Doctor and daughter buried in Jerusalem on what was to be her wedding day.

Dr. David Applebaum, head of the emergency department of Shaarei Zedek hospital in Jerusalem (where he treated many terrorist victims) was killed in Jerusalem when a bomb went off in a cafe where he and his daughter were sitting. Applebaum, as head of the department was often the first to report when a bombing occured in the city.

His daughter, Nava, who worked as a volunteer in the hospital with children suffering from cancer was to have been married tonight. Instead she and her father were buried today.

At the funeral Chanan (Nava’s groom) placed their wedding ring on her body as it was lowered to the grave.
Zev Steinhardt

So depressing.

Hospital workers said when he (Applebaum) didn’t report to the hospital following the attack, they immediately knew he was likely one of the victims.

My understanding is that in Israel’s retaliation against Hamas, they missed their target member but did inadvertently kill his eldest son, who also was to have married this weekend.

The whole think (obviously) is just such a waste of promising life. Both events sadden me deeply and I really don’t hold out much hope that the violence will ever stop. The wounds on both sides are just too deep.

Story in the Jerusalem Post (FREE registration required).

Zev Steinhardt

These two lives are more significant than the countless others snuffed out on a regular basis?

The thing that bothers me the most about stories like this is the cheapened value I put on the lives of people like the sons of Hamas leaders. My first reaction was “Well, if he didn’t want to die, he shouldn’t have been living in his $*@# terrorist father’s house.”

I hate feeling like this.

G-d rest the souls of David and Nava Applebaum, and G-d forgive and redeem everyone whose lives have been caught up in this whole mess.

What, is your “O” key broken?

Isn’t “god” the major reason behind all the killing?

Maybe if these people pulled thier heads out of the sand and used a little reason to define thier actions there would be a little less bloodshed.


I can’t tolarate intolarence!

Don’t forget the wedding bombed into oblivion by the USA in Afghanistan. A whole family.

Don’t forget all those children killed by Israely soldiers because they throw stones.

Don’t forget all those “collateral damage” victims in Iraq and Afghanistan… The terminology itself is an outrageous scandalous and very well thought attempt to dehuminise all those people.

I’m sorry, but I get constantly the impression that people, and US’ers especially, seem to value indeed the lives of people of one kind extremely more then the life of others.

But a life is a life and people suffer on exactly the same manner all over the world.

Salaam. A

Obviously not, since she used it four times in that sentence alone. The reason an O is missing from her sentence has been adressed on this board numerous times before.

Zev Steinhardt

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Hello?? They were firing their weapons into the air while the planes were flying overhead. The pilots thought they were under attack. Could it have been avoided? Certainly. But it’s not a deliberate murder as this was.

**

Then don’t throw stones at armed soldiers. :rolleyes:

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Yes, it’s unfortuante that people die in war. But (1) they weren’t deliberately murdered and (2) the end result (the liberation of Afghanistan and Iraq) from the previous oppressive regimes make thier sacrifices not made in vain.

**

So, you’re accusing me of racism for pointing out this sad irony but not mentioning any other deaths?
Zev Steinhardt

I’m going to really hope that gatopescado has miraculously managed to avoid that issue despite his post count and years here.

And while I usually try to supress my nitpicking nature: Aldebaran, you may want to learn how to spell the name of the people before criticizing them.

My heart goes out to the survivors, and especially her fiance. No killing is a good thing. I don’t support killing of anyone, Palestinian or Israeli. But I think there is a subtle difference of consent in participating in this “war”. As awful as it is that children throwing stones are killed (and it IS awful) they, to a certain extent, involved themselves in the conflict.

What, exactly, is the sad irony?

I said “report to the hospital” regarding Applebaum and that needs clarification. Dr. Applebaum was known for rapidly getting to the hospital to help whether he was on call or not. He apparently was widely admired by the staff for his dedication and humanity.

