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  #1  
Old 12-15-2009, 03:58 PM
Teaira Teaira is offline
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Does life after college suck?

I am curious. I don't like college much and haven't been having a good experience (mostly because of all the financial stress-- no parents or real support system + terrible depression). If life after college is worse, I think I am going to opt out.

Anyway, I'd like to hear some experiences about life after graduation. Was the real world like you thought it would be? How did you adjust? All stories welcome.
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  #2  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:04 PM
otternell otternell is offline
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College and the working world are very different. Just because you don't like one doesn't really mean that you won't like the other.

More importantly, is there any way you can seek counseling? If you are terribly depressed and are thinking about opting out, you truly need to talk with someone. Please at least call 1-800-442-HOPE.
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  #3  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:05 PM
Cat Fight Cat Fight is offline
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Life after college only sucks if that's where you peaked. Which is sort of sad. I think a lot of college students go through some depression, a mix of their experience not living up to Hollywood's depiction of university as a booze-soaked orgy of fun and the looming future and all the crap that supposedly comes with it (finding a job, paying off loans, growing up, settling down). I had fun times in college but not a one had anything to do with the actual schools I went to or my fellow students. I never lived on campus and I never spent more time there than I had to. I'm still young, but it was a blip. I did well, but I'm much happier getting paid for all this stress.
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  #4  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:08 PM
begbert2 begbert2 is offline
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It would depend hugely on factors like your job and your social life and your romantic/family life. There's no way to make a base prediction without that sort of information.
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  #5  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:10 PM
Oakminster Oakminster is offline
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Depends. In college, I had no money but very little responsibility and virtually no authority. 20-some odd years later, I can afford a few luxuries, but I have tons of responsibility, plenty of authority, and lots of stress to go with it. To a certain extent, college was more fun, but the real world is more comfortable.

On the other hand, I command a lot more respect now than I did as a college kid. Nobody takes college kids seriously. Now, I'm starting to gain a bit of publicity in certain quarters, becoming somewhat known in my field, I've established a reputation, and people take me very seriously when I so intend.
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  #6  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:11 PM
Anne Neville Anne Neville is offline
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Originally Posted by Teaira View Post
Anyway, I'd like to hear some experiences about life after graduation. Was the real world like you thought it would be?
It really isn't as bad as I thought it would be. I've been able to find jobs where I don't have to wear suits or dresses to work and don't have to sell anything or be any good at schmoozing. The hours are certainly much better- I only work 40 hours a week now, and I worked much more when I was in school (though I admit I may not be typical that way). I have more money now, and that's nice. It's not less stressful than being in school now, but it usually is. I'm a better cook than the dining hall was, though it does sometimes suck to have to make dinner every night.

YMMV, of course.
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  #7  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:16 PM
Hilarity N. Suze Hilarity N. Suze is offline
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I had a blast in college but there is a LOT of life, i.e., most of it, after college. And most of it a lot more fun than college, frankly.

Although working can be a drag.

Now it could depend on your definition of fun. For me, getting drunk/getting high and partying down began to wear kinda thin within a couple of years after college, although I never stopped dancing. (Well, you know, I don't do it 24/7 or anything.) But then I also always felt I had to earn my partying--then by studying, later by working.

Nothing was exactly like I thought it would be. Some things better, others worse.

Last edited by Hilarity N. Suze; 12-15-2009 at 04:17 PM..
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  #8  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:23 PM
RandMcnally RandMcnally is offline
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I'm going to say no. I'm in college right now, but I'm a returning student. I went military right after high school for four years and now I'm a full-time student.

I, for one, hate college and I cannot wait until it is over.
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  #9  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:30 PM
Oredigger77 Oredigger77 is offline
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I hated college I was broke most of the time and could barely afford food so I never got to pay for things to brighten up a day. My class load sucked and even when I got home at the end of the day I still had homework and studying.

Now I'm working and make good money so I can afford to eat out or buy myself little things. When I get off work I'm on call but carrying a second cell phone isn't a big imposition so in general I don't have to think about work when I'm not there. I'm having a lot more fun now then when I was in college and pretty close to when I was in high school.

I'm planning on going back to college though. I don't like what I do when I'm working and I can only work in places that I don't like. This time I'm going to have money when I go back I'm planning on about 200k in savings to put me through so I think college will be better. When I think back to being in class for 5 hours a day and doing another 3 hours of homework every day it's really easier then work in terms of hours. I believe that this time through school it will be better then my current working life but not as good as my future working life.

