Amazing Photography: When Coffee Meets Milk

Check out these pictures - Amazing Photography: When Coffee Meets Milk

Looks wonderful…wonder what camera was used…

I’m no photographer, but my guess would be that it’s just a regular camera and someone with really fast reflexes took the photo. Too bad there’s no links or we could email the photographer and try to figure it out.

…or full of caffeine.

Looks like Irene Müller.

(Google, yo.)

Mildly related hijack:

from Coffee & Cream: a cumulus cloud reflected over a still pond

Anybody?

Responding to OP:

It lists exactly what camera was used right under each photo…or is that not what you mean?

Maybe I’m confused!

Here’s more photos from the same series, and without the camera model listings and associated adlinks.

That’s exactly what I was going to say. In the case of “Coffee Meets Milk”, it’s a Nikon D60 digital camera. However, that’s the same camera I have, and none of my pictures look like that, so obviously there must be some sort of trickery going on. :dubious:

Very nice.

Looks like a basic fast exposure photography setup. I’m guessing it’s a flash bulb hooked up to a microphone. The shutter is kept open the entire time and the microphone captures the sound of the milk hitting the coffee and flashes the bulb at some fixed time after that.

I think those camera references are just adverts - no claim that they are actually the cameras used.

Why would there be trickery? Of course either of those cameras can take a photo like that.

Those pics are by a good friend of mine who I worked with for years. His site is: http://www.liquidsculpture.com/ This guy is truly amazing. He is a renaissance-man, software guy who does this as a hobby. He has hooked up an array of devices to create drops of liquid and release them at precise intervals. He can re-create very similar scenarios til he gets it exactly right.

He does not use photo shop (except for a few times when advertisers have asked him to create a specific image) and the colors are because of the backgrounds and dyes in the liquids.

Check out the gallery, but please don’t steal the images. This is one of my favorites.

I checked the EXIF for a smattering of photos in the pbase link and there are two cameras being used: the Nikon D50 and the Nikon D70. Both of these are older and less advanced technology than the advertised Nikon D60 and Canon 40D.

That said, you don’t need advanced digital technology to take these pictures. The first generation of digitial cameras could make these. All you need is a body with a macro lens, and a flash with an extremely short flash duration. For Nikons, an SB-800 has a flash duration of 1/1050 sec at full power down to 1/41,600 second at 1/128 power (its lowest setting). Do this in a room where the flash is providing all the light for the photo, and the flash duration effectually becomes your shutter speed, freezing motion as shown in the photos above. (Most cameras top out at 1/8000 sec for fastest shutter speed).

For shutter plane cameras you have to use a relatively long shutter speed with a high speed flash, otherwise you just get a vertical stripe showing where the shutter was when the flash went off. It is indeed the strobe duration that is critical.

The EXIF shows the shutter speed at 1/500, which is the sync speed for these cameras. As long as you’re slower than the sync speed, you’re fine (although a lot of these cameras have high-speed sync which allow synchronization up to 1/8000 sec with certain flashes.)

another example of Six Degrees of Doper Separation… :slight_smile:

Things have really changed. Back in the 70’s I think the sync speed was 1/30 or 1/60 (if memory serves). Also, I meant “focal plane shutter” not “shutter plane” in my previous post.

It was usually around 1/60 to 1/125 for cameras from the early 70s. The Nikkormat FT (mid-60s) sync’ed at 1/125, for example. The Canon FT (same era) was 1/60. By the late 80s, we were heading to 1/250 sync.

You’ve been whooshed, my friend. I thought I was being clearly ironical.

On the other hand, you’re saying the gap is what exactly? Talent? Care to take this outside?! :stuck_out_tongue: