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  #1  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:20 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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Expired ID

Why is my expired driver license not considered valid identification? Despite the fact that my right to drive has expired, it still identifies me, so when presented as a tool for simple identification (unrelated to driving), the fact that it's expired should make no difference.

If I want to buy alcohol or cigarettes, I must present a 'valid photo ID' indicating I am over 21. A driver license is an obvious choice as it has a photo for physical identification as well as my full date of birth to verify legal age. Once it's expired though, I'm told that it cannot be accepted as a valid means of identifying that I'm legally allowed to purchase alcohol or cigarettes. Despite the fact that my picture is still there, my date of birth hasn't changed, and it still identifies me.

My social security card has no such expiration as a form of identification and is required to verify my identity to get the driver license to begin with. I can understand the reasons why a driver license should have an expiration related to licensing driving privileges. I can also understand that a person's physical appearance changes, sometimes before the DL expires and at least at some point after (long after) it does.

What I don't understand is why it is still not valid as a means of identification even one day after the expiration. Why can't the time of identification only validity be extended beyond the licensure validity?
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  #2  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:43 AM
Duckster Duckster is offline
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WAG.

At what chronological age are you legally considered an adult? At what chronological age can you legally drink alcohol? At what chronological age do you have to pay a higher price for a movie ticket?

Every question posed above has a single distinct answer, based upon a defined standard. One day you are a juvenile under the law and the next day an adult. This doesn't take into account your physical maturity or your emotional growth. (Yes, I known about exceptions but that's not the point.)

The points is where do you draw the line? Everyone thinks they are entitled to something above and beyond everyone else. Who gets to decide? Should we leave it as arbitrary and let it slide based on the moment and the interaction? What are the consequences? If the interaction involves the sale of alcohol, underage and a later accident, who is at fault here? Was the sale transacted because one was cute or was their potential intimidation involved?

Your license was valid yesterday. But it expired last night. Today you cannot use it to legally prove who you are. Yeah, it makes no sense. But that's the way it works. Any other comments would get me into trouble because this isn't the pit.
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  #3  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:50 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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Well, as irritated as I've been about it, I'm not dumb enough to pit it. I know very well the solution is to renew the license or present some other form of 'acceptable' identification.

That's not the point of this thread, obviously. But you hit the nail on the head with your reference to the arbitrary manner in which we treat chronological age vs. privilege to do certain things. In any case, I'm damn near 40 years old. The fact that I even have to present an ID to buy alcohol or cigarettes is irritating enough. But then to have my age-confirming identification rejected based on the fact that I'm not legally allowed to drive is...well...especially irritating.

Last edited by Brown Eyed Girl; 04-24-2008 at 10:52 AM..
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  #4  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:50 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Different WAG:

Because it would be a "real" ID able to be used by someone younger than you to gain access to more "adult" services, if you were able to get a new DL and hand off your expired one. Your (fictional for purposes of an example) younger sister would be able to run around with her very own ID, impersonating you, without the bother of having to borrow it from you and the hassle over who gets to go out drinking tonight.

Alternately, maybe it could be used by someone to take on a new identity (to evade the law or for whatever reason) and again, has the advantage of being "real".

Last edited by Ferret Herder; 04-24-2008 at 10:52 AM..
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  #5  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:53 AM
BwanaBob BwanaBob is offline
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Not a factual answer, but some places just like to draw a line in the sand so that they don't get sued if it turns out your "expired" ID is a fake. I think the liability is different if you present what appears to be "active" ID and it turns out to be fake.

Sometimes its just irrationality on the part of the bouncer. I had a college roommate who was older than me (slightly) and very slender of frame (he looked really young). We're both born in 1959. We were trying to get in a bar but the bouncer wouldn't let him in.
He challenges the bouncer as to the reason. Bouncer claims the license looks tampered with, that the year 1957 was changed to 1959 by closing the loop on the 7. I'm standing there and I say to the bouncer "So you're saying he fudged the license to make himself 2 years younger. What sense does that make?"
Bouncer vapor locks, then says, "Neither of you can come in". This little bit of lunacy happened 30 years ago and it still bothers me.

