recently relocated from Atlanta to the rural Midwest. I get sort of the same treatment you describe. The South may or may not be more prejudicial to newcomers but it does not have a monopoly.
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Old 01-10-2008, 01:41 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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Originally Posted by kayT
Some percent of liberal thinkers would help.
Naw, you're not going to like it. Not many liberals. Now we got Democrats. Oh, boy, we got Democrats. We got 'em in. . . numbers.
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  #39  
Old 01-10-2008, 01:44 PM
Ellen Cherry Ellen Cherry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBettie

I walked into my job in NC (I was transferred and this was a major hospital) and was literally putting down my purse when the new boss walked up. I shook her hand and said hello. She eyed me suspiciously and said "So. You're from NY, huh?" and I said yes (and emphasized not NYC, rural NY). She sneered at me and said "So, I guess you think you're better than us huh? Smarter?"
Well that does sound bad. But there is a cultural difference that sometimes people from the North don't see. Southerners sometimes view people from elsewhere as rude and stuck-up because they fail to fall all over themselves being nice to you. You keep to yourself in the South, you're likely to be thought of as a snob.

Here's turning the tables -- I talk to people where ever I go, and they talk back. Grocery stores, departent stores, banks, whatever. Chit-chat with perfect strangers about whatever's going on or whatever's on my mind.

Now this kind of behavior has been greeted in the North with horrible haughty looks, suspicion and "are YOU talking to ME??" behavior that *I* found very rude. I don't feel like I'm pesty or bothering people; hell, others frequently start up conversations with me and I think nothing of it.

So, while some of you have experienced some outright rude behavior when you move South, I'm merely suggesting that your unconscious behavior might be contributing.

Also, possessing the attitude that you're living among horrible people shows, whether you know it or not.
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  #40  
Old 01-10-2008, 01:45 PM
Bearflag70 Bearflag70 is offline
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Is there a similar Southern prejudice and attitude against Westerners and, in particluar, Californians?
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  #41  
Old 01-10-2008, 02:20 PM
ivylass ivylass is offline
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I would recommend spending an extended period of time, say one to three months, in the area you'd like to move to before you actually move. Ideally, you'll do it at least twice...once in winter and once in summer, just to make sure you're okay with the seasons.

You don't want to uproot and move to a strange place and find out you loathe it. I don't know what your finances are, but I would strongly recommend a long vacation (or a working vacation) before you move.
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  #42  
Old 01-10-2008, 02:28 PM
control-z control-z is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearflag70
Is there a similar Southern prejudice and attitude against Westerners and, in particluar, Californians?
Doesn't everyone have a prejudice against Californians?

I haven't seen any particular prejudice against Westerners in general.
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  #43  
Old 01-10-2008, 02:29 PM
Lamar Mundane Lamar Mundane is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearflag70
Is there a similar Southern prejudice and attitude against Westerners and, in particluar, Californians?
I've lived in Colorado for 20 years and before that I was in Virginia. I get called a Yankee all the time when I am in the South. I've never lived in a Union state in my life.

It seems that to the average Southerner, "not Southern" = Yankee.
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  #44  
Old 01-10-2008, 02:31 PM
control-z control-z is online now
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Interestingly enough, a friend of mine was telling me about a Wall Street Journal article he recently read about a company that moved from SoCal to SC. The 2 bosses got on a jet with the company server on a paid seat between them and flew to SC. They cited lower taxes, lower health insurance and benefit costs, and better workforce.

KayT, wonder if your husband read the same article?
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  #45  
Old 01-10-2008, 03:06 PM
Labrador Deceiver Labrador Deceiver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MonaLizaT
I think that Sprockets post does a disservice to the majority of southerners. I think that most are far more gracious than other parts of the country.
No, sprocket's post does a disservice to polite people who have relocated to the South. I live in Atlanta, which has probably as many non-southerners as it does native southerners. If life here was as terrible as Bettie & sprocket would have you believe, that probably wouldn't be the case.

In my experience, the "yankees" who complain the loudest about poor treatment absolutely beg to be treated that way. What makes you think I want to hear about how terrible you find the South, or what a utopia you left in the Northeast?? The fact that sprocket thought it would appropriate to tar all southerners with the same brush, then get upset when some folks took exception to it... well, that probably tells you all you need to know.
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  #46  
Old 01-10-2008, 03:32 PM
What Exit? What Exit? is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellen Cherry
Here's turning the tables -- I talk to people where ever I go, and they talk back. Grocery stores, departent stores, banks, whatever. Chit-chat with perfect strangers about whatever's going on or whatever's on my mind.

Now this kind of behavior has been greeted in the North with horrible haughty looks, suspicion and "are YOU talking to ME??" behavior that *I* found very rude. I don't feel like I'm pesty or bothering people; hell, others frequently start up conversations with me and I think nothing of it.
You know, this is pretty weak, I have rarely met a group more willing to strike up a conversation about anything the residents of NYC. The difference is not a willingness to talk, but that New Yorkers talk quicker, keep doing other things while talking and generally bustle around more. The south in general is a lot more laid back and New Yorkers and many near New York are more prone to multitasking in everyday life.

I have struck up conversations much more easily in NYC than anywhere except Glasgow. For some reason Glasgowians(??) are extremely effusive. I recall New Orleans, Chicago & San Francisco to be close to New York in striking up conversations. I did not experience this much in Florida, Virginia or West Virginia. I can't speak to the Carolinas. San Diego and LA were not places of easy conversation, I have no idea why.

Sorry, I have been following this thread and I found the debate that sprung up interesting, but I am surprise by the mischaracterization of New Yorkers and by the reception that some poster are talking about getting in the south.

Anyway, I know several people that relocated to North Carolina and like everything but the summers.

Jim
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  #47  
Old 01-10-2008, 04:43 PM
Southern Yankee Southern Yankee is offline
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Even the summers aren't that bad. I've never been hotter than waiting on the subway platform in work clothes in the middle of August in NYC.

I've seen the good and bad of people in NC/SC and in NY/NJ. As with most things, it's individuals that are usually the problem, not groups.
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  #48  
Old 01-10-2008, 05:21 PM
What Exit? What Exit? is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern Yankee
Even the summers aren't that bad. I've never been hotter than waiting on the subway platform in work clothes in the middle of August in NYC.

I've seen the good and bad of people in NC/SC and in NY/NJ. As with most things, it's individuals that are usually the problem, not groups.
Well said.
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  #49  
Old 01-10-2008, 05:37 PM
Ignatz Ignatz is offline
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Look into area around Wilmington, NC, pop. 100,000 or adjacent Brunswick County on the s.e. corner of the state, abutting SC. There is a Starbuck's IN the B&N and another one a few doors down. It's been in the upper 70's there for the last 3 weeks but is lacking 2 feet of rain for last year. You'll be used to the terrible traffic, too. No Trader Joe's, yet.
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  #50  
Old 01-10-2008, 09:45 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Aiken is gorgeous and awesome. It will not have a Whole Foods or a Trader Joe's, sorry. Even Columbia doesn't have those. (Whole Foods in Charleston and Greenville, I think.) However, Aiken is an incredible place, I believe it's one of those "most liveable cities". And don't listen to the people who'd have you think the South is full of mouth breathing racist gay-beatin' assholes, either. I'd seriously consider moving to Aiken if I didn't have so many things tying me to Columbia.
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