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  #1  
Old 03-26-2013, 10:25 PM
ekedolphin ekedolphin is offline
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"It's in the store; you HAVE to sell it to me!"

(This requires a lot of exposition, but trust me, there is a question at the end!)

I'm currently working at a Blockbuster store that's in its seventh week of a going-out-of-business sale. Shortly before the sale started, we were given a Protected List of movies and games that we were required to immediately pull off the shelves and ship back to the distribution center or to other stores, because the studios don't want us selling them at such a greatly-reduced rate.

The list contained practically every big-budget film that had been released on home video since November of '12, and practically every rental video game we had on the shelves at that time. With the exception of perhaps one or two video games that I may be unaware of, we shipped back our rental video games, and every video game sold in the store since the sale, was one that was already a previously-viewed product (PRP) before the sale began.

We've still been processing customer rental returns, however, though obviously the number of check-ins we've had has decreased dramatically over time. (If I had to guess, by now we're averaging maybe one return per week.) By now any successful return is almost certainly a Combo Pass rental, because Blockbuster only allows 30 days to return an overdue movie before it becomes unreturnable.

So:

A couple days ago, a customer returned an XBox 360 copy of Assassin's Creed III while I wasn't there. Someone placed it on top of the video game cabinet, which is in easy sight of customers as they exit the store.

We're frequently asked by customers if we have any video games left. This being Week 7, we only have one video game left: The Shoot for PlayStation Move, which no doubt will still be there when we close in a month.

After I told this to a customer, he turned to leave the store, and lo and behold his eyes locked onto that copy of Assassin's Creed III. "Can you sell me that?" he asked.

Very professionally, I apologetically replied in the negative, saying that the game had just been returned, and because it was on a Protected List, we had to send it back to the distribution center. He nodded understandingly and left. And I put the game elsewhere, behind the opposite-side counter, a little harder for customers to see.

Problem solved, right? Well, no. This afternoon before I came in, a customer saw that game standing behind the counter (in an employees-only area of the store), grabbed it, and demanded that my boss TJ sell it to him.

TJ had to spend a good five minutes telling him why he couldn't sell it to him. Angrily, the customer stormed out, leaving the game behind, thank goodness. (No word on whether the customer wanted it for the $2.99 [rental] price on the sticker).

Customer comes back in (or calls?) 10 minutes later, and says that common-law of the United States says that because the item was in the store, in view of a customer and not explicitly exempt from sale, Blockbuster had to sell him the game. "You've got no choice." Another long argument ensued, ending when TJ basically said, "Fine, go ahead and sue us."

If I'd been there I like to think I'd have come up with a snappy remark about the customer committing criminal trespassing by going behind the counter in the first place. But anyway:

1. Was the customer correct in saying that Blockbuster could not deny him the right to purchase the game, even though it wasn't on the sales floor, because it was in view of a customer?

2. Was the customer committing criminal trespassing by going behind the counter in the first place?

3. If both answers are "yes", wouldn't the customer's initial crime in #2 have nullified #1?
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  #2  
Old 03-26-2013, 10:28 PM
Leo Bloom Leo Bloom is offline
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OK, listen up: I did not pull a tl;dr on this, though tempted, so now you owe it two of us to reply.
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  #3  
Old 03-26-2013, 10:36 PM
Alley Dweller Alley Dweller is online now
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While there is certainly a valid legal concept in the United States known as "common law," here is a rule of thumb you can use: When someone starts citing their rights under "common law" there is a 99% probability that they are a legally ignorant nutjob just making stuff up or repeating something that some other nutjob told them. (Law professors writing journal articles or legal briefs are not included in this rule.) I'm sorry, but I hear this nonsense about common law and about the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) being the supreme law of the land so much from tax protester nutjobs that it sends up instant flags.

In any case, it's highly unlikely that whatever this so called right is would be a federal one (unless you are in Washington DC), but if there is any law concerning it (common or statutory), it would be a state law.
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Old 03-26-2013, 10:37 PM
Gary "Wombat" Robson Gary "Wombat" Robson is offline
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I am not a lawyer, so I won't give a legal answer to any of your questions.