Think about what you hate about college and try to find a job that removes that from your life. If you hate being a poor student who can't afford to have fun make sure you get a job that makes money. If you hate the time spend away from class time studying where it feel like school is your entire life pick a job that has defined hours and no work when you're away from work. Any way you look at it work like is completely different then school whether it's better or worse depends on what you hate about school and what job you pick.
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  #10  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:30 PM
Algher Algher is offline
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OK - I loved college, I admit. I personally felt that the peak of hedonism is Sophomore year, when I was no longer a stupid Freshman, but the pain of my debt and need for a job was still out on the horizon.

Eventually I graduated with 10s of thousands of debt, a used car, and no job. I also had no family support.

Once I got that first decent professional job, I found that working could be even better! I had income, my debt was manageable, and I could buy random stuff. Going to a pub was easy, and I could even afford to buy a round or three. There is great freedom once you are picking up a paycheck of your own, based on the educational status you are achieving.

Here is a random thought - head down to the campus career center and see what sorts of jobs might be available to you once your graduate. Go to salary.com (or other sites) and figure out how much you might be making soon after you get your sheepskin. Make that your goal so that you know that all of the debt and hard work has a fiscal goal.

Or don't - I am not a therapist, nor do I play one on TV.

Last edited by Algher; 12-15-2009 at 04:31 PM..
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  #11  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:34 PM
joebuck20 joebuck20 is offline
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I went through, I wouldn't call it depression by any means, but a period of feeling blue after college that had a lot to do with missing my friends and not partying on the weekends anymore, as well as no longer having the positions of authority I did in the various school organizations I was a member of.
But a lot of posters here are correct in that you get over those feelings pretty quick as you make new friends and establish yourself in your career.

Last edited by joebuck20; 12-15-2009 at 04:37 PM..
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  #12  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:36 PM
Harriet the Spry Harriet the Spry is offline
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If you are depressed, life will always suck, even if your life is objectively awesome. College usually has some free, convenient counseling available, and I encourage you to seek it out. That may not be as readily available after college.

Although I enjoyed college, I was definitely ready to take a big break from it when I was done. I enjoyed just having the real freedom to do what I wanted to in my free time, by moving to a new area where I didn't really know people and exploring what interested me, not what other people would see as cool. Of course, while doing those things, I coincidentally met people who thought those things were cool.

Also, while life was frugal at the beginning, I was always able to pay my bills and enjoy a slightly higher standard of living than I did in college.
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  #13  
Old 12-15-2009, 04:36 PM
Beadalin Beadalin is offline
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College was fun, but holy shit, I like real life a TON better.

I like being paid for the work I do. I like having a clear end to the workday, no homework, no weekend studying. I like not needing to ask my parents for money, because I am making my own. I like having varied social circles, especially because I'm genuinely friends with people decades older and decades younger than me. I like being free of the rumor mills and constant high drama that college-aged people soak in.

I like who I am much more than I did in college. I'm 34, and it's amazing how much I've grown and forgiven myself for in those intervening 12 years.

Anyway, I have never and will never buy into the notion that the "best years of your life" are the ones where you're in school. That's unmitigated bullshit. The best years of your life are the ones where you're doing what you choose to do, with people you choose to be with, and set goals that are right for you.
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  #14  
Old 12-15-2009, 05:34 PM
Hedda Rosa Hedda Rosa is offline
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The best part of not being in college is no homework! Well, now that I have gotten further along in my field I do need to work on projects nights and weekends sometimes but I enjoy my work - it isn't like writing a 20 page paper just to fulfil a requirement.

The independance of being in your early to mid 20s, with a job but no major responsabilities is much much more fun than college, in my experience. I'd be 25 again in a heartbeat. Making some money, able to travel and go to events but no one really counting on you to do anything.

Life gets more complicated as you go along, what with mortgages and kids (you can opt out of that stuff though!)

College was fun, but it wasn't real.
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  #15  
Old 12-15-2009, 08:55 PM
groo groo is offline
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College was a soul-crushing experience for me, and I graduated with virtually no self-confidence, convinced that I would never work in any field related to my degree. Then I got a job. All they wanted was 40 hours a week of my time, and they paid me a decent wage, and within a couple of years, I was living a million miles away from my horrible, horrible college existence.

