The Straight Dope

Go Back   Straight Dope Message Board > Main > In My Humble Opinion (IMHO)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-24-2012, 02:17 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
Stuttering and finding a job

What are the suitable jobs for someone who stutters?
Is it definitely a disadvantage when trying to get a job?
Reply With Quote
Advertisements  
  #2  
Old 11-24-2012, 02:32 PM
Duckster Duckster is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 12,883
In positions with a lot of verbal communications, it can be seen that way.

OTOH, stuttering is a disability protected under ADA.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-24-2012, 02:45 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckster View Post
OTOH, stuttering is a disability protected under ADA.
Thank you

Is it protected under law in every country? Which countries have this kind of law? How can I check it?

Moreover, employer doesn't have have to tell you that he refuse to employ you because you are stutterer. He can lie.* It seems to me, this law is useless.

* I am not criticizing or judging the employer by the way. This is human nature.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-24-2012, 02:52 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,808
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
What are the suitable jobs for someone who stutters?
Film, stage, and voice actor

Singer


Chairman and chief executive officer of the world's largest company


My father and brother are both stutterers. My father was a teacher for 30 years. My brother is a lawyer.

Last edited by Acsenray; 11-24-2012 at 02:54 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-24-2012, 02:55 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post

My father and brother are both stutterers. My father was a teacher for 30 years. My brother is a lawyer.
I guess they have minor problems with stuttering. Otherwise could they be a lawyer or a teacher? I don't think so.

Last edited by taskmgr.exe; 11-24-2012 at 02:55 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:03 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,808
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
I guess they have minor problems with stuttering. Otherwise could they be a lawyer or a teacher? I don't think so.
No, they are not minor problems. But they found ways to deal with the stuttering while performing their jobs well.

Are you a stutterer? Have you sought any kind of counseling or therapy?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:08 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
As far as I can tell from youtube videos, these people have really minor problems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
Are you a stutterer? Have you sought any kind of counseling or therapy?
Yes, of course. But they are of little help. Plus I was told by doctors there was no exact cure for this disability.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:19 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,808
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
As far as I can tell from youtube videos, these people have really minor problems.
You can't tell from YouTube videos.

Quote:
Yes, of course. But they are of little help. Plus I was told by doctors there was no exact cure for this disability.
I don't know of any cure either, but there is no such thing as a list of "jobs suitable for stutterers."

How old are you?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:25 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
You can't tell from YouTube videos.
Why?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
there is no such thing as a list of "jobs suitable for stutterers."
Why? When I said suitable, it meant that employer wouldn't really care about someone's stuttering. For example being a dishwasher wouldn't much pose problems for the stutterer in his work area.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
How old are you?
19. Why are you asking?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:29 PM
Duckster Duckster is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 12,883
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
Is it protected under law in every country? Which countries have this kind of law? How can I check it?
Try a search engine. Really. I bet you find a very, very short list.

Quote:
Moreover, employer doesn't have have to tell you that he refuse to employ you because you are stutterer. He can lie.* It seems to me, this law is useless.
Based on that approach, why have any law to treat people fairly? If exquisite elocution is not the predominant requirement of the job (air traffic controller, auctioneer, play by play announcer, etc.) it falls to the aggrieved to do their research and determine if a complaint or lawsuit under unlawful discrimination is worth the effort. You be surprised just how stupid potential employers can be, let alone current employers when it comes to unlawful discrimination.

Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
19. Why are you asking?
Because your inexperience and naivete are relevant.

Last edited by Duckster; 11-24-2012 at 03:32 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:29 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,808
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
Why?
Because even people with serious stuttering problems don't necessarily stutter when they're on camera.

Quote:
Why? When I said suitable, it meant that employer wouldn't really care about someone's stuttering. For example being a dishwasher wouldn't much pose problems for the stutterer in his work area.
Because even for a dishwasher any given employer might care. Discrimination isn't based on rationality. And even in jobs in which you assume that an employer would care, any given employer might not.

