Are you an Anglophile?

I started this because there is another thread where the BBC tests you on your knowledge of ‘citizenship’, as defined in a leaflet.

Well clearly we need a better test for knowledgeable people to see how much they know about England (and there’s a lot of them here!).

So I will start. (I know there’s are other Britons, and they are welcome to add a question or two!)
I have chosen some categories and tried to give a serious and a light-hearted question in each one.

If anyone posts answers, I’ll be back with answers!

A) History:

What was a main cause of the first English Civil War? (1642-1646):

a) The King tried to confiscate the property and wealth of the Church
b) Parliament challenged the King over policy, especially wars
c) There was no clear successor to the throne

What is King Alfred reputed to have done to annoy a wife?

a) burnt some cakes
b) accused her of being a witch
c) broken wind repeatedly

B) Geography:

England is surprisingly warm, considering its Northern latitude. This is mainly due to:

a) being an island
b) mountain ranges
c) the Gulf Stream

England is part of:

a) Great Britain
b) The United Kingdom
c) The Commonwealth

C) Mathematics:

In 1971, England changed the way it calculated one of the following. Which one?:

a) currency
b) road speeds
c) land measuring

What is 42 the answer to?

a) The number of people in the Cabinet
b) The number of profession football clubs
c) Life, the Universe and Everything

D) English

‘Cockneys’ use a sort of dialect including rhyming slang. How do you become a true ‘Cockney’?

a) be born within the sound of Bow Bells
b) be born in London AND be working class
c) live in the East End of London

Which of the these authors uses the phrase ‘nice set of wheels, John’?
N.B. Spelling has been modernised to give no clues!

a) Chaucer
b) Shakespeare
c) Dickens

E) Television

When the British Broadcasting Corporation first started a news bulletin in 1954, in the first few weeks the newsreaders had to wear:

a) a suit and tie
b) a dinner jacket
c) they weren’t seen on screen

‘Doctor Who’ has recently returned to delight a new generation of youngsters with his incredible TARDIS. What does this acronym stand for?

a) Time and Relative Dimensions in Space
b) Tremble as revolting Daleks invade successfully
c) United Network Command for Law and Enforcement

F) Government

a) The English constitution states that the (hereditary) Monarch rules the country
b) The English constitution states that the Prime Minister has ultimate power
c) there is no English constitution

Who summons members of the House of Commons at the the state opening of parliament?

a) The Speaker of the House of Commons
b) Black Rod
c) The senior Knight of the Garter

C? Not sure about this one… I know the Catholics and Protestants were on opposite sides, but aren’t sure if that was causative or not…

C

C (but I am shocked if you find this bloody country warm. It’s June and it’s still damn cold around here.)

All of the above, kind of. It’s not so much part of the Commonwealth as the primary nation in it.

Currency

Life, the Universe and Everything.

to be born within the sound of Bow Bells. Living in the East End only makes you dodgy :slight_smile:

Dickens?

Suit and Tie

Time and Relative Dimensions in Space

There is no English Constitution, and not likely to be an EU Constitution anytime soon either :slight_smile:

[/quote]

Black Rod?

A few more questions, in no particular catagories:
Britain’s oldest orchestra is based in which city?

A) Edinburgh
B) Manchester
C) London
D) Liverpool
What was or is the Windrush?

A) A ship
B) A weather system
C) A plant
D) A farming method
Only one of these cathedrals is situated in a city. Which one?

A) Rochester
B) Wells
C) Bury St Edmunds
D) Blackburn
Until 1949, twelve Members of Parliament were chosen not by a public vote, but by…?

A) Senior members of the army & navy
B) A vote in the House of Lords
C) Universities
D) The Prime Minister

Unfortunately that doesn’t excuse you refering to British topics as being, by default, English. You’d have been better making the quiz British.

Or numbering the sections and options in an identically confusing fashion… :slight_smile:

A

  • b? At a guess.
  • a

B

  • c (and England isn’t an island either)
  • all the above

C

  • a, this was a British decision
    -c

D

  • a
  • c?

E

  • b, British
  • a, British/Welsh

F

  • c, there is no English government to have a constitution.
  • b

(I’ve got a headache and am being picky and grouchy, don’t mind me. :frowning: )

No wonder you all lost the Empire–could you number the questions, please?

Rather than cut and paste forever–here I go:

History-
a and a

Geography-
c and d

Math(s)-
a and a

English-
a and a (no clue as to the wheels quote).

TV(sorry, telly)-
b and a

Government-
c and b

other questions: (WAGS on my part, as is most of this)-
Edinburgh
Wells
MP-answer is d.

And it’s not that it’s warm–the climate does not have temperature extremes due to the Gulf Stream.

Most of this I picked up from murder mysteries, Monty Python, Fawlty Towers AbFab etc. hope I passed!