So, hang in there.
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  #16  
Old 12-15-2009, 09:04 PM
Spice Weasel Spice Weasel is offline
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I was depressed as hell as an undergrad (I mean non-functional), took a two-year break, and came back happy. Now I'm in grad school, and it's like those first couple years of undergrad all over again... except I have the tools necessary to prevent my life from completely falling apart like it did then. Now I'm learning to be happy all over again.

Bottom line is, you have to heal yourself. If you have depression, it's not going to go away unless you do something about it. (I also had no parents or financial support, so was in a similar boat as you... I know that pain, and it sucks. I felt like a total freak. Sometimes, I still do.)

I'm sure if I hadn't just finished writing a 36-page paper I would be able to provide some more useful advice, but that's all I've got right now. Just hang on. It can get better. It can get wonderful.
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  #17  
Old 12-15-2009, 09:08 PM
even sven even sven is online now
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The first couple years out of college were difficult for me. It was a shock to suddenly be away from all the cushy "we care about you" things that students get- the student lounges, computer labs, gyms, recreational activities, etc. In college, you get a lot of positive feedback all the time. In real life, pretty much nobody cares. It was also difficult to get used to not being a "student." After being a student all your life, it's hard to imagine life as something else- especially if you have trouble finding a decent job. As a student, you have so many resources at your disposal just to help you reach your full potential. On your own, you are on your own.

But I've grown into it, and now I love living in the real world so much that the one thing I'm looking for most in grad schools is good internship opportunities. I like that I'm actually doing the things I used to read about. I like the flexibility- you can quite a job with much few consequences than leaving school. I like being able to travel and not being stuck on a school schedule. And, I've managed to still learn every day of my life even though I'm not in school. It's pretty rad.
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  #18  
Old 12-15-2009, 09:13 PM
Nocturne Nocturne is offline
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I loved college my first year. It started going downhill seriously in sophomore year. By the time I graduated, I was exhausted (working 2-3 jobs at a time probably didn't help that either...)

The next 2 years after the degree sucked mightily as well.

Then I somehow kicked myself out of depression (and several toxic people exited my life).

I love my working life now, and I plan to return for teaching certification in the fall and I'm terribly excited!
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  #19  
Old 12-15-2009, 09:16 PM
633squadron 633squadron is offline
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Originally Posted by Teaira View Post
I am curious.

Anyway, I'd like to hear some experiences about life after graduation. Was the real world like you thought it would be? How did you adjust? All stories welcome.
One word: money.

But parts of life suck anyway. Growing up sucks. Being in love sucks. Having a girlfriend/boyfriend sucks. Being married sucks. Having kids sucks. Having grandkids doesn't suck much, if you can survive that long.

The key qualifier here is not all the time! Nothing should suck all the time, ideally. So if you're finding that college universally sucks, don't count on after college universally making up for it. Go have some fun now. Drink cheap wine with good friends.
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  #20  
Old 12-15-2009, 09:17 PM
pbbth pbbth is offline
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College was good. I got to do a lot of things that I wouldn't have done otherwise and build a foundation for the rest of my life.

When I graduated college I got a job and a cheap apartment, saved up some money, and then asked myself, "What would make me happier than anything in the world?" Then I went and did that and I am incredibly happy pretty much all of the time. I no longer had to do what my parents said or what my professors said! I get to choose exactly what I want to do without answering to anyone else and it is incredible. And I know that if what I do or where I live or whatever stops making me happy I can do something else or go somewhere else. Being an adult is the most awesome thing ever.
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  #21  
Old 12-15-2009, 11:21 PM
Pyper Pyper is offline
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Post-college life is so much better. The freedom from all kinds of restrictions is what I enjoy most. I can live where I want, I can have my own place, sleep and wake on my own schedule, watch what I want on TV, cook what I want, buy my own furniture, have my own pets, and engage in the hobbies of my choice. I remember the intense satisfaction I got when arriving home at night to my first apartment after college. This is MY place, I rent it with MY money. It may just be the kind of person I am, but I cherish my independence more than anything.
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  #22  
Old 12-16-2009, 04:21 AM
Cyberhwk Cyberhwk is offline
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Originally Posted by Teaira View Post
I am curious. I don't like college much and haven't been having a good experience (mostly because of all the financial stress-- no parents or real support system + terrible depression). If life after college is worse, I think I am going to opt out.

Anyway, I'd like to hear some experiences about life after graduation. Was the real world like you thought it would be? How did you adjust? All stories welcome.
Ummmm...little of both. The problem is, what you gain in economic and financial freedom by being employed, you lose in leisure time. You finally have your own money and can do with it what you choose. Unfortunately, 10AM-2PM Monday-Thursday isn't considered "Full Time" anymore.

