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Old 04-11-2008, 09:49 PM
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Honors mathematics student has only 10% of normal brain volume. How can this be true?


Per the linked article this claim is made. How in the world is this possible? Seems like borderline BS.

Is the Brain Really Necessary?

Quote:
Later, a colleague at Sheffield University became aware of a young man with a larger than normal head. He was referred to Lorber even though it had not caused him any difficulty. Although the boy had an IQ of 126 and had a first class honours degree in mathematics, he had "virtually no brain". A noninvasive measurement of radio density known as CAT scan showed the boy's skull was lined with a thin layer of brain cells to a millimeter in thickness. The rest of his skull was filled with cerebrospinal fluid. The young man continues a normal life with the exception of his knowledge that he has no brain.
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by astro
Per the linked article this claim is made. How in the world is this possible? Seems like borderline BS.

Is the Brain Really Necessary?
I've read about something like this before. The brain mass is normal, but compressed into a very small volume, lining the inside of the skull.

Maybe a variation on something called Hydrocephalus or something like that? I don't remember.

-FrL-
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astro
Per the linked article this claim is made. How in the world is this possible? Seems like borderline BS.

Is the Brain Really Necessary?
I've heard of reported cases like this;

I always 50% think - this is BS
49% think - man, the brain is far more plastic than anyone thinks
1% think - wow, this is proof. Consciousness and the mind are separate from the physical body
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:55 PM
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Yeah, that was it. The Wikipedia article on Hydrocephalus talks about another "exceptional case."

It looks like I was wrong about the brain mass--it really is much smaller than a normal brain, yet some victims with this version of the condition still function apparently quite normally!

Wierd.

-FrL-
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Old 04-11-2008, 09:55 PM
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Yeah, that was it. The Wikipedia article on Hydrocephalus talks about another "exceptional case."

It looks like I was wrong about the brain mass--it really is much smaller than a normal brain, yet some victims with this version of the condition still function apparently quite normally!

Weird.

-FrL-

Last edited by Frylock; 04-11-2008 at 09:58 PM.
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Old 04-12-2008, 01:04 AM
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I know the guy who's profiled in this article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/12/science/12prof.html

He's hydrocephalic and a brilliant mathematician.
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Old 04-12-2008, 09:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frylock
Yeah, that was it. The Wikipedia article on Hydrocephalus talks about another "exceptional case."

It looks like I was wrong about the brain mass--it really is much smaller than a normal brain, yet some victims with this version of the condition still function apparently quite normally!

Weird.

-FrL-
I read the Wikipedia article and the three news stories linked at the bottom of the page, and I can't find any clear statement that the brain mass was abnormal. The articles refer to him as having a "tiny brain", but that's the journalist's choice of words. I think what we have here is probably a brain with about the same number of cells as a normal brain, but with a very odd shape.

I've also heard of cases in which people have had slow-growing brain tumors that reached a huge size--like the size of a baseball--before causing any symptoms. It's apparent that the brain has surprising plasticity, but it would be ridiculous to infer that it is "not necessary". People who have had portions of their brains destroyed tend to miss them.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:00 AM
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WF Tomba writes:

> I think what we have here is probably a brain with about the same number of
> cells as a normal brain, but with a very odd shape.

It appears though that the brain of the boy mentioned in the article linked to in the OP really does have a small brain mass (and thus less brain cells). The neurologist who examined him says that his brain has a mass of 50 to 150 grams. In contrast, the average brain is 1.5 kilograms (1500 grams). Thus the boy has no more than 10% of the mass of the average brain. This happens in about half of hydrocephic cases. That is, half the time a hydrocephic case with no more than 5% of the average brain mass is profoundly retarded. The other half the time people with about 5% of the average brain mass are somewhere close to average intelligence (and some are in fact extremely intelligent).
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:01 AM
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I can't help but wonder what this means for koalas.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by astro
Seems like borderline BS.
Seems like BS to me too. By analogy, I think most people would agree that a person with a heart or with leg muscles 10% of normal size won't be running marathons.