From a practical point of view, I would have said, "Yes, I'll be happy to sell you this game. That will be $100, please."
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  #5  
Old 03-26-2013, 10:38 PM
silenus silenus is online now
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1. IIRC, there is no such thing as "common law" that applies to the whole US. Even if there was, logically the customer is wrong anyway. Would you have to sell him your lunch if he spotted it in the break room? Your sister if she was an employee? No, So his assertation is bogus to begin with. The game was not an item for sale, therefore you don't have to sell it to him. Hell, even if it was for sale, you don't have to sell it to him.

2. Probably.
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  #6  
Old 03-26-2013, 10:43 PM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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You dont have to sell anything...to anyone

Do you have to sell them your shirt....the keyboard for your computer...

The easier answer for such folks is "sir that copy is damaged and non functional"
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  #7  
Old 03-26-2013, 11:53 PM
Derleth Derleth is online now
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Look up invitation to treat, specifically the case Fisher v Bell.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisher_v_Bell
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  #8  
Old 03-27-2013, 12:09 AM
handsomeharry handsomeharry is offline
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Well, first of all, Blockbuster cannot deny anybody their rights to purchase anything.
Blockbuster can, however, refuse to sell anything that they wish to refuse to sell.

I would have pistol-whipped the idiot, and sent him out without any Assassin's anything.
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  #9  
Old 03-27-2013, 12:13 AM
Ambivalid Ambivalid is online now
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Originally Posted by handsomeharry View Post
I would have pistol-whipped the idiot, and sent him out without any Assassin's anything.
But his return visit most assuredly won't be empty-handed.
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  #10  
Old 03-27-2013, 12:18 AM
Rick Rick is offline
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Originally Posted by Gary "Wombat" Robson View Post
I am not a lawyer, so I won't give a legal answer to any of your questions.

From a practical point of view, I would have said, "Yes, I'll be happy to sell you this game. That will be $100, please."
Here let me fix that for you
From a practical point of view, I would have said, "Yes, I'll be happy to sell you this game. That will be $1000, please."

So the store fixtures are on display. Can I buy the freezer case at my local Walmart?
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  #11  
Old 03-27-2013, 12:57 AM
usedtobe usedtobe is offline
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An advertisement (pretty much ANY advertisement) is NOT an offer to sell; it is a solicitation for offer.

IOW: I put out a widget on what is clearly a sales counter with a sign reading "Widget $19.99".
You pick it up, present it and your $19.99 to me at the cash register and say "I want to buy this".
So far THERE IS NO CONTRACT to sell nor one to buy.
There was a solicitation of an offer: "Widget $19.99" means "I want you to offer me $19.99 for this widget"
There is an offer to purchase: your possession of the item and the presentation of the money.

At this point neither of you is under contract to do anything.

It is when I take the offered money that there has been an offer AND an acceptance - now you have a contract.

This is why the used car dealer can advertiser "2005 Honda Civic $500.00" and tell you there ain't any such thing available to you, or the store doesn't have to honor a misprinted price label - that steak is not going to be yours for $2.4999, no matter how much of a fool you make of yourself yelling "common law". (In fact, the "ad = solicitation, NOT an offer" rule IS common law).
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  #12  
Old 03-27-2013, 02:05 AM
astro astro is online now
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I suspect you were dealing with a Sovereign Citizen.
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  #13  
Old 03-27-2013, 02:12 AM
Little Nemo Little Nemo is online now
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The basic legal principle here was you were dealing with an idiot.

What possible law would require a store to sell any item that was inside the store? If I went into a WalMart and told them I wanted to buy the cash register, would they have to sell it to me?

Obviously, a store is not obligated to sell something that it specifically is not putting up for sale - like a video game on a protected no-sale list.
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  #14  
Old 03-27-2013, 02:41 AM
Princhester Princhester is offline
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What usedtobe said. Whether or not the item was nominally for sale has nothing to do with it.
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  #15  
Old 03-27-2013, 02:44 AM
cochrane cochrane is online now
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Originally Posted by handsomeharry View Post
Well, first of all, Blockbuster cannot deny anybody their rights to purchase anything.
Blockbuster can, however, refuse to sell anything that they wish to refuse to sell.

I would have pistol-whipped the idiot, and sent him out without any Assassin's anything.
I am not a lawyer and the law may vary in your state, etc., but a merchant may refuse service to anybody for any reason provided it is not discriminatory. A business can refuse service to anybody for acting like an asshole.
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:23 AM
Mangetout Mangetout is offline
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I went into a cake shop once and asked if they would sell me a wasp - after all, they had one in the window...
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  #17  
Old 03-27-2013, 03:32 AM
Princhester Princhester is offline
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... and would they?
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  #18  
Old 03-27-2013, 05:12 AM
handsomeharry handsomeharry is offline
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Originally Posted by Ambivalid View Post
But his return visit most assuredly won't be empty-handed.
Hmmmmm....good point.