It's best to just have ID that is current. It's not worth arguing with pinheads.
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  #6  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:54 AM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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Good point, Ferret Herder.
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  #7  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:57 AM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferret Herder
Because it would be a "real" ID able to be used by someone younger than you to gain access to more "adult" services, if you were able to get a new DL and hand off your expired one. Your (fictional for purposes of an example) younger sister would be able to run around with her very own ID, impersonating you, without the bother of having to borrow it from you and the hassle over who gets to go out drinking tonight.
It's a good theory, but if you were going to hand it off you could just do so before it expired and say yours was lost or stolen.

Last edited by Really Not All That Bright; 04-24-2008 at 10:57 AM..
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  #8  
Old 04-24-2008, 11:17 AM
Ferret Herder Ferret Herder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright
It's a good theory, but if you were going to hand it off you could just do so before it expired and say yours was lost or stolen.
... Damn. I was going to say something about "well maybe lost/stolen old IDs get flagged in databases as being invalid for that reason and expired just do because they're expired" but very few places actually scan the strip on the ID.

OK, I have no idea then.
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  #9  
Old 04-24-2008, 12:13 PM
Jayrot Jayrot is offline
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I imagine it relies heavily on the slippery slope argument.

What if a license has been expired for 25 years? It's probably not even the same style as the current ones and barely recognizable as an official identification. ("It's an older code, but it checks out" /SW) You might say that 25 years expired is too much, but there should be a grace period of, say, 5 years. But then, really, isn't the real expiration date really just 5 years later? Why not just make that the official expiration date?

Last edited by Jayrot; 04-24-2008 at 12:14 PM..
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  #10  
Old 04-24-2008, 12:15 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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I suspect, along those lines, that it has a lot to do with the primary goal of American business - not causing offense.

If a 50-year-old woman tries to buy a six-pack and hands you her drivers' license from the year she was Miss Idaho, do you really want to be the one telling her she doesn't look like that anymore?
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  #11  
Old 04-24-2008, 12:41 PM
Barrett Bonden Barrett Bonden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferret Herder
Because it would be a "real" ID able to be used by someone younger than you to gain access to more "adult" services, if you were able to get a new DL and hand off your expired one. Your (fictional for purposes of an example) younger sister would be able to run around with her very own ID, impersonating you, without the bother of having to borrow it from you and the hassle over who gets to go out drinking tonight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright
It's a good theory, but if you were going to hand it off you could just do so before it expired and say yours was lost or stolen.
Ferret Herder, your explanation is the one given to us in a server's training session that I recently attended.

Really Not All That Bright, it's true that someone could thwart the system as you describe, but only for the life of the ID. An older sibling might be willing to hand over an expired ID, but it's a lot more trouble (and potential consequences) to pretend to have lost your sole valid ID, especially when the owner of the ID doesn't stand to benefit.

Last edited by Barrett Bonden; 04-24-2008 at 12:42 PM..
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  #12  
Old 04-24-2008, 01:01 PM
Otto Otto is offline
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You are all overlooking the obvious answer.

Every time you get a new state-issued ID, it costs you money and generates revenue for the state. If an expired ID were a valid form of identification, a certain segment of the population would have no incentive to spend the money to get a new one and the state would lose out on that revenue. It's the same reason why license plate tags expire every year.
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  #13  
Old 04-24-2008, 01:04 PM
Harmonious Discord Harmonious Discord is offline
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Consider that you're legally bound to keep a driver's license up to date with your new address, and an expired one doesn't require by law any current information. The address is often what they want to verify.

Last edited by Harmonious Discord; 04-24-2008 at 01:04 PM..
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  #14  
Old 04-24-2008, 01:07 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrett Bonden
Really Not All That Bright, it's true that someone could thwart the system as you describe, but only for the life of the ID. An older sibling might be willing to hand over an expired ID, but it's a lot more trouble (and potential consequences) to pretend to have lost your sole valid ID, especially when the owner of the ID doesn't stand to benefit.
What potential consequences? If your brother/sister gets caught with it, they was stolen. I know plenty of kids who gave theirs to siblings.