I think people get sentimental about brains, because intelligence has become so important in modern society. A lot of people really don't like the idea that physical limitations can prevent people from accomplishing things.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner
In contrast, the average brain is 1.5 kilograms (1500 grams). Thus the boy has no more than 10% of the mass of the average brain.
But what %age of a normal brain's mass is good old fat?

If the guy has a lean brain but a close to normal # of thinkin' cells he becomes less remarkable. And isn't it also the case that of the thinkin' cells we do have, we don't use anything like the majority of them? So if he's got close to the normal number of thinkers, and maybe uses a higher than average %age of them, well, deformed but not remarkable.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inigo Montoya
But what %age of a normal brain's mass is good old fat?
Little to none, as far as I can tell from reading reputable academic websites. Also, the idea that we don't use most of our brains is a well-known urban legend.
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Old 04-12-2008, 12:10 PM
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From the OP link:
Quote:
One possible explanation for such achievements as this is the neopallium, which forms the very outermost layer of the brain. Since the brains are larger with hydrocephalus sufferers, they have larger neopalliums while the brain mass is diminished in bulk. The neopallium is the site for some of the most important mental functions, such as the power of reasoning.
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Old 04-12-2008, 12:17 PM
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Well, since we only use 10% of our brains, that's obviously the 10% he has. Makes perfect sense to me.



I keed.
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Old 04-12-2008, 08:25 PM
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I hope it has merit...my son has an arachnoid cyst (similar to hydrocephalus) which pushes on the brain from the outside instead of in, although they may result from strokes according to his doctor. But, as large as his is (maybe 10% of his cranial cavity but hard to put a number on it even from an MRI), he is 100% normal at 22 months. He can run and play, count to 10, knows hundreds of words, is learning the alphabet, and amazes me everyday. So I hope the brain is able to compensate for at least some loss. At least it appears to have some ability to do so thus far.
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Old 04-12-2008, 08:32 PM
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Having studied the neurosciences pretty heavily back in the day, and having had a couple of decades now of clinical practice heavy with managing patients with neurologic diseases, I can declaim with little fear of substantiated contradiction that in the field of the study of the brain, there's a lot that goes on that we don't know about.

And as I learn more and more about the brain and its functioning, the more it is apparent to me that we barely know anything about it at all.
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Old 04-12-2008, 10:52 PM
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In the novel The Exorcist, published in 1971, Chris MacNeil takes her daughter Regan to the Mayo clinic to try to determine what's wrong with her. In talking to one of the doctors, he (the doctor) mentions about how he knows of one kid, a brilliant mathematician, who came to him complaining of recurring migraines. When they studied his brain using a CAT scan they found out that he didn't really have one - akin to the OP, the kid described in the novel had a brain stem and a lot of fluid, but no brain.

So when I read the link posted by the OP, I wonder if the doctor and Blatty were writing about the same kid?

Other than that.... I got nothin'.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:07 PM
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The likely source of disingenuousness in the reporting is that they pick a case where a person has exceptional intelligence in a narrowly defined area, combined with a lack of brain matter in general, and say "hah! this person doesn't even have a brain and he's smarter than you!" The thing to realize is that there are almost always tradeoffs, and I strongly wonder what we are not being told. I would be very interested, not in the CAT scans, but in the results of thorough IQ and neuropsychological exams. What functional mechanisms are severely lacking or missing altogether?
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:16 PM
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The (fictional) doctor in the novel _The Exorcist_ probably wasn't speaking about the same case as the one mentioned in the article that's linked to in the OP. If you'll read the article carefully, it says that after John Lorber's talk in 1980, someone at Sheffield University became aware of a young hydrocephalic man who was a mathematician. So it appears that the man mentioned by the colleague at Sheffield couldn't have been the same one as the one mentioned by the doctor in _The Exorcist_, which would have been about ten years earlier. In any case, there have appear to be several cases of hydrocephalic men who were brilliant mathematicians, since the one I know (Nick Patterson) apparently wasn't the same as either of the two previously mentioned ones.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:19 PM
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I don't know, but Nick Patterson, as I've mentioned, is hydrocephalic and a brilliant mathematician. I presume that his brain also has little mass, but I don't know if anyone has checked. I've seen no sign in him of any mental deficiency.
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Old 04-12-2008, 11:55 PM
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So, apparently, mathematicians don't make good zombi food. This is important to know.
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Old 04-13-2008, 10:15 AM
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Barry Beyerstein's remarkable "Whence Cometh the Myth that We Only Use 10% of Our Brains?" among other things touches on Lorber's research, particularly some of the more sensationalized presentations of it.