So it's a mixed bag. The transition is a bit weird. The idea that there's no real "next week" or "finals coming up" or "next semester." No. Now it's just, "go to work to do your job." Over and over, week after week.

The world was not what I thought it would be. I thought "I have a college degree now. I'll grab some job postings and choose my future career." Well...6 months later I started a course to deal cards in a casino because I finally just needed cash. 5 YEARS later, that's still my job. Took quite a while to adjust, partially because I led a pretty sheltered childhood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Fight View Post
I think a lot of college students go through some depression, a mix of their experience not living up to Hollywood's depiction of university as a booze-soaked orgy of fun and the looming future and all the crap that supposedly comes with it (finding a job, paying off loans, growing up, settling down).
I actually really agree with this. I lived a very sheltered childhood and had JUST started coming around when I graduated from college. I felt like I had just completely missed every opportunity I was ever going to have to have fun. That it was all downhill from there on out. Not only is that not the case, but the independence makes it even better.
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  #23  
Old 12-16-2009, 05:21 AM
Hallucinex Hallucinex is offline
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There'll be good and bad, but overall I think you'll like it. I'm a couple years out of uni now and things are good.

With a job you should have at least a little money you can actually use for enjoyable stuff rather than...say...just having enough to eat like a human. It's great now that I can see a show or concert is coming up, and know that I can most likely afford to go without too much worry.

And without assignments and essays etc, it's fantastic to have weekends and evenings where your time is actually your own - no worrying about the exam you should probably be studying for and whatnot.

Also, if you find a job opportunity you're interested in somewhere else (or just want to go live somewhere else) - you're free to pack your things and go give it a shot.
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  #24  
Old 12-16-2009, 05:50 AM
Pithy Moniker Pithy Moniker is offline
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I worked a part time job along with my college courses so I was constantly busy and constantly broke. My car was a piece of crap. Having no A/C and windows that won't roll down SUCKS in August in Alabama! In the rare moments of free time, it could be hard to enjoy myself because it always felt like there was an assignment I could be working on or something I should be studying.

Since college, I've been much happier. There are more responsibilities sure but the advantages they come with far outweigh the negatives.
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  #25  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:23 AM
Elysian Elysian is offline
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I loved college. Books, learning, sharing my writing, getting feedback on all that I did, having gobs of spare time...it was all lovely. However, it was a lot of work, and I usually had a part time job to go along with it as well, and usually a long distance relationship on top of that I had to maintain.

Now my relationship lives with me, I have only one job that actually pays me, and all of that free time I can do whatever I want. I don't have to study or feel guilty about not studying. As someone said above, I also get to choose everything. I live where I want, eat what I want, have pets if I want, and socialise whenever I want. The deliniation between work and free time is very sharp, not like it is in college.

Of course right now I am studying for something and I can't find a steady job (I'm temping, working about 20 hours a week average). Once I've taken my exams, however, and get a full time real job again, life will once again be golden.
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  #26  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:55 AM
Gus Gusterson Gus Gusterson is offline
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  #27  
Old 12-16-2009, 08:05 AM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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College was fun - but I enjoy my job and being a mom and wife more...
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  #28  
Old 12-16-2009, 08:40 AM
Hypno-Toad Hypno-Toad is offline
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My last year of college I worked part time as a bagger/cashier. After graduation, I just glided on in this job because it was so nice not having an responsibilities beyond putting in eight hours a day at work. It was rather pleasant.

This was detrimental in the long run. I consider those few post-college years to have been wasted.

Last edited by Hypno-Toad; 12-16-2009 at 08:41 AM.. Reason: Reason? You need a reason?
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  #29  
Old 12-16-2009, 08:52 AM
Dinsdale Dinsdale is offline
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Depends. In college, I had no money but very little responsibility and virtually no authority. 20-some odd years later, I can afford a few luxuries, but I have tons of responsibility, plenty of authority, and lots of stress to go with it. To a certain extent, college was more fun, but the real world is more comfortable.
Pretty much this (tho I have succeeded in structuring my work to have as little responsibility, authority, and stress as possible.) The big difference between college and real life is that the latter is REAL. Things really matter - and pay significant dividends over a vastly longer scale than the brief span of a 4-year (or so!) college career. Of course, if you are a fuck up, you might not enjoy the repercussions.