As for standing to benefit, getting your sister to give you fifty bucks/do your chores/whatever is usually benefit enough.
Quote:
If an expired ID were a valid form of identification, a certain segment of the population would have no incentive to spend the money to get a new one and the state would lose out on that revenue.
That's an obvious reason why drivers' licenses expire. It doesn't explain why they can't be used to identify the bearer after expiration.
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  #15  
Old 04-24-2008, 01:28 PM
Barrett Bonden Barrett Bonden is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright
I know plenty of kids who gave theirs to siblings.
You know plenty of kids who gave their valid license to their siblings? Or who gave an expired license to their siblings?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright
That's an obvious reason why drivers' licenses expire. It doesn't explain why they can't be used to identify the bearer after expiration.
I told you the party line we were given. For what it's worth, I understand the reasoning. Most licensed drivers have at least one expired license; that's a huge pool of potential fake IDs. Removing them from use makes vendors' lives a lot easier. It doesn't make things easier for people who don't drive. I'm not shocked that vendors care more about their own convenience than someone else's.
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  #16  
Old 04-24-2008, 01:30 PM
Otto Otto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright
That's an obvious reason why drivers' licenses expire. It doesn't explain why they can't be used to identify the bearer after expiration.
I've had periods since I had my license where I didn't drive, but I kept the license. Why? Because I needed a valid ID and the state mandated that my expired ID was not valid. I could have gotten a state ID but those cost money and expire too.

Last edited by Otto; 04-24-2008 at 01:31 PM..
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  #17  
Old 04-24-2008, 04:52 PM
DSYoungEsq DSYoungEsq is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto
You are all overlooking the obvious answer.

Every time you get a new state-issued ID, it costs you money and generates revenue for the state. If an expired ID were a valid form of identification, a certain segment of the population would have no incentive to spend the money to get a new one and the state would lose out on that revenue. It's the same reason why license plate tags expire every year.
Which says nothing about why businesses insist upon a "valid" driver's license to confirm identity for a variety of things, since those have nothing to do with state laws.
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  #18  
Old 04-24-2008, 05:02 PM
Guinastasia Guinastasia is offline
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Is it because you no longer drive? Most states offer an ID card you can get at the DMV, if you don't have a driver's license. That's what I have.
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  #19  
Old 04-24-2008, 05:48 PM
accidentalyuppie accidentalyuppie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl
Why is my expired driver license not considered valid identification?
What I don't understand is why it is still not valid as a means of identification even one day after the expiration. Why can't the time of identification only validity be extended beyond the licensure validity?
Because people aren't as careful as they should be with expired licenses, and often keep them in the back of a sock drawer of the pocket of an old purse and don't even remember that they're there. If your valid license goes missing you usually notice it right away.

And there would be somewhat of a market for expired licenses, to be used or illicit purposes. Many people could be tempted to sell or give away their expired license, while hardly anyone would sell their valid license.

So the issue is not that your expired license fails to prove who you are. It's just that by not accepting them as valid ID our government is throwing up a roadblock to teen alcohol abuse and making sure the terrorists don't win.
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  #20  
Old 04-24-2008, 06:11 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barrett Bonden
You know plenty of kids who gave their valid license to their siblings? Or who gave an expired license to their siblings?
Yes. That's how high school kids get beer, for the most part. Well, the ones I went to school with, anyway.
Quote:
I told you the party line we were given. For what it's worth, I understand the reasoning. Most licensed drivers have at least one expired license; that's a huge pool of potential fake IDs. Removing them from use makes vendors' lives a lot easier. It doesn't make things easier for people who don't drive. I'm not shocked that vendors care more about their own convenience than someone else's.
I'm not saying it isn't sound reasoning. I just don't think it's the actual reasoning. Most states require that you turn in your old license when you get a new one, anyway. In Florida and Connecticut (among others) if you renew your license after expires you must return the old one, or you have to retake the test.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSYoungEsq
Which says nothing about why businesses insist upon a "valid" driver's license to confirm identity for a variety of things, since those have nothing to do with state laws.
Otto - what he said.
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  #21  
Old 04-24-2008, 06:11 PM
sweeteviljesus sweeteviljesus is offline
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I used to be a doorman and I routinely accepted expired IDs. I would often demand a credit card as supplemental ID. In Texas, only a valid driver's license or ID is valid for identification purposes. Since this was in a college town, refusing to accept out-of-state driver's licenses or passports would cost you half your business. Basically, I could accept anything I wanted to for proof of age, but my actions would only be defensible in court if I was presented with the approved IDs. As to why I sometimes refused to accept an expired ID, it was either because I heard the TABC was on the prowl (screw with them at your peril) or because I didn't want to let them in for another reason (usually because they were already drunk). Pointing out that the ID was expired led to fewer conflicts.