In PDF form (see p. 14 and beyond),

http://www.sfu.ca/~beyerste/research...t-of-Brain.pdf

Roger Lewin's report on Lorber's research, "Is Your Brain Really Necessary?" (Science 210: 1232-1234, 1980; mentioned in the link in the OP) also provides a helpful analysis of Lorber's claims. Lewin mentions a paper Lorber delivered to "a conference of pediatricians" on whether, Lorber offered rather tongue-in-cheek, the brain was really necessary. I haven't been able to find a reprint of this presented paper, except that it might have been published later in Nursing Mirror (152: 29-30, 1981), a presumably somewhat-less-than-top-tier publication likely not read by even your average neurologist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnT
In the novel The Exorcist, published in 1971, Chris MacNeil takes her daughter Regan to the Mayo clinic to try to determine what's wrong with her. In talking to one of the doctors, he (the doctor) mentions about how he knows of one kid, a brilliant mathematician, who came to him complaining of recurring migraines. When they studied his brain using a CAT scan they found out that he didn't really have one - akin to the OP, the kid described in the novel had a brain stem and a lot of fluid, but no brain.
I can't speak to this anecdote's appearance in The Exorcist, but something quite similar appears in Stephen King's Thinner, published in 1984. One character tells another,

Quote:
A male student at George Washington University came in to see [a neurosurgeon-friend] because he was having blinding headaches. [...] They found out that the kid, who had stood third in his high-school class and who had been on the dean's list every semester at George Washington University, had almost no brain at all. There was a single twist of cortical tissue running up through the center of the skull -- on the X rays my colleague showed me, it looked for all the world like a macrame drape-pull -- and that was all. That drape-pull was probably running all of his involuntary functions, everything from breathing and heart rate to orgasm. Just that one rope of brain tissue. The rest of the kid's head was filled with nothing but cerebrospinal fluid. In some ways we don't understand, the fluid was doing his thinking.

[pp. 57-58 of the 1985 Signet edition]
I suspect tellings such as this appearing in popular works of fiction have done much to reinforce the misconception that we truly only use 10% of our brains.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner
It appears though that the brain of the boy mentioned in the article linked to in the OP really does have a small brain mass (and thus less brain cells). The neurologist who examined him says that his brain has a mass of 50 to 150 grams. In contrast, the average brain is 1.5 kilograms (1500 grams). Thus the boy has no more than 10% of the mass of the average brain.
As others have pointed out, this patient may have (or may have had) 10% of the mass of the average-sized brain, but what's the evidence that this particular small brain contains (or contained) fewer brain cells than its normal counterpart?

-- Tammi Terrell

Last edited by Tammi Terrell; 04-13-2008 at 10:19 AM.
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Old 04-13-2008, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tammi Terrell
As others have pointed out, this patient may have (or may have had) 10% of the mass of the average-sized brain, but what's the evidence that this particular small brain contains (or contained) fewer brain cells than its normal counterpart?

-- Tammi Terrell
Are you suggesting that the brain cells themselves have on average 10% of the mass of normal brain cells?

-FrL-

Last edited by Frylock; 04-13-2008 at 10:27 AM.
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Old 04-13-2008, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Qadgop the Mercotan
And as I learn more and more about the brain and its functioning, the more it is apparent to me that we barely know anything about it at all.
What percent of your brain did you use to deduce that?
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Old 04-13-2008, 10:35 AM
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Does the average size of brain cells (or any cells) in different persons vary much at all? Are you claiming that the average size of brain cells in one person could be one-tenth of the average size of the brain cells in other persons? My impression has always been that the average size of cells in one individual of any one species is very close to the average size of cells in any other individual of that species, as long as one is comparing the same type of cell. Does anyone know more about this?
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Old 04-13-2008, 10:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner
I don't know, but Nick Patterson, as I've mentioned, is hydrocephalic and a brilliant mathematician. I presume that his brain also has little mass, but I don't know if anyone has checked. I've seen no sign in him of any mental deficiency.

