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  #1  
Old 07-29-2014, 11:23 PM
araminty araminty is offline
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I want to see a wild moose!

Hello, moose fans. Where would be the best place in North America for me to see and photograph a wild moose?

If possible, I'd like to shoehorn this moose viewing into a potential summer trip next year, we'll be in Minnesota in early June, and would also like to catch a Women's World Cup match in Canada in the same month.

Am I fooling myself, or is this a possibility?
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  #2  
Old 07-29-2014, 11:34 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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in northern Minnesota you might see moose, elk or lions.

though the population has declined. Maine has more.
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Old 07-29-2014, 11:38 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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Come to northern NH or Maine, and there are moose tours in the evenings with 95+% success records. It's not hard to spot a moose near dusk along Moose Alley (Rt 16 north of Berlin), you can almost guarantee it.
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Old 07-29-2014, 11:44 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is offline
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Wi nøt trei a høliday in Sweden this yër?
See the løveli lakes
The wøndërful telephøne system
And mäni interesting furry animals
Including the majestik møøse
__________________
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  #5  
Old 07-29-2014, 11:49 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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Best place I've been for moose sightings has been around the Grand Tetons. There best/easiest sighting I had was three subault males that wandered around the campground at Gros Ventre at dawn and dusk. The moose seemed pretty nonchalant about it, calmly cruising through people's campsites...but everyone was wise enough to give them a wide berth. They would lounge by the river during the heat of the day; The riverbank was high enough there so you could climb up for a bird's eye view of them. Pretty neat.
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  #6  
Old 07-29-2014, 11:53 PM
ddsun ddsun is online now
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This Wikipedia article includes range. Northern Minnesota and Canada are both areas where you are likely to see Moose. I'd look for park areas near your intended destinations and plan on some nature time.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moose...d_distribution

If you want to range a little wider, you could work in something like Yellowstone.
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  #7  
Old 07-29-2014, 11:58 PM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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Drive the Trans-Canada Highway between Sudbury and Winnipeg. Some friends are doing this, and they saw one crossing the road a couple of days ago.

It was bigger than their Fiat.

Last edited by Sunspace; 07-29-2014 at 11:59 PM..
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  #8  
Old 07-30-2014, 12:47 AM
Shagnasty Shagnasty is offline
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Come to northern NH or Maine, and there are moose tours in the evenings with 95+% success records. It's not hard to spot a moose near dusk along Moose Alley (Rt 16 north of Berlin), you can almost guarantee it.
I will second that but make it even more specific. New Hampshire can surely produce moose for you in general but the Kancamagus Highway is your most sure-fire bet. Even if you don't see one (unlikely), it is still one of the wildest and most pristine stretches of wilderness this side of Alaska. When I lived in nearby Vermont, my family flew up and insisted on seeing moose so I sent them there. They saw several including some young ones. You can see them basically on demand on that remote stretch of road but fill up your car before you go. There are no real stores or gas stations for many miles and that adds up for a round-trip. Besides the moose, there is a reason that stretch of road is so protected. It is gorgeous and pristine, New Hampshire is a vastly underrated state.

http://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserR...Hampshire.html
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  #9  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:04 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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A visit to Frostbite Falls, Minnesota might offer some moose encounter. Is flying sqvirrel there too!
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  #10  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:09 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Wi nøt trei a høliday in Sweden this yër?
See the løveli lakes
The wøndërful telephøne system
And mäni interesting furry animals
Including the majestik møøse
Is that nøt the Nøble Mudjøkøvis?
The Modern Hiawatha
By George A. Strong

He killed the noble Mudjokovis,
With the skin he made him mittens,
Made them with the fur side inside,
Made them with the skin side outside,
He, to get the warm side inside,
Put the inside skin side outside;
He, to get the cold side outside,
Put the warm side fur side inside;
That's why he put the fur side inside,
Why he put the skin side outside,
Why he turned them inside outside.
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  #11  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:12 AM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Drive the Trans-Canada Highway between Sudbury and Winnipeg. Some friends are doing this, and they saw one crossing the road a couple of days ago.

It was bigger than their Fiat.
But why did the moose cross the road?
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  #12  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:39 AM
Spoons Spoons is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunspace View Post
Drive the Trans-Canada Highway between Sudbury and Winnipeg. Some friends are doing this, and they saw one crossing the road a couple of days ago.

It was bigger than their Fiat.
They were driving between Sudbury and Winnipeg in a Fiat? Braver than I am, and I've driven that route a number of times. Note that that's a distance of about 1500 km/900 miles, and the distance between gas stations can be great in spots--there is a Shell station in Upsala, Ontario that knows this, and prices its gas accordingly. My Chevy truck's tank is big enough that I can avoid that Shell, but I doubt a Fiat could.

