Fake Death Insurance Fraud

My wife and I took a young lady into our home. Her biological mother faked her death to her daughter, but not to the daughters grandmother, and their local friends and family.

The mother has recently upped using Facebook to post photoshopped/spliced photos to make it look like she and her daughter are spending time together. The photos include when the daughter bought her car, when she spent personal time with her aunt (who is now dead, assumed) but made to look like it was time with the mom, etc.

Insurance fraud of some sort is confirmed by the grandmother to the daughter. My wife and I simply do not know what type f fraud, how much danger the young lady is in, that we are in, etc. Apparently grandma is “dying” as well, as the mother claimed to be before faking her death.

Does anyone have any ideas what type of fraud has been done, and what my wife, the young lady, and myself are facing?

Since this is a real-life legal question, we prefer to put it in IMHO rather than General Questions. Moved.

samclem, moderator.

Thank you, moderator.

Where’s the insurance fraud exactly? Who collected on the insurance policy? The daughter? The grandmother?

Thank you for your interest. At this point, so many things we were told are circumspect. We have been having a meeting of the minds, my wife and I, trying o figure things out.

We know that insurance fraud was committed, but we do not know what kind. We believe either fake deaths or murders are involved along with insurance poliies. We also believe those responsible are trying to frame the daughter.

To expand a little…the mother “died” in February of 2017, around the time that an uncle “died.” But the uncle’s wife is now with the mother’s boyfriend, and grandma is involved, aware, etc. The story goes that the mother died of an overdose, while the boyfriend was present. The uncle committed suicide with a firearm. Shortly after both death stories were relayed to the daughter, the boyfriend and wife were a new couple, living with grandma.

Grandma is now out in our area, and the Facebook thing is all whacky with spiced photos, etc.

The simple answer is that the wife and the boyfriend shacked up, killed the uncle and the mom, committed insurance fraud, and grandma is either afraid to speak up, or made some money, too.

If that was the case, what is with the Facebook activity of the mom’s account? How can the daughter be implicated in insurance fraud with fake photos of her with her mom, who is presumed dead?

If the mom faked her death, then why post on facebook?

The facebook posting destroys any possibility of the criminals getting away at this point. If we can understand the connection, we can figure out what has happened. The methods and types of insurance fraud are beyond my wife and I as we do not live with a criminal mindset; these things are an enigma to us.

Sorry for the long post, thank you for your interest.

Assuming there’s actual evidence for these murders and/or insurance fraud, why hasn’t anyone contacted the police?

If no such evidence exists, why are you spreading vicious rumors?

The police been contacted by two different people - my wife and I, and the y lung lady in question. There is proof of fraud, and proof of a death, real or faked is the question. I’m just looking for some feedback.

I have a good friend who worked in the life insurance industry all his working life and we talked about this several times over the years. A few things I remember from these conversations.

To pay out :[ul][li]They want a body that is verified by the state authorities to be the deceased the policy is on. [/li][li]If no body then it goes to their investigation department that will work on its own and also share information with the local police to resolve this.[/li][li]There was only one instance he is aware of in his company (and he was in a position to know) in which payouts were made without a body and an investigation. That was 9-11.[/li][li]As for suspected insurance fraud his comment was. We have long memories, a lot of patience, and that investigation department. They take the long term view. He commented a couple years ago that Social Media is a big help to them. Seems people cannot stay off Facebook, Twitter, Etc. There is a deep mine there of information the average person has no idea they are giving up and they were beefing up that section for both policy acceptance and the fraud department.[/li][/ul]

I appreciate your insight. This helps put things into perspective. The initial tension from the WTF moment has worn off and from your words I think my wife is most likely correct - the mother, who has a history of doing mental bs to her daughter is doing it again. Helping a young lady through a grieving process for her mother who has abused her for the entirety of her life - and the daughter thinks she will never get closure, etc - only to have the psychopathic, racist, heroin addict make things worse…where is “stop resisting” when you need it most?

If you don’t know whom or if, anyone collected on Mom’s insurance policy, I’m not sure how you’re implying fraud.

Unless the daughter got a payout from the insurance company it’s highly unlikely she can be implicated in fraud. Did she? Or didn’t she? If she didn’t, why are you worried about her being implicated?

You seem reluctant to tell us who had the insurance policy and who collected on it. Without that info I don’t think any of us can really offer any useful advice.

Good Luck.

Maybe my reference of knowing there was fraud involved was too oblique. Basically, the grandmother told the daughter today that her mom was not dead, but alive, and that she committed insurance fraud with her boyfriend. A shock of all of us about still being alive.

The problem is the daughter has no verifiable proof of death or life, merely grandmas word. The daughter has not physically seen her mom since early 2016. She was too traumatized by the mom in life to feel strong enough to attend the funeral. The boyfriend (who shacked up with the just widowed aunt within weeks of the the respective deaths, aforementioned in a previous post) has a criminal record of threatening old people for their money and medication, fraud, etc.