Quote:
19. Why are you asking?
Because it is relevant to who you are, what your experiences might be, what leads you to ask the question in the way you have.

Have you finished high school? Are you in college? What are your professional, academic, and other interests? Have you ever applied for a job or interacted with potential employers?

Last edited by Acsenray; 11-24-2012 at 03:29 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:52 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
Because even people with serious stuttering problems don't necessarily stutter when they're on camera.
Perhaps, you are right. But, I doubt anyone with heavy/major stuttering problem could hide it in front of camera, or could find a way so that he doesn't seem to have problem with stuttering at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acsenray View Post
Have you finished high school? Are you in college? What are your professional, academic, and other interests? Have you ever applied for a job or interacted with potential employers?
I have finished high school. I was in a college, but after some time, I flunked out of the college. I'll be in another college again soon. The reason that I ask this is I wonder if it'll pose any problems to me in future. And, I thought I could get some info concerning the toughness degree of problems which I may encounter.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:59 PM
Spice Weasel Spice Weasel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Well, I don't know what your particular skills are, but I once had a Masters-level coworker who did data analysis. He didn't stutter, but he had a pretty serious disability that made him unable to talk clearly. He moaned and grunted a lot. He had to write everything down. And he couldn't use one hand so he often had to type with his nose.

So people do get hired. I think you'd probably have good luck with non-profits, they tend to want to diversify their employee base so they might even see this difference as a plus.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 11-24-2012, 04:05 PM
Duckster Duckster is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 12,883
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
Perhaps, you are right. But, I doubt anyone with heavy/major stuttering problem could hide it in front of camera, or could find a way so that he doesn't seem to have problem with stuttering at all.
Look up Mel Tillis.

Quote:
I have finished high school. I was in a college, but after some time, I flunked out of the college. I'll be in another college again soon. The reason that I ask this is I wonder if it'll pose any problems to me in future. And, I thought I could get some info concerning the toughness degree of problems which I may encounter.
Seems to me there are two issues you need to address:
  • Your stuttering (what it is and degree of affliction)
  • Whether you control your stuttering or it controls you (self-esteem)
The degree of self-confidence you have as a person, how you interact with people, and how you "manage" your stuttering will determine your own success. There will always be assholes who will judge your stuttering as judging you. Some of those assholes will be (potential | actual) employers. Don't lower yourself to their level.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 11-24-2012, 04:11 PM
NGC2024 NGC2024 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
I had a college professor at a well respected liberal arts college who had a severe stutter. He was an exceptional educator.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-24-2012, 04:31 PM
FloatyGimpy FloatyGimpy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
I know someone with a stutter who is the speech writer for the Alberta Premier. Super nice guy to deal with.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-24-2012, 04:45 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,808
What are you good at? What skills, knowledge, etc., do you think you have enough ability and motivation to acquire? Those are the questions to answer. There are stutterers in every profession and trade.

Just do a simple search for famous stutterers — Look at lists like these — http://www.stutteringhelp.org/famous-people-who-stutter

The key is to become good at something. Stop looking at yourself from the point of view that you are a stutterer and you have to find a profession or trade that doesn't care if you stutter. If you are good at something, people won't care.

My dad had such bad eyesight and such a bad stutterer that his father kept him out of school until he was 15. His entire primary and secondary education was through home schooling. His parents thought he probably would never learn to read and considered sending him to be trained as a confectioner.

He got into one of the best colleges in India and subsequently got scholarships to world-class universities thousands of miles away in Europe and America. He intentionally went into teaching, knowing that every single day of his life he would have to stand up in front of a class and find a way to talk to them.