I didn't see in this article where he was hydrocephalic or what his brain size is. Did you have other evidence that supports this?
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Old 04-13-2008, 11:03 AM
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As I said, I knew him, and many people in describing him called him hydrocephalic. I admit that I haven't seen him for years. I never talked to him about his condition. Are there other conditions that cause the skull to bulge out like that?
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Old 04-13-2008, 11:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frylock
Are you suggesting that the brain cells themselves have on average 10% of the mass of normal brain cells?
No. But there's considerable seeming "dead space" (which isn't dead space at all, since -- for example -- all sorts of chemical mediators are released and degraded there) surrounding brain cells and in myelinated tracts that is malleable to compression over a considerable length of time and under the right conditions. (See, for example, the Nissl-stained section of primate primary visual cortex on the left of this image.)

I suspect that post-mortem evaluation of histological sections of compressed cortical areas in such rare, functional hydrocephalic patients show a very comparable number of cortical neurons to those of individuals with normal cortical appearance, though in much compressed layers of the cortex. (In other words, I think it likely that the ratio of neuronal number to neuropil volume is much higher in these rare individuals.) One would think it's maintaining a normal neuronal number, numbers of synaptic contacts, and efficacy of synaptic transmission that's crucial here for normal function.

In the end, we don't seem to know whether the individal Lorber described has/had a normal number or cortical neurons or whether he only has/had 10% of the number most individuals possess. My experience in basic neuroscience research favors considerably the former over the latter.

-- Tammi Terrell

Last edited by Tammi Terrell; 04-13-2008 at 11:30 AM.
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Old 04-13-2008, 03:04 PM
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If you find this case interesting, I would like to recommend a book published in 2007 called The Brain That Changes Itself, by Norman Doidge (MD). Written for laypeople but could teach almost all doctors (and did teach me!) that the brain is a lot more adaptable than previously thought. I got several take-home messages from the book that is going to change how I approach learning, aging, etc.
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Old 04-13-2008, 04:44 PM
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There are a reasonable number of people who have had large parts of their brains removed. There are some obvious effects (like poor coordination) and some more subtle ones (as demonstrated in the "split-brain" experiments), but you could pick out other aspects of the person's cognition that are normal. A related question might be, what don't people with non-normal brains do well, or what capabilities are compromised?

ETA: Bob55, I hope your son continues to do well.

Last edited by susan; 04-13-2008 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 04-13-2008, 09:48 PM
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I've read about hydrocephalic people before. Most of them have severe neurological problems, but some live surprisingly normal lives and aren't aware they even have the condition until it is found through some unrelated event (like they have to have a head X-ray for some reason). There were a couple of cases in the early days where they autopsied a dead guy and found no brain, which caused more than a little confusion because the condition wasn't really known back then.

I've heard that even among those who live normal lives, their IQ tends to top out at about 130, which isn't at all shabby for someone whose skull is mostly water, but isn't as high as normally formed brains either.
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Old 04-14-2008, 12:25 AM
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Alright, I can't take the speculation anymore! *marches off to Google Scholar*

Note that most of the subjects in the available studies have been shunted since birth, and that's how they know they have hydrocephalus and are thus available to participate in the study. So many of these folks are not as bad off as someone who wasn't shunted. As this first study shows, before the emergence of shunting 75% of cases lead to death before adulthood.

I just picked a few studies that I found interesting. As you might expect, no, these folks are not typically without significant disabilities across the board, although some can fall into the normal range on a variety of measures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wills, 1993. Neuropsychological Functioning in Children With Spina Bifida and/or Hydrocephalus. Child's Nervous System.