Back to the OP: I've seen moose in northern Ontario, southern Manitoba, and in Newfoundland. I've certainly seen elk (easily mistaken for moose) here in Alberta, most notably in and around Banff; so if you're not picky about large ungulates, you might consider that as well.

And if you're interested in bears, Alberta, Canada's Waterton National Park/Montana, USA's Glacier National Park is the place to go to see grizzly bears. Most times I've been to Waterton (it's an hour-and-change away, and a nice weekend getaway), I've seen grizzlies.
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  #13  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:50 AM
El_Kabong El_Kabong is offline
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I will go with places I've seen moose without making any special effort to do so:

1. The aforementioned Grand Tetons

2. In front of the BP building in downtown Anchorage, Alaska (two females; apparently they neglected to bring their ID badges, so were just sort of hanging around the entrance).

In addition to the above, all my Newfie friends constantly talk about all the times they've nearly hit moose on the trans-Canada, so it would seem anywhere outside St. John's will do.

Last edited by El_Kabong; 07-30-2014 at 01:51 AM..
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  #14  
Old 07-30-2014, 02:27 AM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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Originally Posted by Spoons View Post
They were driving between Sudbury and Winnipeg in a Fiat? Braver than I am, and I've driven that route a number of times. Note that that's a distance of about 1500 km...
Better. They're driving from the Greater Toronto Area to Haida Gwaii. And back. 5000 km one way.
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  #15  
Old 07-30-2014, 03:28 AM
kambuckta kambuckta is offline
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Don't come to Australia, no moose here.

But if you perchance wish to see a dropbear......

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  #16  
Old 07-30-2014, 03:45 AM
ataraxy22 ataraxy22 is offline
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Lots of mooses in Alaska. I startled one along the McCarthy road a few weeks ago, and instead of getting out of the road, it ran straight down it just ahead of my car for a good 45 seconds or so before finally diving into the underbrush on one side. Silly moose!
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  #17  
Old 07-30-2014, 09:06 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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My yard is pretty good That's Fredrick.
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  #18  
Old 07-30-2014, 09:26 AM
mcgato mcgato is offline
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I saw three moose on the Gunflint Trail in northern Minnesota. The Gunflint Trail is a road going north out of Grand Marais. The three moose appeared to be a mother, father, and child. Big as hell. I think moose are fairly common there.

Also saw a couple driving through Maine and Nova Scotia one summer trip. Got a picture of the one in Nova Scotia.
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  #19  
Old 07-30-2014, 09:36 AM
DCnDC DCnDC is offline
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If you encounter one, make sure it knows you are there and give it plenty of space. They are generally fairly tame, and not particularly stupid animals, but they have poor eyesight and seem to be aware of how big they are; if startled they are likely to just charge at you rather than run away. If they do charge at you, it's most likely just a bluff, but you don't want to wait around to find out. But really, the most likely scenario is they'll just ignore you.
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  #20  
Old 07-30-2014, 09:37 AM
Jackmannii Jackmannii is offline
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Drive the backcountry in Maine, preferably at night at high speeds, and your chances of a moose encounter are pretty good.

Last edited by Jackmannii; 07-30-2014 at 09:37 AM..
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  #21  
Old 07-30-2014, 09:42 AM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
I will second that but make it even more specific. New Hampshire can surely produce moose for you in general but the Kancamagus Highway is your most sure-fire bet.
The Kanc is good, but Moose Alley didn't get its name for no reason. You will see moose there pretty much every summer evening at dusk in one of several wallows. The Kanc is a good bet, but not as high probability in my experience.
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  #22  
Old 07-30-2014, 09:57 AM
elbows elbows is offline
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Last year, we were headed north from Sudbury, to visit a friend's woodland cabin, and when we reached where the highway winds between wetlands on either side, didn't we see a Mama moose and calf pop up onto the road to cross over to the lake on the other side.

Traffic completely stopped as everyone was just awestruck. It was all over within a couple of moments but I doubt anyone who saw it will forget any time soon.

They slowly sauntered across, seemingly aloof to the gawkers cars, but it was still easy to detect the Mama glancing around for threats to her babe. Just her eyes darting around as they lumbered forward.

It was a great experience and whenever we pass that spot now, I'm always eyeballing everything, hoping for a repeat!
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  #23  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:09 PM
Fleetwood Fleetwood is offline
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Look for recently cut areas like power line right of ways or timber land. If hardwoods are growing in, they will come in to feed on the new growth.
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  #24  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:14 PM
thatguyjeff thatguyjeff is offline
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Originally Posted by mcgato View Post
I saw three moose on the Gunflint Trail in northern Minnesota. The Gunflint Trail is a road going north out of Grand Marais. The three moose appeared to be a mother, father, and child. Big as hell. I think moose are fairly common there.
Not so sure about that - could be my bad luck - or your good luck.

