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  #1  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:05 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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Risk of adult woman being abducted

I had a conversation at lunch today in which a co-worker commented on how dangerous the world is today, saying that she is nervous about traveling long distances alone and always worries about her grown daughers traveling by themselves. I said that the odds of being an adult woman being abducted are probably less than being struck by lightning, but she watches a lot of TV (Greta van Susteren?) and says that abductions are a lot more frequent than I would think. I tried googling for stats, but came up dry.
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  #2  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:10 PM
The Great Philosopher The Great Philosopher is offline
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I took upon myself the mammoth task of googling "kidnapping" and came up with...

Quote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kidnapp..._United_States

The National Crime Information Center maintains a roster of missing persons, and groups them into categories. In 2008, there were 778,161 missing person reports logged on their system, of which 745,088 were eventually removed. Of those reported missing, 87,497 were listed as being in physical danger, and 20,562 were listed as being missing involuntarily.

Of the 589,761 juveniles reported missing in 2008, 13,046 were considered to have been in physical danger. Of those, 6,094 were considered to be missing involuntarily. Although the FBI does not maintain official statistics of the crime of kidnapping, presumably those known or suspected to have been kidnapped would fall under the "involuntary" category.

As the United States is estimated to have a population of about 304 million people[3], if 20,561 persons were reported kidnapped in 2008, it would amount to a kidnapping rate of 6.7 per 100,000 persons; as the United States is estimated to have a population of about 74 million persons under age 18[4], it would amount to a kidnapping rate among persons under 18 of 8.2 per 100,000.

According to the National Crime Information Center:

As of December 20, 2007, there were 7,105,229 active missing person records in NCIC. Juveniles under the age of 18 accounted for 54,648 (51.93%) of the records, and 12,362 (11.75%) were for juveniles between the ages of 18 and 20. During 2007, 814,967 missing person records were entered into the 836,131 records entered in 2006. Missing person records cleared or cancelled during the same period totaled 820,212. Reasons for these removals include: the subject was located by a law enforcement agency; the individual returned home; or the record had to be removed by the entering agency due to a determination that the record was invalid. In 2007, there were 518 records entered as Abducted by a Stranger; 299,787 entered as Runaway; and 2,919 entered as Abducted by Non-Custodial Parent. This only accounts for 303,224 entries of the 418,967 entered, or 72.4%, which is an increase from 297,632 entries of the 836,131 entered, or 35.6%, in 2006. The Missing Person Circumstances field is optional and has been available since July 1999 when the NCIC 2000 came on-line. This is not an accurate reflection of the actual circumstances of all the entries.

It should be noted that the 814,967 figure merely represents the number of missing persons reported, regardless of whether they were later confirmed to have been kidnapped or abducted.
Not sure if that answers your question...
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  #3  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:13 PM
The Great Philosopher The Great Philosopher is offline
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Just for comparison the odds of being struck by lightning are about 1 in 3 million, so unfortunately it seems like there's a much higher chance of being abducted.
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  #4  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:17 PM
The Great Philosopher The Great Philosopher is offline
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Also, just to point out, being worried about your daughters traveling alone wouldn't just be fear of abduction, it would be of any of the other horrible things that could happen as well: rape and sexual assault wouldn't be counted in those abduction figures for instance, and sadly they're probably both a lot more likely to happen. I don't think it's particularly unreasonable for a woman to worry about traveling long distances alone - certainly if it involved traveling at night or abroad anyway.
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  #5  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:29 PM
maladroit maladroit is offline
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I've always been under the impression that the biggest danger to women of reproductive age is their men, rather than random strangers. Not suggesting solo midnight strolls down dark alleys, and I always look around me in parking lots and have my car keys in hand. I'll go look for some statistics now.
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  #6  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:37 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher View Post
I took upon myself the mammoth task of googling "kidnapping" and came up with...



Not sure if that answers your question...
Not really, although it gives some rough leads. I'm looking for the number of adults kidnapped by strangers. You can't quite get that from that page, but if 518 people were abducted by strangers in 2007, that's a rate of about 1 in 580,000 for the entire population. The adult population is almost 200 million, so if a little over half are women, and all of the victims of abduction by strangers are adult women, that gives a rate of about 1 in 200,000.