TeaElle, my first thought might have been like yours but in the son’s eye his father was fighting against homeland occupation by a substantially stronger agressor nation. You and I may not agree with his view and certainly not with his method but he didn’t have the luxury of our perspective. His father is responsible for the death of an honorable man and his young daughter. The father’s murderous actions directly resulted in the death of his son. Yet instead of remorse he’ll undoubtably only plan additional vengance.

I pity everyone except for the bombers over there so much. What a hellish existance to inhabit.

That he was a doctor dedicated to fighting terrorism (and became a victim of it) and that she’s being buried on what was to be her wedding day…

Zev Steinhardt

What, these two lives are less significant than the countless others snuufed out on a regular basis?

I detest this “logic” – as if because we cannot mourn equally for all, we should never mourn at all. As if the fact that a person feels one death more strongly, that means he doesn’t feel the other deaths in the slightest. As if mentioning one senseless tragedy means you are ignoring or minimizing other senseless tragedies. As if every tear shed must be dismissed as worthless, because in your opinion not enough tears have been shed.

ALDEBERAN is sorry it seems to him that Americans value some lives over others. I’m sorry he lacks the sensitivity or sense to realize not every expression of sorrow, dismay, or loss is a referendum on the feelings or values of Americans.

War and terrorism are a lot of things, but mostly they’re just very, very sad.

And yes, the lives of the people killed in Afghanistan are every bit as sad. It’s easy for us to say “Well, shucks, that was war and that’s not as bad as terrorism” but somehow I don’t think the relatives of the innocent people who die in war are quite as willing to draw a distinction between those deaths and other deaths. Their loved ones were just as innocent and they’re just as dead.

And either way it’s just as sad.

What, these two lives are less significant than the countless others snuufed out on a regular basis?

I detest this “logic” – as if because we cannot mourn equally for all, we should never mourn at all. As if the fact that a person feels one death more strongly, that means he doesn’t feel the other deaths in the slightest. As if mentioning one senseless tragedy means you are ignoring or minimizing other senseless tragedies. As if every tear shed must be dismissed as worthless, because in your opinion not enough tears have been shed.

ALDEBERAN is sorry it seems to him that Americans value some lives over others. I’m sorry he lacks the sensitivity or sense to realize not every expression of sorrow, dismay, or loss is a referendum on the feelings or values of Americans.

Zev,

No I don’t accuse you of anything.

I just point out that the death of these two victims of this ongoing senseless bloodshed are victims like others are.

And you try to keep your children inside when you live with a whole family in one single room… Where you ever in the occupied territories to see how things are overthere?

About weapons firing in the air: when you have as a government the arrogance to invade a sovereign nation, then do some homework and get informed about the local customs. It is typical for the arrogance displayed by the US government that they don’t even bothered to think about this.
And excuse me, but if I’m piloting a plane and I see some outdated rifles pointed in the air, I know they can’t hit my plane.

As for those people being not deliberately murdered: To me they are. By the invading army that obeys orders of the US government, which is where the real criminals reside very safely like true cowards.
There is no difference in killing someone on the street and killing someone while invading his sovereign nation.

As for your claim about “liberation”: I do hope that in reality you can see beyond that empty rethoric.
As for your claim that their “sacrifice” wasn’t “in vain”: Who are you to decide that no matter who should die = who are you to decide that people should be “sacrificed” without them asking for that “honour” and then conclude that they didn’t die “in vain”? What “vain” by the way?
If it is someone you love, are you going rejoicing on the street telling the world: Thank you USA, my loved one didn’t die “in vain”. He/she is only dead, who cares… ?
Did the Afghans and the Iraqis begged the USA to come over, invade their nation and kill them?

The sad story you bring here does have a right to be told. Yet it is in its drama and uselesness not different from all the other stories and all the other senseless death due to violence and hate, that occur daily worldwide.
Salaam. A

Are we not allowed to mourn two senseless deaths without you popping in with your anti-American agenda here, Aldebaran?

Sorry, but I think Aldebaran and RickJay have a point - you are trying to make this one death somehow sound more tragic than the countless other deaths before it. All the killing done on both sides is sad and ironic.