OK, let's try this: "I would have pistol-whipped the idiot, and sent him out without any Assassin's anything and then gone on vacation!"

I feel pretty good about that one. Yep. That's the ticket.

Last edited by handsomeharry; 03-27-2013 at 05:12 AM..
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  #19  
Old 03-27-2013, 06:43 AM
kayaker kayaker is online now
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Originally Posted by cochrane View Post
A business can refuse service to anybody for acting like an asshole.
I own a small business in PA. Several times I've told assholes to GTFO. I explain that once I've asked them to vacate the premises (aka GTFO) they are trespassing. If they do not leave I call the cops.
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  #20  
Old 03-27-2013, 07:39 AM
Mdcastle Mdcastle is offline
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It's been posted in another thread how many firearms manufacturers dealers will not sell to law enforcement in New York or California. So my take is that they could refuse to sell the game for any reason, provided it's not because you're black. Back in my high school days some of my friends tried to buy a humongous quantity of toilet paper late at night and the store flatly refused to sell it to them.

Story in the Dilbert book about how one guy desperately needed a part and finally found a place that had one left, but they refused to sell it to him because then they'd be out of stock.

Last edited by Mdcastle; 03-27-2013 at 07:41 AM..
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  #21  
Old 03-27-2013, 07:40 AM
Quercus Quercus is online now
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Originally Posted by usedtobe View Post
An advertisement (pretty much ANY advertisement) is NOT an offer to sell; it is a solicitation for offer.

This is why the used car dealer can advertiser "2005 Honda Civic $500.00" and tell you there ain't any such thing available to you, or the store doesn't have to honor a misprinted price label - that steak is not going to be yours for $2.4999, no matter how much of a fool you make of yourself yelling "common law". (In fact, the "ad = solicitation, NOT an offer" rule IS common law).
The general point about not being required to sell anything is OK, but in most places there are some laws regulating advertising of prices, specifically to outlaw the 'bait and switch' that the used car dealer is trying to pull. While they'll vary from place to place, most would have an exception for good faith but obvious mistakes like the $2.499 steak dinner.
But advertising a price that you have no intention of ever meeting is typically going to be illegal.

(In the incident in the OP, the item was not being advertised and was pretty obviously not even being offered for sale, so false advertising laws clearly wouldn't apply. )
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  #22  
Old 03-27-2013, 07:40 AM
Cheesesteak Cheesesteak is online now
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Originally Posted by ekedolphin View Post
1. Was the customer correct in saying that Blockbuster could not deny him the right to purchase the game, even though it wasn't on the sales floor, because it was in view of a customer?

2. Was the customer committing criminal trespassing by going behind the counter in the first place?
1) no. You cannot deny someone service as a result of their gender, race, creed, etc. You can deny service for any other reason, or no reason at all.

2) Maybe, if it was clearly labeled "Employees Only" But good luck getting the police interested in arresting a guy because he stepped behind the counter. If he refused to leave the store (or refused to vacate his position behind the counter) after you told him to GTFO, the police would likely make him leave.
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  #23  
Old 03-27-2013, 08:46 AM
FoieGrasIsEvil FoieGrasIsEvil is offline
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I find the idea of someone suing a company that's tanking bigtime to be funny.
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  #24  
Old 03-27-2013, 11:56 AM
Toucanna Toucanna is offline
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IANAL. I think the simplest explanation might be to tell the customer that the publisher had demanded that all Blockbuster stores return any copies the stores had of specific video and v-game titles. Thus, that copy of AC3 was no longer Blockbuster's property to sell. While BB would love to have accommodated the customer's request, regrettably, they could not.