The problem is that I imagine the total number of stranger abductions is higher (since people will go missing under unknown circumstances), but only a small percentage of those will be adults.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher
Just for comparison the odds of being struck by lightning are about 1 in 3 million, so unfortunately it seems like there's a much higher chance of being abducted.
According to The National Weather Service, the odds are about 1/500,000 per year. And 1/5000 over a lifetime.
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  #7  
Old 09-04-2009, 01:41 PM
Rigamarole Rigamarole is offline
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Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher View Post
Also, just to point out, being worried about your daughters traveling alone wouldn't just be fear of abduction, it would be of any of the other horrible things that could happen as well: rape and sexual assault wouldn't be counted in those abduction figures for instance, and sadly they're probably both a lot more likely to happen.
My thoughts exactly when reading the OP: who said anything about being "abducted"? She doesn't want to get raped.
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  #8  
Old 09-04-2009, 02:01 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher View Post
Also, just to point out, being worried about your daughters traveling alone wouldn't just be fear of abduction, it would be of any of the other horrible things that could happen as well: rape and sexual assault wouldn't be counted in those abduction figures for instance, and sadly they're probably both a lot more likely to happen. I don't think it's particularly unreasonable for a woman to worry about traveling long distances alone - certainly if it involved traveling at night or abroad anyway.
True, but she was especially afraid of being abducted while driving in her car between towns. If you have stats on the number of violent crimes per mile traveled, that would be great! I wanted to focus on what seemed to be her greatest fear first (and what I specifically claimed was less likely than being struck by lightening) but I think all of her fears are overblown. Not that rape isn't something to be scared of, but
as maladroit pointed out, the real danger is from family and aquaintences, not people in dark alleys or lonely roads.
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  #9  
Old 09-04-2009, 02:11 PM
Zsofia Zsofia is offline
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Well, define "traveling". There are definitely parts of Central and South America where abduction by strangers is a much, much bigger concern than it is in the US.
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  #10  
Old 09-04-2009, 02:13 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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Just to clarify the backstory a little bit, the conversation started off talking about a movie in which someone was kidnapped by cannibals after making a wrong turn. I think the movie was called "Kidnapped by Cannibals." My co-worker opined that while they might not be cannibals, there were people out there who might kidnap you if you took a wrong turn, and she was scared of them. When I said those fears are more creatures of the media than realistic dangers to worry about, she and another woman brought up things like car-jackings and blue-light rapists, but I mostly wanted to counter her fear of cannibals kidnappers.

ETA - That's a good point, Zsofia, but I'm just interested in US statistics. I don't even want to know what horrors my co-worker thinks might lurk beyond our borders!

Last edited by Alan Smithee; 09-04-2009 at 02:15 PM..
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  #11  
Old 09-04-2009, 02:37 PM
griffin1977 griffin1977 is offline
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Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post
Just to clarify the backstory a little bit, the conversation started off talking about a movie in which someone was kidnapped by cannibals after making a wrong turn. I think the movie was called "Kidnapped by Cannibals." My co-worker opined that while they might not be cannibals, there were people out there who might kidnap you if you took a wrong turn, and she was scared of them. When I said those fears are more creatures of the media than realistic dangers to worry about, she and another woman brought up things like car-jackings and blue-light rapists, but I mostly wanted to counter her fear of cannibals kidnappers.
The key point is violence from STRANGERS is vanishingly rare. The chances of randomly taking a wrong turn and ending up kidnapped/murdered/eaten is orders of magnitude lower than the total rate of kidnapping/murder/canaballism in the country as a whole.

So while the chance of an adult getting kidnapped is not lower than that chance of getting struck by lightning, the chances of getting randomly kidnapped by someone you never met before probably is.
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  #12  
Old 09-04-2009, 02:42 PM
Swallowed My Cellphone Swallowed My Cellphone is offline
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Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post
True, but she was especially afraid of being abducted while driving in her car between towns. If you have stats on the number of violent crimes per mile traveled, that would be great! I wanted to focus on what seemed to be her greatest fear first (and what I specifically claimed was less likely than being struck by lightening) but I think all of her fears are overblown.
In 1990 a 21 year old student named Linda Shaw went missing as she drove from her family home in Brampton, Ontario to the University of Western Ontario (barely a two hour drive). I think she was returning to school after the Easter vacation, driving alone at night. DNA evidence confirmed the identity of her killer almost 15 years later.

