Australians: Did my dream of Australia resemble in any way the actual country?

Last night I dreamed I went to Australia. It was reasonably clear, and made some sort of half-assed sense, which is unusual for my dreams. Seeing as how I’ve never been to Australia, the nation in my dream is probably coddled together out of fantasy and random crap I’ve heard about the country.

In my dream, I was trying to get to someone’s house in Random Large Australian City. The streets were covered in lots of twisty little lanes, but the weird thing was that in the middle of every street was a fountain – but not a regular fountain, almost more of a tiny little step pyramid with water flowing from the top. To cross the street you had to run up the side of the fountain and then walk back down the other side.

Then I squeezed into a car with a ton of people (we were packed in like sardines) and then we tried to take the highway, but the driver (not me!) went the wrong way up the highway offramp and into oncoming traffic. Somehow we escaped certain death and I abandoned the car. I made it to the house of whoever it was I was trying to find. They had a large family and a dog, and to celebrate my arrival, they laid out a meal of crawfish and corn (now that I’m lucid, I recognize this as being Louisiana crawfish boil, but I guess my brain decided Australians would eat it, too). FIN.

I can’t imagine the lawsuits that could result from those fountains in the middle of the road.
"There’s nobody coming on this side, I’ll just run across to the middle and…

SQUESH THUMP CRASH

Australians do drive on the wrong side of the road :smiley:

“The streets were covered in lots of twisty little lanes”,
Being a highly urbanised country and flat to boot, twisty lanes are usually only seen on TV in BBC costume dramas. Boring bitumen roads in a grid are standard issue.

“in the middle of every street was a fountain – but not a regular fountain, almost more of a tiny little step pyramid with water flowing from the top.”
Fountains aren’t common, and then usually in town civic centres. Being the driest continent on the planet, and having recently come out of the worst drought in recorded history, most cities were subject to water restrictions, and having running water for aesthetic purposes would be considered wastefully decadent.

"Then I squeezed into a car with a ton of people (we were packed in like sardines) "
With the mandatory seatbelt requirements, in a standard sedan it is not legal to carry more than the 5 seated passengers.

" then we tried to take the highway, but the driver (not me!) went the wrong way up the highway offramp "
Most commuting within a city is done on what we would term arterial roads and suburban streets.

"and into oncoming traffic. Somehow we escaped certain death and I abandoned the car. "
Australia’s national sport is killing yourself and possibly somebody else’s family on the roads. This typically involves speed, distance and unfamiliar roads. And we do drive on the LHS of the road, though no causal link between the two has been established

"They had a large family and a dog, "
For any number of sociological reason, Australians have the standard Western family of around 2.4 children . Population growth is principally driven by immigration.

“they laid out a meal of crawfish and corn”
Such Southern delicacies or other fare as ugly fried chicken, hash browns, peanut butter and jelly, oreoles and root beer would likely only grace the table if you were going to Canberra to visit the US ambassador

We do tend to have dogs though. :stuck_out_tongue:

Ugly fried chicken? I’d hurt you and six other people for some proper fried chicken. I’ve seen some very strange things advertised as Southern fried chicken. Mostly, chicken that has been fried in some manner with some sort of batter coating and is Southern only by the fact that we are in the antipodes. Don’t start me on things that are advertised to be Cajun.

And the word you’re looking for Oreos. And root beer, at least here in Sydney, is pretty readily available, although you’d probably only find some generally served if American guests were present. I can get it at most corner stores. I don’t usually though, because it was in a hot shipping container for a long time, and is thus kinda nasty.

You wouldn’t find any of this at the US Ambassador’s though, because that’s all really casual food. It’s like saying you’d find vegemite toast at the Austrailan ambassador’s dinners.

That said, crawfish have a passing resemblence to yabbies, and I have seen those served. Corn is good. Cornbread is impossible, there’s no proper cornmeal here. It’s all polenta stuff or something like corn flour. My family ships me some Martha White self-rising from time to time, and I feast!

But alas, your dream, OP, is nothing at all like Australia. But you shoud come visit, because Australia is an amazing, amazing place.

(I’m not just an expat, I’m an expat Mississippian!)

Yeah, two in my house. :slight_smile: Plus, the dog walker’s mafia in my neighborhood.

Dinner, no. Breakfast, definitely.

Never been to Canberra, then? I’m firmly of the belief that suburban Canberra is entirely made up of four blocks of identical twisty lanes on gimbals that they spin around while visitors are driving on them so that it looks a lot bigger than it is and no-one who doesn’t live there can ever find anything.

Indeed, but equally dual carrigeway asphalt, kerbed and guttered on both sides, even if laid out on a circular grid, isn’t my definition of twisty little lanes.

There are escalators up the side of the fountains, so you don’t have to run up them. Apart from that you’ve pretty much nailed it.

I had a dream i was in Sydney Harbour but i was near the Opera House .

See the blue stuff? Sydney harbour.
See the white thingy at the bottom? Opera House.
Your dream is accurate.