But all of the good times I had in college don't hold a candle to the satisfaction and enjoyment I've derived from having worked with my wife to raise 3 pretty neat young adults. Yeah, there is a lot of work and sacrifice involved in beginning a career, a serious relationship, starting a family, living within a budget ... But the payoffs are so much huger than anything you would get at college. And you realize how much you grow in so many ways after actually having lived a life, rather than just studying about one.

I would never have dreamt how great it would be now in my late-40s, with the kids all off to college, and my wife and I are getting to plan how we wish to style the next few decades of our lives. (Of course, I wouldn't mind having back that bullet-proof body I enjoyed as recently as 10-years ago!)
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  #30  
Old 12-16-2009, 09:16 AM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Originally Posted by Cat Fight View Post
I think a lot of college students go through some depression, a mix of their experience not living up to Hollywood's depiction of university as a booze-soaked orgy of fun and the looming future and all the crap that supposedly comes with it (finding a job, paying off loans, growing up, settling down).
My college experience was pretty much a Hollywood depiction of a booze-soaked orgy of fun. The chicks weren't as hot though.


Whether life after college "sucks" really depends on you. If college sucks for you, you should probably try to figure out what sucks about it. Chances are those things will still suck once you get out of college and might even be exacerbated by the fact that you are no longer in a rigidly structured college environment. Things that were awesome in college like having friends or a girlfriend or hobbies or whatever can actually be better once you have some money coming in and are supporting yourself.

Personally I have found that my life has continued to improve since college.
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  #31  
Old 12-16-2009, 09:32 AM
Freddy the Pig Freddy the Pig is offline
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In many ways, life after college does suck. You have to work on somebody else's schedule, getting up early and getting home late 240 days out of the year, rather than going to class for 15 hours and designing your own work schedule for the rest of the time. You start and end the day with a bitch of a commute instead of a 10-minute walk to class. Christmas vacation starts at noon on the 24th and ends at 8:00 a.m. on the 26th.

At work, unless you're very lucky or very senior, you have to work all day on what someone else thinks is important. There are no more electives.

Most of your co-workers will be much older, with families, and no interest in meeting people or making friends. You have to work a lot harder to find social activities with people you like, and a lot of the time you'll be too tired to do it.

But, you get paid. That makes all the difference.
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  #32  
Old 12-16-2009, 09:45 AM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Originally Posted by Freddy the Pig View Post
In many ways, life after college does suck. You have to work on somebody else's schedule, getting up early and getting home late 240 days out of the year, rather than going to class for 15 hours and designing your own work schedule for the rest of the time. You start and end the day with a bitch of a commute instead of a 10-minute walk to class. Christmas vacation starts at noon on the 24th and ends at 8:00 a.m. on the 26th.

At work, unless you're very lucky or very senior, you have to work all day on what someone else thinks is important. There are no more electives.

Most of your co-workers will be much older, with families, and no interest in meeting people or making friends. You have to work a lot harder to find social activities with people you like, and a lot of the time you'll be too tired to do it.

But, you get paid. That makes all the difference.

As I said, a lot of that depends on you. Did you just take any job or did you spend time trying to figure out a career you would enjoy? Do you live in the middle of nowhere or do you work in or near a major city with lots to do? Are you coworkers a bunch of bitter old losers or are they young, hip and ambitious?

My experience for several years after college was not materially different from college in may ways. Except my friends and I all had jobs and some money now. We all lived around the NYC area. During the summers we rented beach houses on the Jersey Shore (and no, we were not all a bunch of guidos like on the MTV show) and ski houses in the winter. Many of us worked in companies that hired a lot of new college grads.

As for work, I had to do a shitload of work in college. We constantly had to pull all nighters and do hours worth of homework and studying. At least now I get paid for it.

Also, I've worked at places like you describe as recently as last year and they suck (I'm 37 fwiw). It has nothing to do with people having familes or lives or whatever. It has to do with working with people who suck. I bet if I met those same people when they were 25 or 18 they would still suck.
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  #33  
Old 12-16-2009, 09:45 AM
Dangerosa Dangerosa is online now
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It can also depend on where you are at both times.

If your college is funded by scholarships, or Mom and Dad, or even loans with a distant due date you have the temperament to ignore and your coursework is interesting and fairly easy - and then you leave school to find out that your meal plan is no longer included in life, you graduate to a dried up job market, your loans come due, your apartment is crappy, you are overspending on your credit cards to be able to afford good shoes to interview in - life right after college SUCKS.