It was considered a huge big deal because such a random crime (and therefore exceptionally difficult to solve) was so highly unusual. Most disappearances are not "total stranger" type of abductions. It got tons of media attention because it was so remarkably rare and was a "worst nightmare" scenario for so many people.

But your co-worker needs some common sense. Evil predators/serial killers/cannibals are not going to wait for the one-in-a-million chance that someone out of pure happenstance will make a wrong turn, AND will be alone, AND will be relatively helpless, AND will have a breakdown, etc.

Tell your co-worker the cannibals are far more likely to stalk her for awhile, get used to her daily routine, and then strike when they know she is most vulnerable.

ETA: Could someone pass the ketchup?

Last edited by Swallowed My Cellphone; 09-04-2009 at 02:43 PM..
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  #13  
Old 09-04-2009, 03:35 PM
Harriet the Spry Harriet the Spry is offline
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Originally Posted by maladroit View Post
I've always been under the impression that the biggest danger to women of reproductive age is their men, rather than random strangers. Not suggesting solo midnight strolls down dark alleys, and I always look around me in parking lots and have my car keys in hand. I'll go look for some statistics now.
True, but most women live their lives in a way to limit their vulnerability to attacks from strangers. It doesn't mean those attacks wouldn't happen if women were less careful.
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  #14  
Old 09-04-2009, 10:52 PM
Sage Rat Sage Rat is online now
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Originally Posted by Harriet the Spry View Post
True, but most women live their lives in a way to limit their vulnerability to attacks from strangers. It doesn't mean those attacks wouldn't happen if women were less careful.
No, but even so, nearly all attacks on a person will come from someone they know. In general, the three precursors to a person committing a crime are:

Stress - Losing a job, being dumped, death in the family, needing money, etc.
Interest - As in, in a particular individual, type of person, political thought, or business
Opportunity - As it says

Items #2 and #3 describe why it's generally true that a person is attacked or kidnapped by someone they know. He will either be specifically interested in you, or know you well enough to be able to spot an opportunity.

If a woman truly wanted to be safe, her best bet would be to avoid men who have become stressed in their life. This is when we are most likely to react irrationally. (The same holds true for women as well, of course, but statistically speaking it's principally men who act out in such cases.)
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  #15  
Old 09-05-2009, 01:03 AM
even sven even sven is online now
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As a woman who travels regularly alone at home and abroad, with the attitude of "If they rape me, they rape me, but hell if I'm going to live a half-lived life because of a bunch of asshole rapists", I too would be interested in some statistics. It seems to me that a lot of women convince themselves to miss a lot of life because of irrational fears.

It seems to me, from the statistics, you are far more likely to end up dead/raped/missing hanging out at home with your boyfriend than going on a nice trip taking basic safety precautions. Can any of you number crunchers confirm this?
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  #16  
Old 09-05-2009, 06:46 AM
Xema Xema is online now
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The website of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children gives this (from several years ago, apparently out of a total of over 70 million children):
Quote:
115 children were the victims of “stereotypical” kidnapping. These crimes involve someone the child does not know, or knows only slightly, who holds the child overnight, transports the child 50 miles or more, kills the child, demands ransom, or intends to keep the child permanently.
It's not clear how this relates to the abduction of non-juveniles. But I think it suggests this is much rarer than it is often thought to be.
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  #17  
Old 09-05-2009, 10:03 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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According to statistics I read just recently, the number of children kidnapped by strangers each year in the U.S. is somewhere are 110. In comparison, about 75 people are killed by lightning each year (and about 600 are struck by lightning). I don't know what the number of adult women kidnapped each year is, but I suspect it's considerably less than the number of children kidnapped by strangers. Kidnapping an adult is harder than kidnapping a child. I suspect that most of the adults that are kidnapped are for ransom. I therefore suspect that the number of women abducted each year is less than the number killed by lightning.

Of course, this isn't all the ways that women can be hurt. They could be raped or killed or assaulted. I don't understand what that has to do with long-distance travelling in any case. If you're going to be kidnapped or raped or killed or assaulted, that could happen near home just as easy as far away from home. If someone wants to be safe, they shouldn't go to dangerous places. A dangerous place could be a nearby park that isn't safe at night. It could be home, when a women's husband is obviously violent and angry.
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  #18  
Old 09-05-2009, 10:14 AM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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I would like to see a breakdown in the numbers of unarmed women who are abducted, versus:

the number of women who have a license for concealed carry, or otherwise carry a handgun who were abducted.