FWIW,
Rob
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  #22  
Old 04-24-2008, 06:47 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guinastasia
Is it because you no longer drive? Most states offer an ID card you can get at the DMV, if you don't have a driver's license. That's what I have.
Honestly, it's because I have some issues with child support (for my son) that resulted in a suspended license. I can't drive with it, but it worked perfectly fine for ID until it expired. I'm hoping the support issue gets sorted out this month so I can renew it before I move. In the meantime, I'll probably just go get a state ID. It's funny, even the county won't accept it as verification of my identity despite the fact that I've presented every other acceptable form of ID (i.e., birth cert, marriage cert, SS card, proof of residence, etc.) right in front of their stupid faces and they have copies of all on file. It's been a mess that I've, unfortunately, neglected cleaning up for too long.

I have a handful of old DLs from various states I've collected since I've started driving. I can't recall ever being asked for it back when I renewed, so I can understand the restrictions in place from the fraud point-of-view. It's just weird (and annoying) that one day this card confirms who I am, where I live and how old I am and the next day, it doesn't confirm squat.
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  #23  
Old 04-24-2008, 08:59 PM
Fubaya Fubaya is offline
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Just think about the law and come up with a way to word it so an expired license could be used to purchase alcohol/tobacco/pornography/6-gallons-of-cough-syrup/etc. You really can't.

The law requires a valid ID for purchase of alcohol. The lawmakers could take the word "valid" out of the law. But if the ID isn't required to be valid, can I print something off my computer and use that?
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  #24  
Old 04-24-2008, 09:50 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto
You are all overlooking the obvious answer.

Every time you get a new state-issued ID, it costs you money and generates revenue for the state. If an expired ID were a valid form of identification, a certain segment of the population would have no incentive to spend the money to get a new one and the state would lose out on that revenue. It's the same reason why license plate tags expire every year.
I have often wondered about this exact question. When my license expires, I'm still the same person with the same identity. The only thing that has changed is my legal right to drive.

This explanation is the only one that makes sense. Too many people would just continue driving with their expired license, figuring what are the odds of getting pulled over for any reason . . . and they'll deal with the consequences if they occur. But to be unable to support their habits . . . that's serious.

A big purpose of any governmental agency is to continue raising revenue to support its own existence and keep their jobs. They need to give you an incentive to pay your fees in a timely manner. So they make it harder for you to support your habits till you pay up. But then again there are guys like me who neither smoke nor drink; besides, at 62, they're more likely to want my ID for a senior discount.

But I'm wondering about some of the comments here: when you get a new license, don't they keep the old one? Are there states in which they don't? Isn't that just asking for abuse? Of course, there are the "lost" ones, real or otherwise.
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  #25  
Old 04-24-2008, 10:07 PM
Really Not All That Bright Really Not All That Bright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fubaya
The law requires a valid ID for purchase of alcohol. The lawmakers could take the word "valid" out of the law. But if the ID isn't required to be valid, can I print something off my computer and use that?
No, that's the whole point. AFAIK, state laws usually don't require that you present a valid ID - they require that you present something to the cashier that establishes your identity and age.

You could just as easily show them a passport or something.

In Florida, you can legally purchase a valid ID from any schmuck on the street; said schmuck is required to obtain a certified copy of a proof of age document from you, and a signed affidavit, and that's about it.