If you don't enjoy college life, have a lot of stress of working while trying to go to school, struggle with your coursework - then manage to transition into a fulfilling job you enjoy that provides adequately for your needs, post college life rocks.

The truth for most people is somewhere in the middle. College is not all joy - whether that joy is intellectual or booze soaked orgies. Parts of it are a drudge. Most of us go through college with some level of resource constraints limiting the amount of "fun" we can have. And post college is similar. Few of us get out to a job we LOVE where we can do anything we want, that pays us in such a way we can afford to do anything we want. Most of us get out and struggle with bills and relationships and jobs.
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  #34  
Old 12-16-2009, 10:06 AM
Khadaji Khadaji is offline
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Man in Black: Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.
OK, IMO there is an ebb and flow to life. Some good times and some bad times. You'll see more good times if you actively pursue them. This takes an effort though.
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  #35  
Old 12-16-2009, 10:15 AM
joebuck20 joebuck20 is offline
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Originally Posted by Freddy the Pig View Post
Most of your co-workers will be much older, with families, and no interest in meeting people or making friends. You have to work a lot harder to find social activities with people you like, and a lot of the time you'll be too tired to do it.
This was the probably the hardest thing for me to deal with after college. It's easy to make friends when you're living in a dorm with a bunch of unmarried guys who are pretty much all the same age as you, have a lot of energy and who leave their doors open all the time.
It's much harder in a work environment where a lot of people have families as well as their own established social circles and aren't really looking for new people to hang out with.

Last edited by joebuck20; 12-16-2009 at 10:18 AM..
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  #36  
Old 12-16-2009, 10:30 AM
Redwing Redwing is offline
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I didn't spend enough time in college to know how much it sucks. But life after, or at least beyond, college is certainly not total suck.

Really though, it's life. I've had days where everything has fallen into place and the simple of joy of being alive has been enough to take my breath away, and days where every thing flies apart and nothing I can do will lessen the horror or fill in the gaping loss; and I've even had them back to back. Usually though, life is what you make it, in college and out of it, the paths before you are always infinite, and choices you make are what matters, especially the choices you make about what matters to you.

Remember the words on the king's ring: "This too shall pass"
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  #37  
Old 12-16-2009, 10:57 AM
Xavier T. Nougat Xavier T. Nougat is offline
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Teaira, are you sure that money is really the cause of your troubles? I know that sounds like a foolish thing to say, but the truth is that handling money never becomes fun or easy, even for the wealthy. Even after you pay off your student loans and any other debts, you're still going to have to play a delicate balancing game in order to keep your finances in control and save up for retirement. So, if money is really the only thing bothering you, then no, it will not get any better after college.

I was miserable in college. I was studying to be a teacher. I didn't really like most of my classmates and my best friends were all off campus. Everything about studying just plain depressed me and I never looked forward to the next day. I spent all of my time thinking that what I was doing was basically pointless and having a lot of existentialist angst.

Then, a couple years after I had graduated, I said to myself, "Teaching kinda sucks." So I quit and found a new job. I now have better friends and more time for my hobbies. Life is amazing and I wouldn't want to go back to my college years under any circumstances.

Maybe the problem is that you haven't set a proper goal yet that really matches what you want. As others have advised, I suggest going to the Career Services office and seeing if they have any suggestions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beadalin View Post
Anyway, I have never and will never buy into the notion that the "best years of your life" are the ones where you're in school. That's unmitigated bullshit. The best years of your life are the ones where you're doing what you choose to do, with people you choose to be with, and set goals that are right for you.
This is the best way to sum it up.
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  #38  
Old 12-16-2009, 11:02 AM
ralph124c ralph124c is offline
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This IS depressing!

I mean, people ask if there is life after highschool!
Now college. I loved college-it was a great time, for learning and having fun.
But after 4 years, i was ready for something different.
Is there anything more pathetic that a 6-year "super senior"?
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  #39  
Old 12-16-2009, 01:42 PM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joebuck20
This was the probably the hardest thing for me to deal with after college. It's easy to make friends when you're living in a dorm with a bunch of unmarried guys who are pretty much all the same age as you, have a lot of energy and who leave their doors open all the time.
I found the biggest challenge was finding friends outside of work. I worked with alot of young people right out of school and we tended to work long hours. It's fine at first when you don't know anyone, but eventually you really do want to create a life that is somewhat separate from your job.