Its my understanding that armed women are rarely abducted, if at all.
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  #19  
Old 09-05-2009, 10:28 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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It's probably impossible to tell. As I said, the number of adult American women abducted each year is probably pretty small, well under 100. Not very many people are carrying handguns at any point, so not very many of that small amount of abducted women are carrying handguns. That's too small a sample to draw any deduction from.
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  #20  
Old 09-05-2009, 10:48 AM
Sage Rat Sage Rat is online now
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FBI statistics from here:

http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/08aprelim/downloads.htm

Forcible rape average for all cities listed in table 4: 112 per 100,000

You'll note that the Wikipedia gives a lower number (~32 per 100,000). This may be because they are getting their data from a different source, or more likely because it includes rural areas, not just cities. For someone living in a city, the 112 figure will probably be more accurate.

73% of women who are raped, know their attacker (according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics).

As is everyone else, I'm having the darnedest time finding statistics on non-child abductions. This probably gives a better indication than anything of the frequency of it.
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  #21  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:03 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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I'm not sure what the rape statistics have to do with the abduction statistics. Kidnapping an adult and keeping them a long time is a lot harder than raping a woman. Rape is presumably vastly more common than abduction.
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  #22  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:07 AM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Originally Posted by Sage Rat View Post


73% of women who are raped, know their attacker
What does that have to do with anything?

That seems kind of a meaningless statistic.

73% of rapists are "friends or aquaintances"?????? - I think they mean: 73% are aquaintances because friends dont do that. According to the FBI's definition of aquaintance, the definition of attacker is "NOT" unknown.

Why does it matter if the attacker was never seen before, or if the attacker was known in the neighborhood? Is it better that a victim can say anything other than he cant be identified at all? So what if you had seen this guy once before in the local bar last month?

If a woman is gang-raped by the local gang in the neighborhood, they are all "aquaintances" as far as the FBI and this statistic is concerned.

Besides, for incest rape that statistic is 100%, and incest rape is not any better than rape by a complete stranger.
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  #23  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:13 AM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
I'm not sure what the rape statistics have to do with the abduction statistics. Kidnapping an adult and keeping them a long time is a lot harder than raping a woman. Rape is presumably vastly more common than abduction.
It doesnt have to be a long time, nor even a different place. OJ Simpson was charged with kidnapping in that hotel robbery and the victim was still in his own room.

Rape and abduction/kidnapping of unarmed women go together like peanut butter and jelly - I would guess that rape is the most common motive for kidnapping women.
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  #24  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:15 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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The point of the statistic is to warn women that the fact that they know a man (and sometimes know him pretty well) doesn't mean that he won't rape her.
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  #25  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:21 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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My point is that simple rape is probably vastly more common than abducting a woman and then repeatedly raping her. Don't go arbitrarily playing around with the definition of kidnapping. Grabbing a woman in a dark alley and holding her down as one rapes her before letting her go is rape, not kidnapping. As I said, I think that kidnapping an adult woman is actually fairly rare, and I suspect that most of the time it's about money rather than rape.
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  #26  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:35 AM
CC CC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xema View Post
The website of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children gives this (from several years ago, apparently out of a total of over 70 million children): It's not clear how this relates to the abduction of non-juveniles. But I think it suggests this is much rarer than it is often thought to be.
This has been pointed to by a number of researchers and writers (Richard Louv - The Last Child In The Woods, or Barry Glassner - The Culture of Fear, from 1999, by the way, would be good examples). This underlies the essential idea of the OP - that the perception of danger and threat greatly exceeds the probability of harm. In our recently mega-enhanced culture of fear, everyone has heard of cases of abduction, assault, endangerment, kidnapping, etc. If you read the newspapers or watch television, you can barely see anything else. That increases the amount of fear and the estimation of chances of danger, but doesn't increase the amount of crime.
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  #27  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:54 AM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post

The adult population is almost 200 million, so if a little over half are women, and all of the victims of abduction by strangers are adult women, that gives a rate of about 1 in 200,000.

According to The National Weather Service, the odds are about 1/500,000 per year. And 1/5000 over a lifetime.
I would imagine that very few/almost none elderly women are abducted.

If you further narrow down your statistics to unarmed women under 50 or so, wouldnt you then get closer to 1 in 100,000 per year? ..................

................... and therefore 1/2000 per 50 year lifetime.


1 in 2000 would mean that maybe half of us actually know someone who was abducted/raped, which does not really sound unrealistic, and maybe even a little high, yet, a definite risk, and certainly nobody would want to fly in a commercial airliner with that level of risk .

IF its anywhere close to 1/2000 then that could be a legitimate risk and something to worry about or to defend against.

YOu could also add in all the UNsuccessful abductions that may have been attempted but not completed and didnt get into the statistics - attempted abdutions that were intended, prevented or fought off, to get an even better idea of the need to think of whether there is a real need to being prepared for self defense.

Last edited by Susanann; 09-05-2009 at 11:58 AM..
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  #28  
Old 09-05-2009, 11:59 AM
Freudian Slit Freudian Slit is offline
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Originally Posted by Susanann View Post
What does that have to do with anything?

That seems kind of a meaningless statistic.

73% of rapists are "friends or aquaintances"?????? - I think they mean: 73% are aquaintances because friends dont do that. According to the FBI's definition of aquaintance, the definition of attacker is "NOT" unknown.
Some friends do. Some women get raped by their husbands, boyfriends, relatives or people they thought cared about them.
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  #29  
Old 09-05-2009, 12:28 PM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Originally Posted by Freudian Slit View Post
Some friends do. Some women get raped by their husbands, boyfriends, relatives or people they thought cared about them.

Regardless, nobody keeps statistics that give us numbers/differentiate between husband, boyfriend, former husband, former boyfriend, relative, former relative, friend, former friend, etc ....versus just being able to provide a name or identify a mugg shot(i.e an aquaintance). The incidence of rape by a husband is probably pretty low, and the incidence of abduction/kidnapping by a husband - even lower than that.

Generally they are so rare,that when we hear of rape on the tv news, we usually dont think of the perpetrator as being her husband or live-in boyfriend, and I certainly dont see that on my tv news.
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  #30  
Old 09-05-2009, 12:30 PM
Freudian Slit Freudian Slit is offline
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Regardless, nobody keeps statistics that give us numbers/differentiate between husband, boyfriend, former husband, former boyfriend, relative, former relative, friend, former friend, etc ....versus just being able to provide a name or identify a mugg shot(i.e an aquaintance). The incidence of rape by a husband is probably pretty low, and the incidence of abduction/kidnapping by a husband - even lower than that.

Generally they are so rare,that when we hear of rape on the tv news, we usually dont think of the perpetrator as being her husband or live-in boyfriend, and I certainly dont see that on my tv news.
Well, I wasn't talking about kidnapping--just rape.

Actually, it's the opposite--rape by a stranger (without the whole kidnapping/abduction) is fairly rare, whereas rape by someone you know (a date, a boyfriend, someone you thought was a friend) is very common. It probably doesn't show up on the news because it doesn't sound newsworthy or because it often doesn't get reported.
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  #31  
Old 09-05-2009, 12:56 PM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Originally Posted by Freudian Slit View Post


Actually, it's the opposite--rape by a stranger (without the whole kidnapping/abduction) is fairly rare, whereas rape by someone you know (a date, a boyfriend, someone you thought was a friend) is very common. It probably doesn't show up on the news because it doesn't sound newsworthy or because it often doesn't get reported.

Cite?

Thats just not true, and according to police reports, the field: "someone you know", usually does NOT!!!!! mean boyfriend, date, husband, or friend.

I would guess that most rapes were done by people a woman would not choose to have sex with and to say otherwise is spreading a very misleading rumor. It doesnt have to be a stranger, it can be someone you know, or "know of" who is disgusting.

Being a non-stranger doesnt mean anything. You seem to be hung up on stranger or non-stranger. Most women would not have sex with 99.99 % of non-strangers, and most "non-strangers" are also not friends either. I know plenty of non-strangers and I dont like most of them for any purpose .
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  #32  
Old 09-05-2009, 01:18 PM
Eats_Crayons Eats_Crayons is offline
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The incidence of rape by a husband is probably pretty low,
Actually in a a 1990 study 10% of married women reported a forced sexual assault, and studies of women in battered women's shelters show that a significant number have been raped by their husbands/boyfriends.

In the United States, according to Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Justice, 1994, 28% of rape victims are raped by husbands/boyfriends. The same stats say 68% knew their attackers (date rape, acquaintance rape). Approximatley 5% were raped by other relatives.

Comparable stats National Crime Victims Survey (1992-1993): 92% of rapes were committed by known assailants with roughly half committed by friends and acquaintances, 26% by intimate partners.
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  #33  
Old 09-05-2009, 01:55 PM
Susanann Susanann is offline
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Actually in a a 1990 study 10% of married women reported a forced sexual assault, and studies of women in battered women's shelters show that a significant number have been raped by their husbands/boyfriends.

In the United States, according to Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Dept. of Justice, 1994, 28% of rape victims are raped by husbands/boyfriends. The same stats say 68% knew their attackers (date rape, acquaintance rape). Approximatley 5% were raped by other relatives.

Comparable stats National Crime Victims Survey (1992-1993): 92% of rapes were committed by known assailants with roughly half committed by friends and acquaintances, 26% by intimate partners.

.............what is its utterly amazing to me, is that I am... THE ONLY PERSON !!!!!!! on Straight Dope who has never known a single woman who was raped by her current boyfriend or her current husband, but more to the point and back to the Topic, I have never known a single woman actually abducted/kidnapped by her current husband or current boyfriend.






(also, FYI..................dont know either any men raped or kidnapped by their wives or girlfriends)

Last edited by Susanann; 09-05-2009 at 01:59 PM..
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  #34  
Old 09-05-2009, 02:07 PM
Eats_Crayons Eats_Crayons is offline
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.............what is its utterly amazing to me, is that I am... THE ONLY PERSON !!!!!!! on Straight Dope who has never known a single woman who was raped by her boyfriend or her husband.
Or maybe no one has offered you that information.

Edit: You have edit your last post. Yes, one would hope that woman would leave an abusive relationship.

Last edited by Eats_Crayons; 09-05-2009 at 02:10 PM..
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  #35  
Old 09-05-2009, 02:22 PM
Eats_Crayons Eats_Crayons is offline
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Also, "abduction", "unlawful confinement", "false imprisonment" and similar crimes are sadly not uncommon in domestic violence cases. Women do get abducted by their husbands/boyfriends (wherein the legal definition means you are forcibly taken an held captive against your will.)
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  #36  
Old 09-05-2009, 03:20 PM
Alan Smithee Alan Smithee is offline
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Originally Posted by Susanann View Post
.............what is its utterly amazing to me, is that I am... THE ONLY PERSON !!!!!!! on Straight Dope who has never known a single woman who was raped by her current boyfriend or her current husband, but more to the point and back to the Topic, I have never known a single woman actually abducted/kidnapped by her current husband or current boyfriend.






(also, FYI..................dont know either any men raped or kidnapped by their wives or girlfriends)
You will notice, however, that I didn't ask about whether anyone personally knows people who have been abducted or raped by partners, strangers, etc. I asked about statistics.

Thanks to all who have helped so far!
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  #37  
Old 09-05-2009, 03:52 PM
Jragon Jragon is offline
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It's difficult to find statistics for this, the Uniform Crime Reports that a lot of stats come from don't include kidnapping because, well, let's ask the FBI:
Quote:
Originally Posted by FBI UCR FAQ
Which specific crimes are reported to the UCR Program, and why were these crimes identified for reporting?
The UCR Program collects offense information for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. These are Part I offenses and are serious crimes by nature and/or volume. Not all crimes, such as embezzlement, are readily brought to the attention of the police. Also, some serious crimes, such as kidnapping, occur infrequently. Therefore, the UCR Program limits the reporting of offenses known to the eight selected crime classifications because they are the crimes most likely to be reported and most likely to occur with sufficient frequency to provide an adequate basis for comparison.
Arson was not originally part of the crime reporting process. Arson became the eighth Part I crime as the result of a limited congressional mandate in October 1978. With the passage of the Anti-Arson Act of 1982, Congress permanently designated arson as a reportable offense.
As for arrest information, the UCR Program collects arrest data on Part I offenses and 21 other crimes, such as driving under the influence, that are Part II offenses. Simple assault is a Part II offense but is collected under 4e (Other Assaults–Simple, Not Aggravated) as a quality control matter and for the purpose of looking at total assault violence.
There are a few reports on child abductions, and the FBI has tons of pages on "famous kidnappings," but between the DoJ, FBI, and CIA I can't find any hard statistics, other than the missing persons registry which tends to even count people who flew out to the Bahamas and forgot to tell their family.
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  #38  
Old 09-05-2009, 03:59 PM
Jragon Jragon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jragon View Post
It's difficult to find statistics for this, the Uniform Crime Reports that a lot of stats come from don't include kidnapping because, well, let's ask the FBI:


There are a few reports on child abductions, and the FBI has tons of pages on "famous kidnappings," but between the DoJ, FBI, and CIA I can't find any hard statistics, other than the missing persons registry which tends to even count people who flew out to the Bahamas and forgot to tell their family.
I should also mention that the DoJ's Nation Crime Victimization Survey, which attempts to also address unreported crimes isn't much better here.
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  #39  
Old 09-05-2009, 04:36 PM
Eats_Crayons Eats_Crayons is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smithee View Post
You will notice, however, that I didn't ask about whether anyone personally knows people who have been abducted or raped by partners, strangers, etc. I asked about statistics.
A lot seem to be listed under violence against women stats which include "hostage-taking" and "abduction". Abductions statistics are tougher to sort out, because for adults, they seem to be linked with other crimes like car-jacking, robbery, and murder.

Looking up "missing people" stats is a bit more helpful. National Crime Information Center says in 2007 there were 11,670 adults (21 or older) listed as EMI (missing under circumstances that suggest involuntary disappearance such as abduction) and that is out of a total of 139,510 missing people (21 or older). I can't find anything on how many EMIs were female.

A separate entry has: "518 records entered as Abducted by a Stranger". It does not say if the "abducted by stranger" records were for adults or juveniles, male or female, or all of the above.
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  #40  
Old 09-06-2009, 03:48 PM
I Love Me, Vol. I I Love Me, Vol. I is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Great Philosopher View Post
Also, just to point out, being worried about your daughters traveling alone wouldn't just be fear of abduction, it would be of any of the other horrible things that could happen as well: rape and sexual assault wouldn't be counted in those abduction figures for instance, and sadly they're probably both a lot more likely to happen.
And Robots! Also, the Plague, vats of rubber cement spilling from upper-story windows suffocating you instantly, spontaneous combustion, and of course, St. Vitus' Dance.

It's tough being a woman. I'm sure glad I have my magical protective penis! But really-- so good of you to point out all of the horrible things that can happen to women. I mean, let's be realistic here, if you are a woman in America, sooner or later you are going to be raped and chopped into tiny pieces, or, a victim of St. Vitus's Dance. Be afraid... be VERY, VERY afraid!!!!!

Are you Nancy Grace by any chance?
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  #41  
Old 09-06-2009, 04:10 PM
Xema Xema is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eats_Crayons View Post
Also, "abduction", "unlawful confinement", "false imprisonment" and similar crimes are sadly not uncommon in domestic violence cases. Women do get abducted by their husbands/boyfriends (wherein the legal definition means you are forcibly taken an held captive against your will.)
In many places these terms are applied when someone is prevented from moving about as they please. This is by no means a good thing, but it is often rather different from what the word "abduction" conjures up in most minds.
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  #42  
Old 09-06-2009, 04:30 PM
CC CC is offline
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I'm also wondering about statistics on women who report being raped or assaulted by their husbands. I can imagine questions on a survey that say, "Have you ever had sex with your husband after telling him that you did not want to?" or "Has your husband ever insisted that you have sex with him?" Or a question that tries to determine that the husband initiated the sex against the desires of the wife. That such a description can apply to rape as well as a perfectly safe and healthy negotiation between marrieds makes me wonder about a lot of the statistics that are used in these discussions. Depending upon who's asking, there could be a wide discrepancy in the interpretation of the results.
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  #43  
Old 09-06-2009, 09:24 PM
even sven even sven is online now
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Like most rape surveys, it probably probably says "has your husband ever used force or the threat of force to have sex with you against your will?" Hardly part of a normal or healthy marriage.
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