Effects of Untreated HC

Three large-scale studies of HC children, conducted in the late 1950s to early 1960s before shunts were widely used, found that only 25% of untreated children survived to adulthood, and the survivors showed a vastly increased rate of serious mental retardation (Foltz & Shurtleff, 1963; Hadenius, Hagberg, Hyttnas-Bensch, & Sjogren, 1962; Hagberg, 1962; Hagberg & Sjogren, 1966; Laurence & Coates, 1962; Shurtleff, Foltz, & Loeser, 1973). Interestingly, among survivors the distribution of IQ scores at the upper end of the range seems to parallel that of the general population, in which half the children have IQ scores in the average or above average range, by definition. However, the IQ distribution among untreated children with HC is disproportionately high at the lower end of the range, where about 25% of the children have IQ scores below 50, signifying moderate to profound mental retardation (Hadenius et al., 1962; Laurence & Coate, 1962)

link
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel et al., 2005. Attention Problems and Executive Functions in Children With Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus. Child Nueropsychology.

Abstract

This study addressed the incidence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) subtypes in children with spina bifida meningomyelocele and shunted hydrocephalus (SBH) as well as differences in executive functions among these subtypes. Parent rating scales revealed that 31% of the group with SBH could be identified with AD/HD, mostly the Inattentive type (23%). The group with SBH differed from normal controls on cognitive measures of executive functions, but subtype differences were not significant. Multivariate tests showed that children with SBH were rated with greater difficulties on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) compared to controls; those with SBH and any subtype of ADHD differed from those with SBH and no ADHD; and those with ADHD (Combined Type) differed significantly from those with ADHD (Predominantly Inattentive Type). Subtype differences on univariate tests in the latter comparison were significant on the BRIEF Inhibit scale, showing more disinhibition in those with SBH and ADHD (Combined Type), but no significant differences were apparent on the BRIEF Sustain, Shift, and Initiate scales. The results show that the incidence of ADHD in children with SBH exceeds the population rate, is represented by problems with inattention rather than with impulsivity and hyperactivity; and that as with non-brain injured individuals, subtype differences in cognitive function remain to more clearly delineated.

link
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis et al., 2002. Math and Numeracy in Young Adults With Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus. Developmental Neuropsychology.

Abstract

The developmental stability of poor math skill was studied in 31 young adults with spina bifida and hydrocephalus (SBH), a neurodevelopmental disorder involving malformations of the brain and spinal cord. Longitudinally, individuals with poor math problem solving as children grew into adults with poor problem solving and limited functional numeracy. As a group, young adults with SBH had poor computation accuracy, computation speed, problem solving, and functional numeracy. Computation accuracy was related to a supporting cognitive system (working memory for numbers), and functional numeracy was related to one medical history variable (number of lifetime shunt revisions). Adult functional numeracy, but not functional literacy, was predictive of higher levels of social, personal, and community independence.

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Old 04-14-2008, 02:35 AM
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Originally Posted by WF Tomba
Little to none, as far as I can tell from reading reputable academic websites.
I've seen it widely stated that the brain contains a large proportion of structural fat. Is this not true?
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Old 04-14-2008, 04:11 AM
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engineer_comp_geek writes:

> I've heard that even among those who live normal lives, their IQ tends to top
> out at about 130, which isn't at all shabby for someone whose skull is mostly
> water, but isn't as high as normally formed brains either.

Say what? Someone with an I.Q. of 130 isn't as smart as someone with a normally formed brain? An I.Q. of 100 is average. You would only expect about one person in 40 to have an I.Q. greater than 130. I don't know what study you're quoting and I don't know how many hydrocephalics it included in its sample. It may, for instance, only have included 30 such people. That would be typical of a scientific study. If none of those people had an I.Q. higher than 130, that would be typical of a group of average people. The person who I know, Nick Patterson, has an I.Q. of at least, say, 140.

alterego writes:

> As you might expect, no, these folks are not typically without significant
> disabilities across the board, although some can fall into the normal range on a
> variety of measures.