Quote:
877.18 Identification card or document purporting to contain applicant's age or date of birth; penalties for failure to comply with requirements for sale or issuance.--

(1) It is unlawful for any person, except a governmental agency or instrumentality, to sell or issue, or to offer to sell or issue, in this state any identification card or document purporting to contain the age or date of birth of the person in whose name it was issued, unless:

(a) Prior to selling or issuing such card or document, the person has first obtained from the applicant and retains for a period of 3 years from the date of sale:

1. An authenticated or certified copy of proof of age as provided in s. 1003.21(4); and

2. A notarized affidavit from the applicant attesting to the applicant's age and that the proof-of-age document required by subparagraph 1. is for such applicant.

(b) Prior to offering to sell such cards in this state, the person has included in any offer for sale of identification cards or documents that such cards cannot be sold or issued without the applicants' first submitting the documents required by paragraph (a).

(c) The identification card or document contains the business name and street address of the person selling or issuing such card or document.

(2) For the purposes of this section, the term "offer to sell" includes every inducement, solicitation, attempt, or printed or media advertisement to encourage a person to purchase an identification card.

(3) All records required to be maintained by this section shall be available for inspection without warrant upon reasonable demand by any law enforcement officer, including, but not limited to, a state attorney investigator or an investigator for the Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco.

(4) A person who violates the provisions of this section is guilty of a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084. The failure to produce the documents required by subsection (1), upon lawful request therefor, is prima facie evidence of a violation of this section.

(5) The state attorney for any county in which a violation of this section occurs or the Attorney General may enjoin any sale or offer for sale in violation of this section by temporary and permanent injunction by application to any court of competent jurisdiction.
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  #26  
Old 04-25-2008, 07:34 AM
SmackFu SmackFu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Really Not All That Bright
It's a good theory, but if you were going to hand it off you could just do so before it expired and say yours was lost or stolen.
I think the difference is that involves effort and money for the valid license holder to replace it, while giving away your expired license does not.
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  #27  
Old 04-25-2008, 11:49 AM
iamthewalrus(:3= iamthewalrus(:3= is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fubaya
Just think about the law and come up with a way to word it so an expired license could be used to purchase alcohol/tobacco/pornography/6-gallons-of-cough-syrup/etc. You really can't.
How about this: "A state issued drivers license or ID card is valid as identification in perpetuity. The printed expiration date on a state issued drivers license affects only the license to drive, and not the card's validity as legal identification."

I agree with the OP. There's no particular reason that an ID card can't be valid indefinitely. One's identity isn't something that changes.

Now, you can say that people would be using licenses with pictures that don't identify them any more, but it won't really happen that often, since most people will regularly update their licenses in order to drive, and it's not limited to expired licenses. I got my driver's license photo taken when I was 17, with hair down to my shoulders. I didn't get another one taken for 8 years, and I looked very different. But my id was still valid.
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Old 04-25-2008, 03:43 PM
Apocalypso Apocalypso is offline
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A bartender once refused to serve a GF because of an invalid ID (she was 28 and clearly didn't look underage).

My $.02 is that a persons appearance can change to the point where the original photo can no longer be used to accurately identify them. How different did you look 10 years ago? PA Identification cards are valid for 4 years, which seems like a reasonable cutoff point.
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  #29  
Old 04-25-2008, 04:18 PM
gotpasswords gotpasswords is offline
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Interestingly, my California drivers license has this on the back:

This License is issued as a license to drive a motor vehicle; it does not establish eligibility for employment, voter registration, or public benefits.

Doesn't say anything about being used for personal identification. I don't have the time to dig further, but I'd imagine there's a specific law or two in the civil code that defines a drivers license as personal identification as well as a license to drive.
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  #30  
Old 04-25-2008, 04:51 PM
amarinth amarinth is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by panache45
But I'm wondering about some of the comments here: when you get a new license, don't they keep the old one? Are there states in which they don't?
In Washington State, they punch a hole through the old one and give it back to you. I think I've still got every license I've ever had. When I'm doing something where I don't need a valid license to drive, but might need to be identified (e.g., jogging around the neighborhood) I'll carry one of the expired licenses.
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  #31  
Old 04-25-2008, 05:14 PM
Musicat Musicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamthewalrus(:3=
How about this: "A state issued drivers license or ID card is valid as identification in perpetuity. The printed expiration date on a state issued drivers license affects only the license to drive, and not the card's validity as legal identification."
Naaah...too logical.