FWIW, YMMV etc.
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Old 03-27-2013, 12:19 PM
Si Amigo Si Amigo is online now
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Originally Posted by Mangetout View Post
I went into a cake shop once and asked if they would sell me a wasp - after all, they had one in the window...
I'm expecting a large supply of wasp in a couple of weeks. Send me your address and I'll send you a box full.
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  #26  
Old 03-27-2013, 12:19 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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There’s two issues here:

1. Could BB refuse to sell a product to a customer? Yes.

2. Could BB refuse to give a customer an advertised discount on a product? Maybe not.

See, it seems not so much that BB was refusing to sell the product, it’s more like BB was not wanting to give it’s advertised discount on a product, if it was displayed for sale. I’d be like saying “Any game 50% off”, then telling a customer “Well, no, not these hot selling games, just these crappy games no-one wants to buy.” This could be considered “bait and switch” or any of a number of other violations. You can’t use “right to refuse service” to get out of something like this. The DA, Judges, etc would not look kindly on the idea that you were ‘refusing service’ to anyone who wanted to take advantage of your advertised deal.
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  #27  
Old 03-27-2013, 12:32 PM
md2000 md2000 is online now
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A store can refuse to sell whatever they want to whomever they want, with a few provisos:

Obviously, as mentioned, you cannot discriminate. "We don't serve your kind... droids."

If the store seems to be engaging in an unfair business practice - some jurisdictions have laws against bait-and-switch, false advertising, etc. However, typically these need to be proven through pattern of behaviour, since any one incident would be explained as a misunderstanding" or something.

As previously mentioned, the customer is an idiot.

As prviously mentioned, there is no "common law" for the USA; commerical activiy is up to the individual states. If the guy says "USA common law" in the context of local commerce, already it's a flag he's an idiot who knows not whereof he speaketh.

There is a common argumentative technique known as "bluster", aka "screaming asshole" where they try to BS and intimidate someone into doing what they want. Somehow, when this does not work, some of these guys just get more frantic and loud.

Of course, a store that refuses to sell something to a customer after having it available is probably not long for this planet... Oh, wait...

Last edited by md2000; 03-27-2013 at 12:33 PM..
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  #28  
Old 03-27-2013, 09:42 PM
usedtobe usedtobe is offline
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Originally Posted by Quercus View Post
The general point about not being required to sell anything is OK, but in most places there are some laws regulating advertising of prices, specifically to outlaw the 'bait and switch' that the used car dealer is trying to pull. While they'll vary from place to place, most would have an exception for good faith but obvious mistakes like the $2.499 steak dinner.
But advertising a price that you have no intention of ever meeting is typically going to be illegal.

(In the incident in the OP, the item was not being advertised and was pretty obviously not even being offered for sale, so false advertising laws clearly wouldn't apply. )
Sorry - I was trying to keep it short. Full situation:
Dealer has 1 clunker which he features in the local Reader paper it is the largest pic on his full-page ad.
He is legal in that there is (at time of print) A 2005 Civic for which he will accept $500.
That car will be sold before I get there. My point is that I cannot point to another 2005 Civic on the lot and demand he accept my offer of $500 for the other Civic.

I Probably have used the one-super-stripped-down "NEW Impala - $21999".*
And the fellow who demands the "New Impala" in the showroom be sold at that price


* - I've noticed many are now adding tiny print "one at this price"
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  #29  
Old 03-27-2013, 10:36 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is offline
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I had a similar situation, but I was the customer and wanted something.

When HD-DVD was still around, a Jack Ryan box set was shipped and then immediately recalled before it could even hit the shelves. A very small number of copies were released and were fetching $1200 on eBay. I went to a Walmart, while on a trip, and they had two copies! That's an easy $2400 in my pocket from just spending $80.

It was locked in a glass case, so I got the guy, he carried it to the register, then rang it up. The display on the register said something like "Do Not Sell - Recalled." I never got an attitude, but I tried to convince him several times to sell it to me. He said since it wouldn't ring up, he wasn't selling it. I asked to see a manager and heard the same thing. I left, not pleased.

Later that night, I went back to try for the other copy, $1200, or a very rare item in my collection if it didn't sell, was still sitting in that case. I went through the same thing again, but this time I offered to pay him the amount on the case AND pay him personally that amount. My bride didn't work, so I went home empty handed.

I got to touch it thought. Two of them...

Last edited by FordTaurusSHO94; 03-27-2013 at 10:38 PM..
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:56 PM
Biffy the Elephant Shrew Biffy the Elephant Shrew is online now
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My bride didn't work
Sheesh, offering him money wasn't enough?
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  #31  
Old 03-27-2013, 11:10 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is offline
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Ha! I didn't think to wed the guy.
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Old 03-28-2013, 01:05 AM
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Originally Posted by handsomeharry View Post
Hmmmmm....good point.

OK, let's try this: "I would have pistol-whipped the idiot, and sent him out without any Assassin's anything and then gone on vacation!"

I feel pretty good about that one. Yep. That's the ticket.
Or just assassinate him. After all, what's better: the game or the real thing?
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Old 03-28-2013, 01:41 AM
ekedolphin ekedolphin is offline
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Originally Posted by FordTaurusSHO94 View Post

It was locked in a glass case, so I got the guy, he carried it to the register, then rang it up. The display on the register said something like "Do Not Sell - Recalled."
Yeah; not directly related to the OP, but to this quote: Walmart's registers seem to be pretty sophisticated. (At least, in comparison to Blockbuster's antiquated, MS-DOS, using-the-same-hard-drives-since-1993 system). Here in Virginia it's illegal to sell alcoholic beverages after midnight. Walmart's computer system won't even allow them to do it accidentally, much to the relief of two employees I asked about that.
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Old 03-28-2013, 08:39 AM
md2000 md2000 is online now
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Yeah; not directly related to the OP, but to this quote: Walmart's registers seem to be pretty sophisticated. (At least, in comparison to Blockbuster's antiquated, MS-DOS, using-the-same-hard-drives-since-1993 system). Here in Virginia it's illegal to sell alcoholic beverages after midnight. Walmart's computer system won't even allow them to do it accidentally, much to the relief of two employees I asked about that.
Many register systems now can tell interesting items and will beep and ask the clerk to verify "Purchaser over 18" for restricted movies, cigarettes, etc.
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Old 03-28-2013, 09:47 AM
kopek kopek is offline
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I own a small business in PA. Several times I've told assholes to GTFO. I explain that once I've asked them to vacate the premises (aka GTFO) they are trespassing. If they do not leave I call the cops.
Ditto. We have a list where I work of customers who have been "fired" by anyone on staff and a list of a couple who are basically "call the cops on entry".

The short version in PA is you can refuse anyone anything basically until ordered otherwise by the court. A person could appeal on different grounds from discrimination to hardship but the burden is on them.
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  #36  
Old 03-28-2013, 01:45 PM
Toucanna Toucanna is offline
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Maybe you could tell the customer, "Oh! That [item]! Sorry, it's damaged and doesn't work. We're sending it back to the distributor for credit."

Last edited by Toucanna; 03-28-2013 at 01:47 PM.. Reason: Typos. D@mn dication auto-correct thingy mis-hears *everything*.
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Old 03-28-2013, 01:58 PM
hajario hajario is online now
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Airport gift shop in Sydney, Australia. A German couple brought an item to the counter that had the wrong price tag on it. They were told by the clerk that the price tag was a mistake and that it was $60 instead of $20. The German guy pitched a big fit and told him that he had to be sold the item at the cheaper price and that that was the law. The clerk, of course, refused. As they were walking out I asked him how he came to be an expert on Australian law but he refused to answer.

It should be obvious that that wouldn't be the law anywhere. Otherwise, I could just put any price tag that I want on an item and demand to pay that price.
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Old 03-28-2013, 02:04 PM
GaryM GaryM is offline
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Some folks used to switch tags, that why most stick on tags used with a pricing gun are scored so it's obvious it was tampered with.
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  #39  
Old 03-28-2013, 02:05 PM
Saint Cad Saint Cad is offline
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But of course there's the assumption it was an honest mistake and not an attempt to get him interested in an item then surprise him with the full price.
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  #40  
Old 03-28-2013, 02:26 PM
drachillix drachillix is offline
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Some folks used to switch tags, that why most stick on tags used with a pricing gun are scored so it's obvious it was tampered with.
For a real treat nowadays, they print the UPC code for a similar cheaper item/smaller size and just apply the sticker over the original one...
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  #41  
Old 03-28-2013, 02:33 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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Wait, are you trying to say that customers sometimes are not 100% accurate with matters of law? So the movie theatre I worked for wasn't in violation of federal law by not having Diet Coke?
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  #42  
Old 03-28-2013, 02:52 PM
Eliahna Eliahna is online now
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Originally Posted by hajario View Post
Airport gift shop in Sydney, Australia. A German couple brought an item to the counter that had the wrong price tag on it. They were told by the clerk that the price tag was a mistake and that it was $60 instead of $20. The German guy pitched a big fit and told him that he had to be sold the item at the cheaper price and that that was the law. The clerk, of course, refused. As they were walking out I asked him how he came to be an expert on Australian law but he refused to answer.