Nobody is questioning the fact that the majority of such people are profoundly retarded. The question is why some of them have normal intelligence.
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Old 04-14-2008, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner
I don't know, but Nick Patterson, as I've mentioned, is hydrocephalic and a brilliant mathematician. I presume that his brain also has little mass, but I don't know if anyone has checked. I've seen no sign in him of any mental deficiency.
By the most amazing of coincidences, I passed this guy on the sidewalk the other day in Harvard Square. I had no idea who he was, just that he had a somewhat unusual appearance -- lumpy head and one eye closed up. Next time I run across him, I'll tell him Wendell says hello!
  #36  
Old 04-14-2008, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob55
I hope it has merit...my son has an arachnoid cyst (similar to hydrocephalus) which pushes on the brain from the outside instead of in, although they may result from strokes according to his doctor. But, as large as his is (maybe 10% of his cranial cavity but hard to put a number on it even from an MRI), he is 100% normal at 22 months. He can run and play, count to 10, knows hundreds of words, is learning the alphabet, and amazes me everyday. So I hope the brain is able to compensate for at least some loss. At least it appears to have some ability to do so thus far.
There are a surprising number of cases where a hemispherectomy (literally removing half the brain) has been performed on kids and they turned out remarkably well. Here is one such story and the young woman is headed to college (given the date of the article likely well through college at this point).

A Google turns up a surprising number of stories like this. In this article they mention the girl regained the ability to speak two languages fluently and the doctor said such recovery was not unusual in their experience with 65 such cases.

I am not suggesting your son needs anything as dramatic as this kind of surgery but offer it to let you know the brain seems much more remarkable in its ability to recover and adapt from seemingly overwhelming damage. However, children seem more able to recover than adults. I am not so sure an adult could adapt after something so dramatic (not sure).
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Old 04-14-2008, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whack-a-Mole
A Google turns up a surprising number of stories like this. In this article they mention the girl regained the ability to speak two languages fluently and the doctor said such recovery was not unusual in their experience with 65 such cases.
Quote:
Originally Posted by That Article
However, while the discovery amazed doctors at a Dutch hospital, UK experts say that in most cases, children who undergo such a drastic procedure do recover language skills.
Those stupid dutch people.
  #38  
Old 04-14-2008, 12:45 PM
alterego is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner
Nobody is questioning the fact that the majority of such people are profoundly retarded. The question is why some of them have normal intelligence.
Because "normal intelligence" has very little meaning. Intelligence is not a blanket term. These folks have deficiencies in some areas and are normal in the sense that they are average to above average in others. Notably, their intelligence quotients do not follow the typical distribution, so no, they are not "normal".
  #39  
Old 04-14-2008, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Tammi Terrell
In the end, we don't seem to know whether the individal Lorber described has/had a normal number or cortical neurons or whether he only has/had 10% of the number most individuals possess. My experience in basic neuroscience research favors considerably the former over the latter.

-- Tammi Terrell

Am I allowed to mention how cool it was to have posts on brain anomalies from someone calling herself Tammi Terrell?


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  #40  
Old 04-14-2008, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by alterego
Because "normal intelligence" has very little meaning. Intelligence is not a blanket term. These folks have deficiencies in some areas and are normal in the sense that they are average to above average in others. Notably, their intelligence quotients do not follow the typical distribution, so no, they are not "normal".
Hmm....

I wonder what distribution my own intelligence quotient follows. I assume its normal, but who knows? I should check.

-FrL-

Last edited by Frylock; 04-14-2008 at 12:50 PM.
  #41  
Old 04-14-2008, 01:37 PM
alterego is offline
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Originally Posted by Frylock
Hmm....

I wonder what distribution my own intelligence quotient follows. I assume its normal, but who knows? I should check.

-FrL-
This conversation would be better informed by multiple intelligences theory or the discussion of large scale brain organization in general. And you should check, it's good to know.
  #42  
Old 04-14-2008, 02:09 PM
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nm

Last edited by Frylock; 04-14-2008 at 02:09 PM. Reason: edited version in separate post
  #43  
Old 04-14-2008, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by alterego
This conversation would be better informed by multiple intelligences theory or the discussion of large scale brain organization in general. And you should check, it's good to know.
I know something about both those topics, but I don't think you understood the point of my comment.

You can't assign a "distribution" to a single instance. I'm sure this is not news to you, of course--it's clear you probably misspoke. You've probably got a sensible criticism of something in mind, but you haven't yet succeeded in communicating it. I was trying to illustrate the way in which you've failed to do so.

-FrL-
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