Do Ethernet to WiFi Adapters exist?

I just changed my Internet provider and logistically I cannot connect my desktop to the new Router via a wire because it is in another room. I thought I could buy an adapter that plugs into the Ethernet port that would give me WiFi but I am having a hard time finding one online. All see are USB adapters but I would rather connect to the Ethernet port. Does what I am looking for actually exist? If not, what is a good solution? Thanks.

What you seem to be looking for is a WiFi Router, of which there are many varieties.

They exist, but they’re more trouble than they’re worth and offer no advantage. USB 2 and USB 3 are both faster than any WiFi, so you’re not going to get gigabit transfers anyway.

Onboard PC Ethernet ports are not designed to provide significant power to devices so I’m not seeing how this would work to begin with.

Just use one of these if you are averse to going the USB route.
http://www.amazon.com/Cisco-Linksys-WMP54G-Wireless-G-PCI-Adapter/dp/B000085BD8

Are you looking for a wireless bridge? I needed an ethernet connection for a VoIP phone, and use this. It’s easy to set up and use. There are cheaper ones out there.

They exist I have one near my TV to provide network connection to my medeia PC. If you search for wifi gaming adapter you will find them. They need to be plugged into power so they are not really convenient for a laptop. A wifi to USB adapter for a laptop is probably easier to use.

https://jet.com/product/detail/373120a0f5944536911cd14f9386f28b?jcmp=pla:ggl:electronics_a3:networking_bridges_routers_wireless_access_points_a3_other:na:na:na:na:na:2&code=PLA15&k_clickid=8846bde1-30da-45d8-896c-b5b2275ef57f&abkId=403-186468&gclid=CjwKEAiAzuK0BRCW4tiLpJT-8TISJADV8cw9WxZizT0bR_znYysifRczL-pclRY40v_KzCINWdrTyhoCc0Pw_wcB

Why?

Honestly I assumed it would be slower plus my PC has had weird USB issues in the past.

I’m a little confused and like leahcim, I’m wondering what about a wireless router won’t work for you?

“wireless network interface card for desktop”

If you have a slot open on the motherboard, adding a wireless network card is cheap and dead simple.

I think the OP does have a wireless router, but his PC does not have a wireless card in it, just a physical RJ-45 jack.

Sorry if I was confusing. I used to have DSL. I had a modem and a Router next to my PC. The PC was connected via Ethernet to the Router and the Router broadcast WiFI. I Just switched to Cable Internet. I have no Cable in the room where my PC is so the Cable Modem is in a different room. It serves as a router so it is broadcasting the WiFi. I no longer need my old Router. I was hoping there was something I could just plug into the Ethernet Port that would pick up the WiFi network the Cable Modem is broadcasting. I know there are cards but I was hoping to avoid opening my PC.

If USB WiFi adapters are just as good as an Ethernet connection, I guess I will go that route. I could have sworn I have seen devices that look like little antennae that you could just plug into the port but searching Amazon and Google did not produce anything like that. I appreciate the help so far. Does this help explain what mean?

Yes, your notions about internal USB speed being the limiting factor are incorrect. Your main speed limitation will be the strength of wireless connection itself.

Google Wifi - Ethernet bridge.

You can do this with DDWRT on a cheap Linksys router.

Aha, it does make sense now.

Yeah, the solution I’d go for is a USB adapter and plan on updating the desktop to something with wifi capabilities built in.

Yeah, per your last post that’s really the way to go. There are Ethernet to wireless adapters but they are kind of old school and aren’t that good. As for faster, a USB 2.0 port is 480 Mbit/s throughput, so that’s a bigger pipe than the wireless can produce unless you are talking about the new 802.11 AC standard, and then it’s theoretical speed…and USB 3.0 is something like 5 gbit/s so that’s a lot more pipe. If you’ve had trouble with USB ports in the past my suggestion is to upgrade your OS, since they are pretty plug and play these days. There are also tons (literally and figuratively) of products and brands for USB wireless systems on the market and you can get them basically everywhere…even Walmart has them.

Depending on what he wants to do the main limit will be his internet connection. If he wants to copy files from one computer to another computer in his house then the WIFI may be the limit but if he wants to surf the internet then his cable modem will be the limit.

For a desktop the link I provided earlier will work fine. But a USB dongle will probably be the easiest to setup up.

I think other posters have already answered this but just to clarify, wireless routers don’t work that way. The OP already has a wireless network and another router isn’t going to provide a seamless connection to it. For that you need a wireless bridge, either purchased as a dedicated device or a wireless router configured as a bridge. Most commercial routers can’t do that but a few can, and as mentioned, third-party firmware like DD-WRT (and also Tomato) can be configured in bridge mode.

A bridge can be an excellent solution because it’s completely transparent to the connected device, which needs no special drivers or wireless configuration, and which just thinks it has a wired Ethernet connection, and because a good bridge will be much more sensitive than a dongle or internal card and in fringe situations can provide much higher bandwidth. But since the OP is in the next room from the router, a wireless USB dongle is probably just as effective and much cheaper. As long as the computer has at least USB 2.0 or better, USB won’t be a bottleneck.

nm

Right. My initial understanding was that the OPs original setup was a regular modem that connected to their computer via ethernet with no wireless network and unspecified changes meant that was no longer an option. Also, a touch of hubris because I didn’t even think about the possibility that the desktop could be old enough or stripped down enough to not have included wifi capability.