It should be obvious that that wouldn't be the law anywhere. Otherwise, I could just put any price tag that I want on an item and demand to pay that price.
That is the law. If the item is marked at two prices, it is illegal for the store to sell it at the higher price, but they can withdraw it from sale.

Cite: http://www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/Co...and_facts.html

If it was in a supermarket that is a signatory of the voluntary Scanning Code of Practice, then the first item that scans higher than the marked price is free, and if the customer is buying multiple of that item, the rest are marked down to the lower price.

Cite: http://www.anra.com.au/Scanning%20Co...s/ScanningCode
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  #43  
Old 03-28-2013, 03:07 PM
FordTaurusSHO94 FordTaurusSHO94 is offline
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I did get one over on Walmart for the wrong price of an item though. They had XBox 360 controllers with the battery charger and battery on a rack. I think they were $70 at the time. The pricetag below them was $20. It even had a description of the item. A friend of mine was buying a game, so I pointed to it and asked the guy if it was wrong. He said yeah, and pulled the price tag off. I asked him if I could buy it for the price that it was listed at. He said he technically had to sell it at the price. I hadn't planned to, but I ended up with a spare controller and charger that night.
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  #44  
Old 03-28-2013, 03:27 PM
tdn tdn is offline
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Yeah, I got a $60 game for $20 at Game Stop that way. They weren't happy about it.
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  #45  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:06 PM
destineal destineal is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2012
I once had an incredibly annoying related experience (from the customer's point of view). I was doing an IP camera installation in a medium-sized town about 5 hours away from home. Lightning struck the building I was working in and killed the Ethernet port on my computer. I went to the local Office Depot for an Ethernet to USB adapter and found nothing on the shelves. I asked an employee and he said "I've seen one of those in the back-I'll get it for you." He brought back the exact item, all packaged up neatly for retail sale. I took it to the register, where it rang up for $9,999. That seemed a little steep to me and the cashier, so she called over her manager. He told me that piece was for store use only and couldn't be sold. I asked him under what conditions a store computer could possibly need that piece and he had no answer but still wouldn't sell it to me. I unsuccessfully tried the other stores in town that might stock such a piece and finally had to give up and come back the next week (Major pain in the ass).
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  #46  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:31 PM
Kimballkid Kimballkid is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Almost $10,000 for a simple ethernet to USB adapter?!!

Last edited by Kimballkid; 03-28-2013 at 04:31 PM..
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  #47  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:41 PM
araminty araminty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eliahna View Post
If it was in a supermarket that is a signatory of the voluntary Scanning Code of Practice, then the first item that scans higher than the marked price is free, and if the customer is buying multiple of that item, the rest are marked down to the lower price.

Cite: http://www.anra.com.au/Scanning%20Co...s/ScanningCode
I love this. I got a copy of Les Miserables (10th anniversary concert, and still the best!) for free from my local Woolies, since the scanned price was higher than the shelf tag price.
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  #48  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:44 PM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Sunny California
Posts: 6,438
Quote:
Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
Many register systems now can tell interesting items and will beep and ask the clerk to verify "Purchaser over 18" for restricted movies, cigarettes, etc.
In fact, fancy features like this aren't new in computerized cash registers. I worked for a very small family-owned company in the 1990's that made cash register software. Their product goes back at least as far as 1990, and it was full of configurable features like this. It could have one configurable age limit for tobacco products, and a different configurable age limit for alcohol products.

It also knew the birthdays of the cashiers (if the store manager enters that data), so if you have an under-age cashier signed on and the customer tries to buy cigs or booze, it will tell the cashier to call a manager to do the sale.
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  #49  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:47 PM
DrDeth DrDeth is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: San Jose
Posts: 21,993
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eliahna View Post
If it was in a supermarket that is a signatory of the voluntary Scanning Code of Practice, then the first item that scans higher than the marked price is free, and if the customer is buying multiple of that item, the rest are marked down to the lower price.

Cite: http://www.anra.com.au/Scanning%20Co...s/ScanningCode
Yes, that’s great. But based upon what some posters seem to be saying, even if the customer qualifies to get it free, the business can just “refuse to do business with him”.
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  #50  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:51 PM
destineal destineal is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimballkid View Post
Almost $10,000 for a simple ethernet to USB adapter?!!
I guess maybe their registers didn't have a "do not sell" function so they programmed in a ridiculous price.
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