But these things don't necessarily make life "sucky" after college. They are simply normal changes and challenges that must be dealt with.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Xavier T. Nougat View Post
...but the truth is that handling money never becomes fun or easy, even for the wealthy.
I find it fun. But then again I work for a big accounting firm.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph124c
Is there anything more pathetic that a 6-year "super senior"?
A 30 year old "alumni advisor" living in your fraternity house Old School style.
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  #40  
Old 12-16-2009, 02:14 PM
pulykamell pulykamell is online now
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I far, far prefer my life after-college. While I would overall characterize my college experience as positive and life-changing, it also was some of the most difficult times of my life, even though I actually liked all my teachers and classmates. For the most part, my life has been easier and less stressful after college. But, then again, I'm now doing exactly what I want, when I want, and I have some money in my pocket so I could enjoy myself without worrying too much about every last penny. The one thing I do miss about college is some of the raw creative and intellectual energy and enthusiasm, which is why I tend to like to hang around parts of town like Hyde Park (University of Chicago) or Evanston (Northwestern.) But college itself? No thanks. I still have nightmares about not being able to graduate/flunking a test/etc.
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  #41  
Old 12-16-2009, 03:05 PM
Voyager Voyager is online now
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I may not be a good person to answer, because I liked college so much I hid out in grad school for a long time afterwards. When I finally finished, though, the best thing was that when I got out of work I was finished with it. (This was pre-Internet.) Going home without a homework assignment of dissertation chapter hanging over you was very pleasant. Finally having money was pretty nice also. I had gotten married in grad school, so social life was not an issue.

But it really depends on why someone doesn't like college, and the job they get. Plus, this is probably the worst time to be getting out of college in the last 50 years, at least.
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  #42  
Old 12-16-2009, 03:31 PM
joebuck20 joebuck20 is offline
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Originally Posted by msmith537 View Post
I found the biggest challenge was finding friends outside of work. I worked with alot of young people right out of school and we tended to work long hours. It's fine at first when you don't know anyone, but eventually you really do want to create a life that is somewhat separate from your job.
The place where I worked after college had mainly an older crowd (think mid-30s and above), and when I finally did make friends they were people in that age range who either happened to be single or a bit eclectic.
And I lived in an apartment complex that had a lot of turnover and where I never saw much of the neighbors anyway. For months I literally had no one to hang out with.

Last edited by joebuck20; 12-16-2009 at 03:32 PM..
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  #43  
Old 12-16-2009, 04:07 PM
Tess Trueheart Tess Trueheart is offline
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Originally Posted by ralph124c View Post
Is there anything more pathetic that a 6-year "super senior"?
I sure hope so, because I'll be one.
Year one: majored in journalism. didn't get into the actual intro classes til spring and hated them.
Year two: changed to music education. Also changed schools, so even some of my basics were no longer needed at the other school.
Year three (right now): withdrew in the fall for medical issues. Going back in January.

As the music problem has not been completed by any of the last five years' graduates in a 4-year time, and I transferred, I don't expect to buck the trend. One extra year for the major change, one extra for the huge courseload and the illness.

I was full IB in high school, too, so I'm not just screwing around now either.

Last edited by Tess Trueheart; 12-16-2009 at 04:08 PM..
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  #44  
Old 12-16-2009, 04:09 PM
Dahnlor Dahnlor is offline
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I had a rather mixed college experience. On the plus side, it was a time where I did so many things and went so many places that the rest of my life since would seem to be boring, and there are many cherished memories. I was lucky not to have serious financial issues, and I had a supportive family.

I also have never been more depressed than I was during those years.

Looking back, those should have been the best years of my life. Even without major financial problems, the stresses from assignments and social pressures were more than enough to trigger that figurative ugly black cloud over my head almost all the time.

I was prescribed Prozac after about two years into college (it was all the rage at the time), and while I ultimately did not like how it affected me, it was effective in keeping my mood in check, and I ultimately learned how to separate my rational throughts from the negatives.

I stopped taking Prozac before I graduated, and I went essentially unmedicated for over 15 years, until recently. It was during this time that I went through most of my worst financial problems, and I was under-employed for quite some time, but even with all that, life in general was better.

If you're not seeing a therapist for your depression or using any anti-depressants, I strongly recommend that you do. Even going once every few months to maintain a prescription is a lot better than nothing.