So, the question is not what jobs are available for stutterers. It's a question of what are you prepared to do in order to get a job that you want.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-24-2012, 05:05 PM
Arrendajo Arrendajo is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2010
I know a real estate broker who has a significant stutter. Interestingly, he is also an auctioneer. When he's calling an auction, he either doesn't stutter or the stutter blends seamlessly into the patter, I can't tell. He's a good auctioneer, though.
The vintner who sold us wine for our wedding has the worst stutter I've ever heard. He makes excellent wine and sold us cases of it for our wedding, so I don't think it was holding him back professionally, and we enjoyed working with him.
The most significant obstacle in your way, IMHO, will be your attitude, not your stutter.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11-24-2012, 05:48 PM
wheresmymind wheresmymind is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrendajo View Post
The most significant obstacle in your way, IMHO, will be your attitude, not your stutter.
This. Of all the people I've known who stuttered, the biggest factor in how normal or successful their life was wasn't how severe or mild their stutter was, but how rather how they dealt with it. One thing I noticed with all of them: it's very common for someone to be uncomfortable or embarrassed when first meeting a stutterer. They were very good at using a little bit of humor to break the embarrassment and put the person at ease.

Friends of mind were married by a priest with a fairly severe stutter. He would be fine when reading a book or singing, but anything from memory was pretty bad. He started his homily with "don't worry folks, I promise you this shouldn't take more than three or four hours." The tension in the room dropped, and by the end of the service it was almost unnoticeable. People are willing to ignore a lot from people who make them laugh or feel good.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11-24-2012, 09:54 PM
Silvorange Silvorange is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Have you tried speech therapy with a therapist who has experience dealing with stuttering?
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11-24-2012, 09:56 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silvorange View Post
Have you tried speech therapy with a therapist who has experience dealing with stuttering?
No. What could be the difference?
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11-24-2012, 10:04 PM
nikonikosuru nikonikosuru is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
No. What could be the difference?
Really? REALLY??? You're asking if there's a difference between a speech therapist who may have a basic grasp on stuttering compared to a seasoned one who has focused countless of years on it?

Not enough in the world for you.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11-24-2012, 10:05 PM
Silvorange Silvorange is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
No. What could be the difference?
I Googled "stuttering speech therapy" and found this site:
http://www.stutteringhelp.org/why-go-speech-therapy

I was interested to learn that not all speech therapists are comfortable working with stuttering. The ones who are more experienced with it can help with communication skills in general.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11-24-2012, 10:15 PM
taskmgr.exe taskmgr.exe is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 202
@Silvorange, thank you for the info.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nikonikosuru View Post
Really? REALLY??? You're asking if there's a difference between a speech therapist who may have a basic grasp on stuttering compared to a seasoned one who has focused countless of years on it?

Not enough in the world for you.
I can imagine the difference. I am just wondering if it's really helpful. Because, as you may know, there is no cure for it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nikonikosuru View Post
Not enough in the world for you.
You're right. I am an idiot.

Last edited by taskmgr.exe; 11-24-2012 at 10:15 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 11-24-2012, 10:20 PM
Acsenray Acsenray is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 26,808
There aren't "cures" for a lot of things. That doesn't mean that there isn't anyone who can help you figure out how to address those things in your life.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 11-24-2012, 11:49 PM
SpoilerVirgin SpoilerVirgin is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Obama Country
Posts: 4,713
You know, I was going to say that any job working with computers that doesn't involve a lot of verbal interaction would be appropriate for a stutterer. Then I remembered the most severe stutterer I ever knew. He was in a small seminar class that I took in college (one with a dozen people sitting around a table). It would sometimes take him several minutes to get a single sentence out. I decided to Google him, and it turns out that he is now a partner in a software firm that does development and has a proprietary programming system.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 11-25-2012, 12:20 AM
MeanOldLady MeanOldLady is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
I can imagine the difference. I am just wondering if it's really helpful. Because, as you may know, there is no cure for it.
My brother had a horrible stutter when we were kiddos. I mean so bad that he'd at times repeat the same sound 5-10 times. Seriously, t-t-t-t-t-talking to him s-s-s-s-s-some-t-t-times was like th-th-th-this. It wasn't always that bad, or else he'd have been incapable of having a conversation, but it could get pretty horrible. Went to a speech therapist, et voila. Perhaps "voila" might be the wrong term; it wasn't magical, and it took years for him to get it under wraps, but it did work. These days he barely has a stutter at all. There is some very occasional light stuttering that you wouldn't think anything of unless you knew about his stuttering problem. You would never be able to guess by the way he speaks now that he has such a sever stutter once.