The day after my license expires, it is just as good as it was the day before if all you need is age verification. Expiration has nothing to do with that unless you can reverse time. The problem lies in the wording "valid". The criterion for validity for ID shouldn't be the same as driving.

The idea that requiring an UNexpired DL for age verification prevents a black market in expired docs is an after-the-fact rationalization. Use of an ID that is not yours is asking for trouble to begin with, expired or not.
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  #32  
Old 04-25-2008, 05:40 PM
iamthewalrus(:3= iamthewalrus(:3= is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apocalypso
My $.02 is that a persons appearance can change to the point where the original photo can no longer be used to accurately identify them. How different did you look 10 years ago? PA Identification cards are valid for 4 years, which seems like a reasonable cutoff point.
I don't know about PA, but in CA, even though we get new licenses every few years, we don't get a new photo taken nearly as often. I had a new photo taken 8 years after my first one (and then again a few months later, since I got a motorcycle license. I got into a nice little quasi-licensed state, for a week or so, too. When they issued me the paper license, they punched a hole in my old license. They punched it right through the year in the expiration date. Luckily, the bouncer at my local bar recognized me, but I did have to speak to a manager at the grocery store when I tried to buy beer). The two intervening license replacements were just issued with the same old photo.

Plus, the issue of a photo not looking like the person is orthogonal to the issue of an expired license. Regardless of whether the license is expired, if you can't identify the bearer as the person in the photo, then it's not valid identification. Similarly, if you can identify the bearer, and it looks like a legitimate state-issued license, then it shouldn't matter if it's expired.

The black market argument is sort of a non-starter, too. You can get a replacement license for $12 in CA (claim the original was lost or stolen). I can't imagine that that would be a serious economic obstacle for the illicit false id market.
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  #33  
Old 04-25-2008, 05:55 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamthewalrus(:3=
Plus, the issue of a photo not looking like the person is orthogonal to the issue of an expired license. Regardless of whether the license is expired, if you can't identify the bearer as the person in the photo, then it's not valid identification. Similarly, if you can identify the bearer, and it looks like a legitimate state-issued license, then it shouldn't matter if it's expired.
That's all I'm saying.
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  #34  
Old 04-25-2008, 06:01 PM
guizot guizot is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Eyed Girl
Why is my expired driver license not considered valid identification?
No one in this thread has had the heart to break it to you, Brown Eyes, so I guess it's up to me.

When your driver's license expired, you expired. You are no longer valid. You mean nothing. You are void and null. You don't count. Zero. Nada. Zilch. 무, 微不足道的事(或人), 何もない, nichts
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  #35  
Old 04-25-2008, 06:09 PM
Balthisar Balthisar is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Nanjing, China
Posts: 8,924
Doesn't Arizona still give out licenses for life, or at least long enough that all of the points above are invalidated?
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  #36  
Old 04-25-2008, 06:30 PM
Brown Eyed Girl Brown Eyed Girl is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by guizot
When your driver's license expired, you expired. You are no longer valid. You mean nothing. You are void and null. You don't count. Zero. Nada. Zilch. 무, 微不足道的事(或人), 何もない, nichts
Heh.

I can't count the number of days I've actually felt like that. A little humor goes a long way.
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  #37  
Old 04-25-2008, 06:54 PM
Patty O'Furniture Patty O'Furniture is offline
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Join Date: May 1999
It's possible you could have changed your name or gone to Jenny Craig or gotten a new set of eyes or something. Also, having ID's checked periodically at bars and restaurants and such is a good way of getting the fake ones out of circulation.

Furthermore, as license technology improves (holograms, barcodes and such), people must be forced to renew in order to get the upgraded version. You didn't think Bill Gates was the first to come up with that idea did you?

There probably exists somewhere a study showing that the chances of an ID being fake or in the hands of the wrong person increases in direct proportion to the age of the ID card itself. So forcing people to renew every five years is just another layer in the birthday cake of national security.
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