1 out of 3 - Wells is correct

So, I won’t be relinquishing my USA passport anytime soon…
Y’all are stiil a great place to visit!

I didn’t intend to upset other parts of the UK. I wanted an English quiz and was going to put ‘Englishmen’, but that could be sexist!

Both you and eleanorigby are right about this!

  1. History:

What was a main cause of the first English Civil War? (1642-1646):

a) The King tried to confiscate the property and wealth of the Church
b) Parliament challenged the King over policy, especially wars
c) There was no clear successor to the throne

What is King Alfred reputed to have done to annoy a wife?

a) burnt some cakes
b) accused her of being a witch
c) broken wind repeatedly

  1. Geography:

England is surprisingly warm, considering its Northern latitude. This is mainly due to:

a) being an island
b) mountain ranges
c) the Gulf Stream

England is part of:

a) Great Britain
b) The United Kingdom
c) The Commonwealth

  1. Mathematics:

In 1971, England changed the way it calculated one of the following. Which one?:

a) currency
b) road speeds
c) land measuring

What is 42 the answer to?

a) The number of people in the Cabinet
b) The number of profession football clubs
c) Life, the Universe and Everything

  1. English

‘Cockneys’ use a sort of dialect including rhyming slang. How do you become a true ‘Cockney’?

a) be born within the sound of Bow Bells
b) be born in London AND be working class
c) live in the East End of London

Which of the these authors uses the phrase ‘nice set of wheels, John’?
N.B. Spelling has been modernised to give no clues!

a) Chaucer
b) Shakespeare
c) Dickens

  1. Television

When the British Broadcasting Corporation first started a news bulletin in 1954, in the first few weeks the newsreaders had to wear:

a) a suit and tie
b) a dinner jacket
c) they weren’t seen on screen

‘Doctor Who’ has recently returned to delight a new generation of youngsters with his incredible TARDIS. What does this acronym stand for?

a) Time and Relative Dimensions in Space
b) Tremble as revolting Daleks invade successfully
c) United Network Command for Law and Enforcement

  1. Government

a) The English constitution states that the (hereditary) Monarch rules the country
b) The English constitution states that the Prime Minister has ultimate power
c) there is no English constitution

Who summons members of the House of Commons at the the state opening of parliament?

a) The Speaker of the House of Commons
b) Black Rod
c) The senior Knight of the Garter

  1. Culture

Britain’s oldest orchestra is based in which city?

a) Edinburgh
b) Manchester
c) London
d) Liverpool

Only one of these cathedrals is situated in a city. Which one?

a) Rochester
b) Wells
c) Bury St Edmunds
d) Blackburn

  1. Miscellaneous

What was or is the Windrush?

a) A ship
b) A weather system
c) A plant
d) A farming method

Until 1949, twelve Members of Parliament were chosen not by a public vote, but by…?

a) Senior members of the army & navy
b) A vote in the House of Lords
c) Universities
d) The Prime Minister

  1. Sport

England have won the football World Cup in 1966, and the Rugby World Cup in 2003. Which uncle and nephew played in the respective finals?

a) William and Jonny Wilkinson
b) George and Ben Cohen
c) Bobby and Brian Moore
d) Corin and Steve Redgrave

Which of these is NOT a term or phrase used in cricket?

a) silly mid-on
b) bowling a maiden over
c) midfield dynamo
d) leg before wicket

Somehow I missed sport.

WAGs are:

c for the soccer/rugby and a for the cricket one.

Are we ever to get the answers?

I only feel I can give answers for my own questions:

The oldest orchestra is the Halle, in Manchester. Wells is a city, the other three are mere towns. The Windrush (properly the Empire Windrush) was a ship, which came to represent post-war immigration from the Caribbean. Twelve MPs used to hold ‘University Seats’, elected by dons of various Universities, with Oxford and Cambridge having two apiece.

B - dispute between the Parliament and the King. Actually, the Catholics didn’t play much of a role in the Civil War. To the extent it was a religious dispute, the fight was between different factions of Protestants: the episopalian Anglicans supporting the King, and various groups of Presbyterians, Congregationalists and Independents, often lumped together as Puritans, supporting the Parliament.

Compare the latitudes and weather of English and Scottish cities to, say, towns and cities of comparable latitudes in inland Canada. Glasgow is around 60º north and is pretty temperate; compare that to Uranium City, Saskatchewan, which is also at about that latitude. I know where I’d rather be in January.

Wot’s this “primary” bit?

From the Harare Declaration:

The U.K is just one of many members of the Commonwealth.

Sure there’s a British Constitution - it’s just not all written down in one document. It’s a mixture of statute law, common law, royal prerogative, and constitutional convention. Or, as the editors of Halsbury’s Laws of England, 4th ed., 1974, Vol. 8, issued under the auspices of the then Lord Chancellor, say:

[footnotes omitted]

Or, to give him his full title, the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod.

Since there’s only one question I know the answer to beyond a doubt, would someone tell me how many I get right through sheer guesswork? I bet it’s not many…

  1. History:

What was a main cause of the first English Civil War? (1642-1646):

a) The King tried to confiscate the property and wealth of the Church
What is King Alfred reputed to have done to annoy a wife?

b) accused her of being a witch

  1. Geography:

England is surprisingly warm, considering its Northern latitude. This is mainly due to:

c) the Gulf Stream

England is part of:

b) The United Kingdom

(I find this confusing since I thought the only distinction between two of these was if all of Ireland was included or not, which would mean England was in both. hmm)

  1. Mathematics:

In 1971, England changed the way it calculated one of the following. Which one?:

a) currency

(no more change of little value?)

What is 42 the answer to?

c) Life, the Universe and Everything

(but what is the question?)

  1. English

‘Cockneys’ use a sort of dialect including rhyming slang. How do you become a true ‘Cockney’?

c) live in the East End of London

(I don’t understand 40% of what is said on EastEnders, but understand 100% of what’s said on 24seven which didn’t take place in London, hence this guess)

Which of the these authors uses the phrase ‘nice set of wheels, John’?
N.B. Spelling has been modernised to give no clues!

b) Shakespeare

(my favorite line in his plays is “Tennis balls, my Leige” so I figure he’s hip)

  1. Television

When the British Broadcasting Corporation first started a news bulletin in 1954, in the first few weeks the newsreaders had to wear:

b) a dinner jacket

(Masterpiece theater had to get the idea somewhere)

‘Doctor Who’ has recently returned to delight a new generation of youngsters with his incredible TARDIS. What does this acronym stand for?

a) Time and Relative Dimensions in Space

(that last one has to do with a Spy show from before I was born, I believe)

  1. Government

c) there is no English constitution

Who summons members of the House of Commons at the the state opening of parliament?

a) The Speaker of the House of Commons

  1. Culture

Britain’s oldest orchestra is based in which city?

a) Edinburgh

Only one of these cathedrals is situated in a city. Which one?

b) Wells
8) Miscellaneous

What was or is the Windrush?

a) A ship
Until 1949, twelve Members of Parliament were chosen not by a public vote, but by…?

b) A vote in the House of Lords

(a has merit, though, because I like the band Army Navy)

  1. Sport

England have won the football World Cup in 1966, and the Rugby World Cup in 2003. Which uncle and nephew played in the respective finals?

c) Bobby and Brian Moore

Which of these is NOT a term or phrase used in cricket?

b) bowling a maiden over

Okay, how’d I do? Maybe we could do something like this for New England, population 14 million, which is significantly more than three (smallest) out of four united kingdom counties added together according to this site. I bet there are US dopers who’d do no better than those abroad :stuck_out_tongue:

Thank you for saving me the typing.

But, of course, England is just another word for the UK, Great Britain, the British Isles, isn’t it!

:mad:

Nope!

I’ve got a question to add:

The Prince of Darkness is:

a) Satan

b) Lucas

c) Ringo

Sorry about the delay - I’ve been busy doing reports in the last week of term. :o

  1. History:

What was a main cause of the first English Civil War? (1642-1646):

a) The King tried to confiscate the property and wealth of the Church
b) Parliament challenged the King over policy, especially wars
c) There was no clear successor to the throne

c)
The others have happened in English history e.g. Stephen + Mathilda went at it in the 1100’s.

What is King Alfred reputed to have done to annoy a wife?

a) burnt some cakes
b) accused her of being a witch
c) broken wind repeatedly

a)
Just an anecdote, but we learnt it in school.

  1. Geography:

England is surprisingly warm, considering its Northern latitude. This is mainly due to:

a) being an island
b) mountain ranges
c) the Gulf Stream

c)
Although it does indeed rain a lot here, and never gets very hot, we would be far colder without that ocean current.

England is part of:

a) Great Britain
b) The United Kingdom
c) The Commonwealth

All of them!
England + Scotland + Wales = Great Britain
Great Britain + Northern Ireland = The United Kingdom
All the countries in the United Kingdom, plus many places British armies have ‘visited’ form the Commonwealth.

  1. Mathematics:

In 1971, England changed the way it calculated one of the following. Which one?:

a) currency
b) road speeds
c) land measuring

All of them!
We used to have 12 pence = 1 shilling and 20 shillings = 1 pound (£1).
Now we have 100 pence = 1 pound (£1).
If this interests you, look up ‘guinea’, half-crown’, ‘farthing’ and ‘threepenny bit’!

What is 42 the answer to?

a) The number of people in the Cabinet
b) The number of profession football clubs
c) Life, the Universe and Everything

c)
My cite is the excellent series ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy’ by Douglas Adams. (His computer, Deep Thought, was undoubtedly the inspiration for Deep Blue, the chess playing computer from IBM.)

  1. English

‘Cockneys’ use a sort of dialect including rhyming slang. How do you become a true ‘Cockney’?

a) be born within the sound of Bow Bells
b) be born in London AND be working class
c) live in the East End of London

a)
Bow Bells is a Church in the East End of London. Cockney is just a tradition, but still gets referenced occasionally.

Which of the these authors uses the phrase ‘nice set of wheels, John’?
N.B. Spelling has been modernised to give no clues!

a) Chaucer
b) Shakespeare
c) Dickens

None of them! :o
This modern slang simply means ‘I don’t know you, but I like your car.’

  1. Television

When the British Broadcasting Corporation first started a news bulletin in 1954, in the first few weeks the newsreaders had to wear:

a) a suit and tie
b) a dinner jacket
c) they weren’t seen on screen

c)
The BBC started showing pictures to accompany the news. When newsreaders did appear, they were initially expected to wear dinner jackets.

‘Doctor Who’ has recently returned to delight a new generation of youngsters with his incredible TARDIS. What does this acronym stand for?

a) Time and Relative Dimensions in Space
b) Tremble as revolting Daleks invade successfully
c) United Network Command for Law and Enforcement

An easy one!
We used to hide behind the sofa in the 1960’s when Dr Who was first on. Wobbly sets? Check! Rubber monster suits? Check! Scary music? Check!
The fine US series, the Man from Uncle, was also popular decades ago.

  1. Government

a) The English constitution states that the (hereditary) Monarch rules the country
b) The English constitution states that the Prime Minister has ultimate power
c) there is no English constitution

c)
We’ve never got around to writing it down. We do have centuries of precedent and sort of ‘know’ who’s in charge…

Who summons members of the House of Commons at the the state opening of parliament?

a) The Speaker of the House of Commons
b) Black Rod
c) The senior Knight of the Garter

b)
An elderly gentleman, who knocks on doors etc.
There really is an Order of the Garter’, whose motto is ‘Honi soit qui mal y pense’ = ‘evil be to him who thinks it’.

  1. Culture

Britain’s oldest orchestra is based in which city?

a) Edinburgh
b) Manchester
c) London
d) Liverpool

Thanks to Gorillaman for this questions and answer (given above).

Only one of these cathedrals is situated in a city. Which one?

a) Rochester
b) Wells
c) Bury St Edmunds
d) Blackburn

Thanks to Gorillaman for this questions and answer (given above).

  1. Miscellaneous

What was or is the Windrush?

a) A ship
b) A weather system
c) A plant
d) A farming method

Thanks to Gorillaman for this questions and answer (given above).

Until 1949, twelve Members of Parliament were chosen not by a public vote, but by…?

a) Senior members of the army & navy
b) A vote in the House of Lords
c) Universities
d) The Prime Minister

Thanks to Gorillaman for this questions and answer (given above).

  1. Sport

England have won the football World Cup in 1966, and the Rugby World Cup in 2003. Which uncle and nephew played in the respective finals?

a) William and Jonny Wilkinson
b) George and Ben Cohen
c) Bobby and Brian Moore
d) Corin and Steve Redgrave

b)
George played full back (=defence) in 1966, Ben played winger in 2003.
Jonny Wilkinson scored the winning points in 2003. I made up William.
Bobby Moore was the captain in 1966. Brian (no relation as far as I know) played rugby for England, but was retired by 2003. He may well have commentated on the final.
Corin is an actor. Sir Steve (no relation as far as I know) won gold medals for rowing in 5 successive Olympiads.

Which of these is NOT a term or phrase used in cricket?

a) silly mid-on
b) bowling a maiden over
c) midfield dynamo
d) leg before wicket
[/QUOTE]

c)
A ‘midfield dynamo’ is typically a footballer with stamina who tackles well and inspires the team.
‘Silly mid on’ is a fielding position in cricket. Possibly silly means here close to the batsman, so you may get hit by the ball.
‘Bowling a maiden over’ means conceding no runs (maiden) in a set of 6 balls (an over).
‘Leg before wicket’ means you stopped the ball hitting the wicket with your leg. You are then out.

GomiBoy, you have scored 8 points out of 12.
75%!
You also gave witty comments. :slight_smile:

You can be compared to: Magnus Magnusson :cool:

Futile Gesture, you have scored 10 points out of 12.
83%!
You also gave cheeky comments.

You can be compared to: Jeeves :smiley:

eleanorigby, firstly we didn’t lose the Empire - we know where it is (we just don’t rule most of it any more!)

You have scored 8 points out of 15.
53%!
You also have an excellent Anglophile username. :wink:

You can be compared to: Carol Vorderman