Of course, your experience will depend on a lot of factors, and I don't know if this kind of thing gets harder to correct with age (maybe someone more knowledgeable or more willing to Google can say), but I do know that speech therapy for some can and does work.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 11-25-2012, 12:33 AM
Sinisterniik Sinisterniik is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
I just wanted to chime in with my one and only anecdote:

A friend of mine from high school had a pretty serious stutter. We would (unfairly) tease him about it, but he always took it in stride and was readily accepted by everyone based on his cheerful demeanor. We were all in the marching band together, and by the time he was a junior he was in a leadership role. Not only did he bark out orders (with some difficulty), but he had to give instruction to younger band members.

Today he's working for a garage as a tow truck driver while pursuing a nursing degree. Every summer he works with me teaching at a music camp. He still has his stutter, but he's learned to handle it quite well. On the first day of every camp, he explains to the kids that he has a stutter and there's nothing that he can do about it. He politely asks them to be patient with him if he has trouble with his words. The children have always respected him (most like him quite a bit), and there has never been an incident of the kids mocking him. His honesty and acceptance of himself seems to be the key. The stutter has never gotten in the way of his ability to instruct the students.

ETA: The dude isn't anything special to look at, but he's always got a cute girlfriend too. Just goes to show that the ladies like a man who takes his time with his words.

Last edited by Sinisterniik; 11-25-2012 at 12:37 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 11-25-2012, 01:43 PM
wheresmymind wheresmymind is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
I can imagine the difference. I am just wondering if it's really helpful. Because, as you may know, there is no cure for it.
There's no cure for it in the sense that there is no pill or potion you can take that will completely fix your stutter forever. But as others have anecdotally noted, targeted therapy DOES help a great deal, to the point that some people can almost completely eliminate their stutter. Some might respond better or worse than others, and it will take patience and hard work, but working with a specialist over time will almost certainly give you some improvement. I don't know you obviously, but it sounds like even a small improvement might give you a huge boost in confidence, which will make dealing with your stutter much easier. I'd strongly encourage you to make an appointment with a specialist, and keep us updated. Has there been an "Ask the stutterer" thread yet?
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 11-25-2012, 02:13 PM
luv2draw luv2draw is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Here is a list of more people who stutter whose names you may recognize...... many work in theater, film, TV, broadcasting--all fields where speaking in public is common.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_stutterers

Last edited by luv2draw; 11-25-2012 at 02:14 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 11-25-2012, 02:16 PM
Saintly Loser Saintly Loser is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
Yes, of course. But they are of little help. Plus I was told by doctors there was no exact cure for this disability.
There isn't, AFAIK.

I'm a middle-aged stutterer. I'm not terrible -- I've known people with far worse stutters than mine -- but it's there.

There are things one can do to work around it. I have no problems with rote material or (oddly) with public speaking to a group, or with reading out loud. One thing I can do (and I don't know if other stutterers are able to do this) is, when I feel it happening (I feel it more than hear it) is just stop. And then it sort of passes. So although others will hear an abrupt, maybe long, pause, they don't hear the t-t-t-t-t-t-t thing that is typical of stuttering.

Also (and this is definitely a non-FDA-approved treatment), alcohol, in moderate quantities, helps. Obviously that's not something that can be done at work, or in many circumstances, but in social settings it helps. I've often wondered if being self-conscious about stuttering makes it worse, and so alcohol, by easing or eliminating the self-consciousness, helps with the stutter.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 11-25-2012, 04:12 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Interview through Skype. Any stutter can be blamed on a poor internet connection.

I've briefly developed a stutter twice in my life. Both times from extreme stress and lack of sleep. The worst was my final semester in college. I was carrying 18 hours and under tremendous strain. Finishing school and rest got rid of the stutter.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 11-25-2012, 07:40 PM
China Guy China Guy is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 9,385
Here is a link to the disability law handbook. https://www.disability.gov/viewResource?id=13847806

Basically, it covers ADA and the amendments to it. You should also Search your State, as individual States will also have laws to protect those with disabilities.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 11-25-2012, 08:05 PM
Dignan Dignan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
taskmgr.exe, do you live in the United States? If not, then I can't speak to your individual situation culturally. No matter where you live, one thing that will be true is that you should get your education. Put whatever caused you to flunk out behind you. Start college again, get educated, and learn skills.

I'm not aware of anyone in my circle with a stutter. There could be people I know, but it isn't noticeable. A couple of years ago there was a saleswoman with a stutter at a local Banana Republic. She was in a customer-facing position. I asked her about jeans, and it was apparent right away that she had a stutter. She was beautiful, which might have factored in to her hire. She was able to help me find jeans the same as anyone without a stutter would.

Are you actively applying for jobs? Are you qualified for any work in particular? At 19, would it be possible to get something in construction? If you're going to college, and you have a "college job", it may not be what you'll do for your career. The school might have job opportunities. If you aren't applying for jobs, start there. The worst that will happen is you won't get a response. If you get interviews, then that at least provides interview experience, even if you don't get the job. A positive attitude, and good work ethic can make up for any other (perceived) short-comings.

I use a wheelchair. Obviously our situations are different, but we both have disabilities. I graduated from college, and I have a job. People generally want to be helpful. It makes them feel good. I think most people will understand your issue. If someone is a jerk about it, try not to let it bother you. I don't know what it was like for you growing up with a stutter. Kids can be cruel. Adults can be too, because people can be cruel, but people will grow out of it, or you won't care so much. The people who don't care about your stutter are the really good ones. Think of it as a filter. People who don't want to be around you because you stutter aren't people you want to be around anyway. The main thing is to get an education. Wherever you're going to school, check if there is a disability services office on campus. They might have some therapy available, or maybe the school has some kind of speech therapy school where you could go.

There was an episode of True Life on MTV about young people and stuttering. I don't know if it will do anything for you. There was one about paralyzed people too. It helped me remember that I'm not the first person to go through it.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 11-25-2012, 10:24 PM
Springtime for Spacers Springtime for Spacers is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
I had a severe stammer (as we call it in the UK) up until I was in my mid twenties. These days most people I meet don't notice it. That's not due to my being cured but having learned better strategies for managing it.

Number one is the one nearly all stammerers develop -- avoiding the problem words or finding substitutes. A lot of people see this as a problem in itself, and it can be, for example if you're not saying things you want to say. I seem to have developed a large vocabulary to give me a better choice of words. I never liked my first name and found the initial letter really hard to say, really horrible in the first week of a new school year when teachers were demanding that we say our names all the time. I happily adopted the nickname my friends gave me, which begins with a sound I can say, and use it to this day.

Number two relates to the weird sounds that some stammerers, me included make when they're struggling for speech. In some cases making a particular noise can somehow free up the words. There was a British TV personality, Patrick Campbell who would whistle. As a little kid I would make gobbling noises and contort my face with the effort of speaking then I graduated to clicking my tongue, which still made strangers look at me a bit funny, and now use a soft whisht sound, which passes under the radar.. So find a mannerism that is socially acceptable. A stammering friend would gently thump his chest, quite a common strategy, which doesn't seem to bother people.

