Chase. Fucking idiots.

I knew there was going to be trouble when the chucklehead behind the customer service desk told me that the person whose name is on the account needs to be there in order for me to close the account - after I told him my sister passed away and I needed to close her account.

4 people later, the wire transfer was processed to wire the money into the estate account at another bank. It never got there.

I schlepped, once again to the branch, showed them the death certificate, Court document, asked WTF happened with the wire transfer, and they bustled around for a half hour and cut me a check instead. Plus the wire transfer fee because, well, I guess it never happened.

So off I go to the branch again because I received a notice that there are insufficient funds in the (supposedly closed) account that is apparently being charged something from somewhere and of course when I call the number to track it down, they won’t tell me anything because I’m nowhere to be found on the account. Even after I went to a branch, showed them the docs, and closed out the account. Twice.

Next on my to-do list is to go to another Chase branch to find out what the hell happened to this fax (of the documents) the nice lady sent to the IRA department to get them to send me paperwork so I can get that closed out. whee.

I swear, it’s like everybody there is doing this for the first time. Everybody.

I’m right there with ya, man. My sister died three weeks ago and Bank of America is still giving us a hard time with her account, even though we have the death certificate and our parents went down to a branch.

Not to take away from the “Pit”-ness of the thread, but just keep in mind that people get really stupid when someone walks up to them and says someone just died. They get nervous and tend to do things wrong, I’ve found. Or they could just be fucking idiots. :slight_smile:

In any case, this shit sucks, so keep your head up and just try to get through it the best you can.

Is there a reason not to let Chase choke on their own paper work? I hope this isn’t too blunt but she’s dead, what are they going to do, give her bad credit? Deny her access to the Divine Treasury?

The estate needs to be settled, so the assets can be dispensed. Chase doesn’t care if the estate doesn’t get back it’s assets from them.

I like Chase. 99.9% of the time, my banking runs very smoothly. But when they fuck up, they fuck up big. My experience is that there’s precisely one guy in each branch who knows what the hell he’s doing. The rest of the branch staff can do simple stuff like depositing checks or getting you a new ATM card, but things like wire transfers and editing personal information are best left to the branch manager.

There is one recurring annoyance I need to address with Chase. When I got married, I linked my accounts with my wife’s accounts and we can see all the account balances and manage everything from their web interface. We moved and went into the branch twice to make sure they changed our address for all the accounts. For some reason, no matter how many times we correct it, the statements for my checking account end up going to my old address. Nobody at any of the Chase branches where I do business has been able to figure out why. Everything goes to the new address, except for the statements from my checking account. When they look it up in the database, they claim my new address is associated with every account. Yet, my statement keeps going to the old address. No one seems to be able to fix it.

I had a similar problem with a building society (they invest money + offer mortgages) here in the UK.
When my mother (she was my Dad’s carer) passed, I obtained power of attorney to look after Dad’s affairs.

The building society took four attempts to process the simple paperwork. :rolleyes:

Amongst other ‘gems’:

  • the branch manager didn’t have authority to accept the legal documents (everything had to go to Head Office, even though my Dad had had the local account for years)

  • the branch gave me the wrong forms … twice :smack: (the second time I asked the branch manager to double check personally - she still got it wrong)

  • the branch wanted a driving license as identification. I don’t drive, but offered a passport instead. This led to a 20 minute conference before they agreed.

And so on.

After six weeks there was still no sign of the forms - and Dad then died.

You can imagine how crass they were about finding the ‘death of an account holder’ forms.

Shouldn’t there be someone at a bank who’s good at handling such things? Maybe not any random teller, but I’d imagine this situation arises often enough that a given branch should have someone on hand who could handle things.

Not terribly long ago I had a mortgage with Coldwell Banker, a credit card with Capital One, and a bank account with Washington Mutual. Guess who owns them all now?

On the plus side: now I can see all my accounts on one website.

On the minus side: worse service, higher rates, additional fees, and many former benefits & services discontinued “to better serve our customers.”

Guess who’s switching to a credit union?

…and another thing - why do I have to enter a branch anyway? Other organizations I’ve dealt with with even more money at stake - Met Life, ING, Blue Cross - were fine with a phone call and mailing or faxing forms and legal documents.

That’s exactly what I thought, going in. But 2 out of the 3 people we explained the story to (as they kept passing us off to the next person, :rolleyes:) seemed not only unable to help, but also completely lacking in any kind of sympathy or concern for the situation. Not that it’s their job to give condolences, but it would have been nice to get something more than, “Uh huh, well, wait over there and Jim will be right with you.”

ETA: Sorry, just to make it clear: When we finally did get the right person to speak to, apparently she was at a loss too, because we sat there while she made a 20-minute call to corporate headquarters to find out how to handle the situation.

The real answer here is to go straight to the branch manager. Make him take responsibility for it. Don’t be rude. I’d reccomend saying something to the effect of:

“I need someone who can take care fo this problem. I have all the documentation. I don’t need to know what the problem is, but I expect it to be taken care of. Your bank has not met its legal obligations to transfer the money. I’m not mad at you, but I am angry at the bank’s lack of proper procedure and errors. We need this done, and if we have to get a summary court order, we will.”

Now, use this straight if they’re being stand-offish, because YOU have the power here and their arrogance or not, you can legally spank them. If the manager is more friendly, return that back. But be firm no matter what you do.

So close that checking account and open a new one.

Rates and fees on your Washington Mutual account are supposed to be grandfathered in under Chase.

It so happens that I just now logged off my former WaMu account, and it’s telling something about changes coming as of October 25.

I didn’t read it thoroughly, as I was only on to check my balance, so I’m not sure if I’m missing some nuances.

They were, for a while. Recently got a nice multipage pamphlet with microtype welcoming us to the Brave New World of Chase’s fee schedule.

The changes weren’t dramatic, but I was considering dumping them anyway, so it gave me the nudge I needed.

I think I threw mine away. Maybe I should give them a call and ask them to send me another one.

Hey, I work for the USPS. For me, job security is things getting mailed, not whether or not anyone reads them. :smiley:

Sorry to hear that, man! My dad is still handling some of the stuff that came up after my mom died, which is nearly a year ago now! While I understand that you can’t just call any bank to tell them that some bozo died and could they close his account and send all the money to yours, the amount of bureaucracy that the bereaved have to deal with is enough (to quote Krusty the Clown) to make Santa Claus vomit with rage.

And lose my grandfathered “no fee” status? No, thanks.

I know it’s too late for you, but one thing that the account holder can do while they’re still alive is to set up a POD or Pay On Death on their accounts. For this to work, the beneficiary needs to know that the POD exists and they need to know the account numbers.

Then, when they die, the named recipient can go to the bank and say “My Uncle Cecil had a POD on this account. Here’s a copy of their death certificate” and with a minimum of fuss, they give what’s in the account.

The last time I had to do this, I was out of the bank in under half an hour.

Some computers are just evil. I signed up for a Best Buy Rewards Card years ago, back when was I still living at my parent’s house. I’ve since gone to college, gotten married and moved four times. I’ve changed all my addresses with the state, utilities, banks, other stores, everything. But anything related to that Best Buy card continues to go to my mom’s house. I’ve changed it on the Best Buy website. I’ve watched register people change it in their computer system at Best Buy. I even called their customer service line once and had them change it.

It always reverts back to my mom’s address.

Ghosts in the machine man, ghosts in the machine.