I travel to Northern Minnesota a lot. Was just up there last weekend. My parents live up in the Iron Range. It's practically my second home. And I've been up on the Gunflint Trail I don't know how many times. I camp in the BWCA every year, sometimes twice a year. When I was a kid, I lived up there whole summers some years.

I've never seen a wild moose, not once.

Ely, International Falls, Rainy Lake, Gunflint Trail, Grand Marais, Hibbing, Biwabik, Eveleth, Virginia... all combined, literally hundreds of times. Never a moose.

Saw a black bear cow and cubs once (only once ever) about 15 years ago.
Saw the northern lights twice (last time was over 10 years ago).

Jeez - sounds like it's just my bad luck after all.
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  #25  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:27 PM
John Mace John Mace is online now
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Wi nøt trei a høliday in Sweden this yër?
See the løveli lakes
The wøndërful telephøne system
And mäni interesting furry animals
Including the majestik møøse
Elk, in Europe. "Moose" is Americanski.
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  #26  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:32 PM
lieu lieu is offline
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The Kenai Penninsula, AK, especially a little south of Girdwood and around Kenai/Soldatna.
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  #27  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:32 PM
Cyros Cyros is online now
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The last time I was staying at the Jasper Park Lodge in Alberta there was a moose that was poking around the door to our cabin. We were kind of stuck for about 20 minutes before it decided to move along. I was about 5 ft away from it with just a thin door between us.
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  #28  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:37 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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Until you decide where to go, twin moose calves playing in sprinkler. No insipid music version.
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  #29  
Old 07-30-2014, 01:50 PM
jtur88 jtur88 is online now
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In Newfoundland, if you drive the length of the island at night, there is a pretty good chance that you'll hit one and total your car. There is just one road across Newfoundland, and it averages more than one moose kill per night. I've seen several there, and also very narrowly missed hitting one in Quebec. But that was over tens of thousands of miles of driving, so there is no high probability you will see one anywhere.

Last edited by jtur88; 07-30-2014 at 01:52 PM..
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  #30  
Old 07-30-2014, 02:03 PM
M.Constant M.Constant is offline
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Mynd you, møøse bites Kan be pretti nasti...
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  #31  
Old 07-30-2014, 02:32 PM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
If you encounter one, make sure it knows you are there and give it plenty of space. They are generally fairly tame, and not particularly stupid animals, but they have poor eyesight and seem to be aware of how big they are; if startled they are likely to just charge at you rather than run away. If they do charge at you, it's most likely just a bluff, but you don't want to wait around to find out. But really, the most likely scenario is they'll just ignore you.
It was my understanding that the worst thing you can do is get between a mom moose and her calf.
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  #32  
Old 07-30-2014, 02:37 PM
Vita Beata Vita Beata is offline
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Originally Posted by enipla View Post
My yard is pretty good That's Fredrick.
Frederick is handsome! Great photo.

Araminty, I'm from MN, have never seen a moose too close, but wish you luck in your quest.

Last edited by Vita Beata; 07-30-2014 at 02:40 PM..
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  #33  
Old 07-30-2014, 04:07 PM
araminty araminty is offline
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Wow, thanks for the advice everyone! Keep it coming!
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  #34  
Old 07-30-2014, 04:12 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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Originally Posted by Son of a Rich View Post
It was my understanding that the worst thing you can do is get between a mom moose and her calf.
That can be bad, but I'm more concerned about male moose during rut (Oct/Nov). They'll charge anything they think is a threat, and during rut, everything is a threat.
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  #35  
Old 07-30-2014, 04:58 PM
GrandWino GrandWino is offline
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Go to Cicely, Alaska. There's this one moose always wandering around the town. I saw a documentary about it.
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  #36  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:06 PM
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Wherever you go, go in the spring when moose are attracted to road salt in the vegetation in ditches after a salt deficient winter. Once you are there, cruise about a dawn and at dusk, for that's when they tend to be out.

Minnesota moose have been having a hard time. The moose population in that state has dropped in half in the last four years. The northeast (particularly the Gunflint Trail) is where their population is the most dense in the state, but even then it has been dropping there since 2006.

If you don' mind a truly beautiful drive, head to the top of Lake Superior and cruise for moose along the Trans-Canada from the lake up to Manitouwadge. I usually come across moose when out that way in the spring. While you are at the of Superior, charter a motorboat and visit the Slate Islands, which are teeming with caribou (yes, you can camp there,- it is a provincial park -- and yes, they may walk through your campsite).