Just remember, depression is a disease, and it needs to be treated as such. Whenever it hits, make it a point to remind yourself of that.
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  #45  
Old 12-16-2009, 05:22 PM
mack mack is offline
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I went to school in Boulder, CO and enjoyed my time at the University but also enjoyed the town and the surrounding countryside immensely, along with my friends. After graduation we all stayed in town for a few years but gradually peeled off to pursue whatever it was we were pursuing. I worked crap jobs during that time and was poor but I was single, had a roof over my head, and good friends so it was ok. I enjoyed the company of a lady friend from time to time but never really had a serious girlfriend, and I pined for a lass but it went unrequited.

I took big bike and Colorado river rafting trips that weren't very expensive but were awesome. After 3 years of knocking about like that I went to the big city to seek my fortune which ended up working out well. My friends are all scattered to the four winds, though, and while we keep in touch, I miss them. I've not been able to make such close friends since back in those days.

So, on the employment/financial/dating front, yeah, the first few years did suck, but they did serve to get me off my ass. From a lifestyle, hiking, biking, outdoorsy, hanging out with friends standpoint the first few years were quite nice. A mixed bag, IOW.
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  #46  
Old 12-16-2009, 06:55 PM
Super Kapowzler Super Kapowzler is offline
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I loved college. That's why it took me 6 years.
College was filled with chicks that, for most, were not in a "click", like they were in high school, (although not all.)
There are girls whose sole reason for going to school was to meet a mate.
I could walk up to the prettiest girl and start a conversation about a class we shared.
College was like...high school reinvented, in a way, more of "how it should be".
I knew so many people by name. I had so many friends. I was never alone.
My senior-year, I could not wait to be done, because I thought the world was my pearl.
After school, I moved to a city where I knew nary a soul, and it was a very, very lonely time.
To meet a girl, in a strange city, while working a revolving-schedule, is impossible.
I landed a job as management in a union shop, and was warned about making friends with the union-people, because it could cloud my judgement. How nice, new town, new people, don't make friends with them or you're out the door. I made friends, because I was alone, and was soon out the door. Nice.

The best things I learned in college were about being broke. They are important life-lessons.

Stay in college as long as you can. The "world" is like it was 20 years ago, but worse, and 20 years ago, the world sucked.
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  #47  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:31 PM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
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I did not like college much, but I really got into work whilst in college and then dropped out and worked full time, and now I'm working as a freelancer.

Keep in mind that the above is a summary of nearly 15 years. I've had lots of ups and downs and if I'm honest, the most important rule I've learned in all of this is that you have to look your mistakes in the face, apologize more than you probably want, but most of all make sure that your goal is what you actually want to reach - and don't think your goal won't change, because it will.
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  #48  
Old 12-16-2009, 07:46 PM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
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But if you follow that, and you're a bit smart, you'll probably do fine in the long run, no matter if you stay in college or quit. College is really for people who already really know what they want and need the education, or for people who don't have a clue, and just want a general education.

If you're in group 2, and in the US (where education is bloody expensive), I probably would suggest you take a break. Do some "stupid" job for while in an area you like and see if it's really all that. If it is, go back to college and study something relevant to that. If not, try something else. Repeat.
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  #49  
Old 12-16-2009, 08:14 PM
msmith537 msmith537 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joebuck20 View Post
The place where I worked after college had mainly an older crowd (think mid-30s and above), and when I finally did make friends they were people in that age range who either happened to be single or a bit eclectic.
And I lived in an apartment complex that had a lot of turnover and where I never saw much of the neighbors anyway. For months I literally had no one to hang out with.
Yeah, that's a problem for a lot of people. And it's compounded by the fact that people in their 20s tend to be somewhat transient - constantly moving and changing jobs and whatnot. You really have to force yourself to go out and do stuff by yourself (which often sucks) otherwise you can litterally spend an entire weekend not talking to another human being.
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  #50  
Old 12-16-2009, 08:43 PM
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gus Gusterson View Post
Mathilda: Is life always this hard, or is it just when you're a kid?

Leon: Always like this.
Excellent quote!

For me, college was mostly fun. I was poor, worked 2-3 jobs (work-study and at least 2 part-time jobs) to pay the bills, had no car, etc. I also had a fairly large group of friends so there was always someone to do things with, and we partied pretty hard (I won an award for it my 3rd year at FSU). I spent most of my time goofing off, to be honest, and maintained a 3.2 GPA.

Once I quit school (after about 5 years) I started working in my current profession. I have no steady employer but am far from poor and have a couple of vehicles. I have a smaller group of friends, and still party pretty hard. I still spend most of my time goofing off, to be honest, and couldn't be happier most of the time: I mean, I'm living my dream!

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