Number three is very important. Recognise that no one, not professional speakers, not even newsreaders speak with perfect fluency, everyone hesitates, stumbles over their words and occasionally seizes up completely. (Incidentally that's why people don't notice my residual stammer. ) Recognising this helps with the vicious social anxiety feedback loop that stammerers can get in to. You are worried that you will stammer, when you actually do you feel worse. The people you are with notice your stress, you notice them noticing and get worse and so on.. The thing is it's OK to stammer. Just keep talking. If you can get your point across and seem unfazed then your listeners will relax about it too. Yes, it will be a case of fake it til you make it.

I never had any speech therapy. My parents believed it would make the problem worse. I wonder if it would have helped me to find my management strategies earlier. OTOH my chest thumping friend did have some speech therapy but it was useless as he didn't stammer when in the therapist's office.

Last edited by Springtime for Spacers; 11-25-2012 at 10:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 11-26-2012, 07:03 AM
Nava Nava is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by taskmgr.exe View Post
Perhaps, you are right. But, I doubt anyone with heavy/major stuttering problem could hide it in front of camera, or could find a way so that he doesn't seem to have problem with stuttering at all.
If they know which words/phonemes give them trouble and the filming is prepared, they can make sure those are avoided. Depending on the situation they can also have retakes.

Not a stuttering problem, but I had a teacher who couldn't pronounce R and his name included two, three with the honorific... on the first day of class, he'd go to the blackboard, write

"Doctor Irurre"

and say "that is my name. Why w'ite it? Because I can't say it well! I say doctod iduddde, but I do expect any of you who don't have a medical pdoblem to say it nodmally. Thank you!"

We had much more of a problem with his agoraphobia than with his Rs.



Years ago I happened to meet an Australian who stuttered. We were in NYC; him, his friends and another person were the only native English speakers in a group of about 20 people. Dude lit up like the sun when us foreigners (including several pretty girls near his age, which was clearly a plus) told him that we actually understood him better than his friends because he spoke slowly and carefully.

Last edited by Nava; 11-26-2012 at 07:06 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 11-26-2012, 02:38 PM
Fool in the Rain Fool in the Rain is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 388
As many have eluded to, a stutterer can do any job if he applies himself.

I am a stutterer, elementary and high school was very hard for me, especially the other kids, as you can imagine. One of the schools enrolled me in a speech therapy class, but it wasn't productive (looking back I don't think they really knew what to do with a stutterer in the 70s) I had few real friends, and if it wasn't for sports and books I probably would have dropped out.

When I left school, I felt I had no real future with the stutter and I let it hold me back for many years (too many years), working in a mill for ok money. Many times while working there I was told "you should do more with your life, you're too smart to be here." Yes even there, there were the jerks who laughed and made fun of my stutter. I hid in a shell for many years and just worked and 'lived'.

When the mill announced closing and lay-offs, I had to make a decision with my life. With the echoes of the friendly advice, I took the plunge at 33, went to college, got my degree and now work for a utility as an electrical engineer, where I have to work with and speak with customers and co-workers on a daily basis.

Over time, I began to realize my reason for not moving forward was me, not my stutter. My self-consciousness and tendency to focus on it when I talked, caused me to stutter even more. I found myself doing little tricks to avoid it altogether like changing the pitch of my voice slightly (usually lower), and spoke slightly slower. If I get excited, I force myself to stop, take a deep breath and relax. Like Saintly Loser, I feel it, and have learned to recognize the feeling, and make adjustments accordingly, and it is slowly becoming nearly an unconscious reaction now.

I'm now 43 and am forever grateful to those people who made me realize I can do better and push myself beyond my 'disability'. They didn't see a stutterer, they saw someone who was holding himself back because of it. My self-esteem is better, my career is better, and overall my life is better.

Don't let it hold you back, strive for your hopes and dreams.

Last edited by Fool in the Rain; 11-26-2012 at 02:39 PM.. Reason: paragraphs really help
Reply With Quote
Reply



Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@chicagoreader.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Publishers - interested in subscribing to the Straight Dope?
Write to: sdsubscriptions@chicagoreader.com.

Copyright 2013 Sun-Times Media, LLC.