If you can get to Toronto or Ottawa, then head for the Highway 60 corridor in Algonquin Park, where there are a lot of moose. I suppose it might be possible to not see a moose at sundown during the spring, but I'd be surprised., for there really are a lot of them. The visitor centre overlooks a wetland that moose tend to like.
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  #37  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:07 PM
johnpost johnpost is offline
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
That can be bad, but I'm more concerned about male moose during rut (Oct/Nov). They'll charge anything they think is a threat, and during rut, everything is a threat.
they hump subcompacts.
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  #38  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:10 PM
Muffin Muffin is offline
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
That can be bad, but I'm more concerned about male moose during rut (Oct/Nov). They'll charge anything they think is a threat, and during rut, everything is a threat.
And they'll try to have sex with anything they think is a female moose. One of my friends and his brother were chased in their canoe down Pickerel Lake in Quetico by a swimming moose after the brother made a moose call. Fortunately, they were skilled paddlers (both white water paddlers and one a sprint racer), so over a few hours they were able to pull away from the amorous moose.
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  #39  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:13 PM
elfkin477 elfkin477 is online now
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Originally Posted by Telemark View Post
Come to northern NH or Maine, and there are moose tours in the evenings with 95+% success records. It's not hard to spot a moose near dusk along Moose Alley (Rt 16 north of Berlin), you can almost guarantee it.
Yet I've lived in NH for nearly 25 years and have never seen a moose outside of captivity. There's only 10,000 in the state, it's not like we're tripping over them. Stick to the tours and don't expect to see them otherwise.
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  #40  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:14 PM
Muffin Muffin is offline
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Correction: make that from the Trans Canada up to Manitouwadge (not along the Trans Canada).
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  #41  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:19 PM
Frank Frank is offline
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Originally Posted by Shagnasty View Post
You can see them basically on demand on that remote stretch of road but fill up your car before you go. There are no real stores or gas stations for many miles and that adds up for a round-trip.
It's 36 miles between Lincoln and Conway.
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  #42  
Old 07-30-2014, 06:42 PM
Saintly Loser Saintly Loser is offline
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
In Newfoundland, if you drive the length of the island at night, there is a pretty good chance that you'll hit one and total your car. There is just one road across Newfoundland, and it averages more than one moose kill per night. I've seen several there, and also very narrowly missed hitting one in Quebec. But that was over tens of thousands of miles of driving, so there is no high probability you will see one anywhere.
Yes, I've driven that road a number of times. Pretty much once you're off the Avalon peninsula, the island is lousy with moose.

Also in Gros Morne, where I've encountered moose while on foot and while camping.
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  #43  
Old 07-30-2014, 11:23 PM
Telemark Telemark is offline
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Yet I've lived in NH for nearly 25 years and have never seen a moose outside of captivity. There's only 10,000 in the state, it's not like we're tripping over them. Stick to the tours and don't expect to see them otherwise.
Seriously, go out to the moose wallows along Rt 16 at dusk and you will see a moose more often than not. They're pretty easy to find.
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  #44  
Old 07-30-2014, 11:28 PM
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I took a three day canoeing trip in Algonquin Park a few years ago. We were canoeing in a waterway connecting two lakes and there was a female moose and her baby at the water's edge having a drink of water. We all glided by very quietly. It was beautiful.
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  #45  
Old 07-30-2014, 11:58 PM
cochrane cochrane is online now
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But why did the moose cross the road?
Why, to get to the lodge meeting, of course.
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  #46  
Old 07-31-2014, 12:18 AM
Sam I Am Sam I Am is offline
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Originally Posted by Muffin View Post
Wherever you go, go in the spring when moose are attracted to road salt in the vegetation in ditches after a salt deficient winter. Once you are there, cruise about a dawn and at dusk, for that's when they tend to be out.

...

If you can get to Toronto or Ottawa, then head for the Highway 60 corridor in Algonquin Park, where there are a lot of moose. I suppose it might be possible to not see a moose at sundown during the spring, but I'd be surprised., for there really are a lot of them. The visitor centre overlooks a wetland that moose tend to like.
Every few years we drive through Algonquin in the spring (late April / early May). Every time we have seen moose, when they come to the highway for the road salt. Often we see 10 or more in a weekend. A couple of years ago we almost didn't see any, but finally found one the day we were leaving.
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  #47  
Old 07-31-2014, 08:23 AM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is online now
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Originally Posted by johnpost View Post
lions.

though the population has declined. Maine has more.
Where in Minnesota can I see a lion?!?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Wi nøt trei a høliday in Sweden this yër?
See the løveli lakes
The wøndërful telephøne system
And mäni interesting furry animals
Including the majestik møøse
I'm getting Monty Python flashbacks, was this in the Holy Grail? In the beginning part when people are getting sacked?
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  #48  
Old 07-31-2014, 09:19 AM
highrollinwooded highrollinwooded is offline
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolves_...on_Isle_Royale
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  #49  
Old 07-31-2014, 09:46 AM
Son of a Rich Son of a Rich is online now
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The Bull Moose.
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  #50  
Old 07-31-2014, 12:51 PM
araminty araminty is offline
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Wow, Isle Royale sounds fascinating! Has anyone been there?
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