So, with the two deaths and sudden relationship of now single partners, with grandma saying that the mom was still alive, with the Facebook account suddenly becoming active recently in weird ways (badly photoshopped pictures of past and present spliced together, such as a “recent” photo where the daughter and mom are together, only the daughter’s hair is much longer now (shoulder length now and not an A cut as it was a years ago), or the photo of the “same car” where one is of an aunt’s truck, the other of the daughter’s car (known through the different side view mirrors on passenger and driver’s side, etc), a photo of the daughter buying her car, which was taken by an aunt who is verifiably dead but someone ends up on the dead/not dead mothers facebook page as if she took the picture, etc.

To top it all off, there is grandma saying there was insurance fraud involved with the mom faking her death, who was dating a criminal with a legal history who was shacked up to the drug addict mom before he watched her die of a heroin overdose (so the story went, who knows now) and then moved in with grandma (perfect match, a drug addict with a criminal history of defrauding and bullying old people for money and medicine living with the elderly mother of the deceased mom and now shaking up with the sister/aunt…which is beyond a theory and guesstimating, but fact…assuming the mom is actually dead and not alive.

This is not slander, but the real life complexity of applying Occam’s razor to the interplay of an unknown number of uncontrolled multi-psychologies with competing, though sometimes complimentary interests (I do not envy law enforcement investigators).

To answer an unanswered question, we do not know who received any insurance fraud money. It could have been the grandma, but then again there is a known criminal among them. I could give you names, but that would be slander. The daughter, who lives with us as our own family and our own daughter, works as a home health aide (recently employed) and is not in possession of gazillions of dollars.

Odd thing is, the mom, an aunt, an uncle, a cousin, are all reported as dead, and now the grandma reports she has cancer, and will die in six months…but then says the mom is alive, thus effectively negating every death, potentially. These people are sick. Really, really sick.

“not in possessions of gazillions of dollars”

A highly eveasive answer to whether or not the daughter collected ANY money from the insurance policy. If she took no money, she committed no fraud. Period. If she got money, and has now learned it was all a fraud she needs to return it or face the consequences of being informed, by Gran, AND still keeping the cash. Which definitely makes her complicit in the crime, and open to prosecution.

If the Gran knows there was a fraud she must know who collected. If it was her, why is she telling? If she’s wanting to pass on funds, she got through fraud, to her grand daughter when she dies in 6 months, then yeah, the grand daughter is at risk if she takes those funds now aware there was a fraud perpetrated.

You seem to be purposely being unclear. How can anyone give you helpful answers if you’re unclear about so much?

Still wishing you Good Luck, regardless!

When you say that I am purposely being unclear, when I have told you the daughter received no money, you sound more than a little suspicious and paranoid.

Here, to make things simple:

Did Mary Schoenahl fake her death, or was she murdered? Did her boyfriend, William (or Bill, or Moose) Phillips help in either fakery or death? Who knows. The grandma Shirley Hardey did help, as she was the source of knowledge that the death that was not death, and the fraud that was unknown (zen rocks!) but was she threatened and bullied by the criminal experienced in elder extortion, Phillips, or was she a crafty co-schemer? And why is Mary Schoenahl’s facebook overactive now, if she is dead and if, as Shirley Hardy claims, insurance fraud is involved? If she is not afraid of being caught for fraud, then why would potential criminals such as Bill Phillips (a 7’ tall giant) work the Facebook account of the woman he murdered, as if he will not get caught? What if there was no murder, only wakeboarding on a wave crest of light being pulled by the expansion of the universe at almost 300,000,000 meters/second (which is why the universe is longer than light extends, and has part of itself in darkness).

I, Christopher Stormy Winter, wonder these things. This is my real name, which is not my name, but it is real, and a name that is. I like zen. I can’t stand Matushaka Suzan or Bishop George of Australia, as they are my personal life bullies. I can make a good frittata. I fart. A lot. I currently have dick-do disease, but my wife has not left me (poor thing). I am a registered monarchist.

If you need more detail, let me know.

:dubious:

Saying ‘she doesn’t have gazillions’, is NOT the same as saying, ‘she got no money’, so maybe you should be clearer and people won’t appear suspicious for trying to get the details necessary to offer you reasonable advice.

You think there was insurance fraud without knowing who, or even if, anyone collected any money. And you have a Grandmother telling you there was fraud, but again, has no actual details about who got the money!

Also, if the Mom IS still alive that somehow magically nullifies a bunch of other deaths in the family how exactly? That makes no sense at all.

If the daughter took no money, then please explain why you feel she can be implicated in any insurance fraud the mother may have committed. The mother, Gran, new boyfriend and anyone else who knew the death was faked are pretty clearly all aparty to the fraud. (IF it actually happened!) That affects you, or the daughter, not at all unless y’all took money knowing it was a faked death.

You can get a $5k life insurance policy, not enough for “gazillions”, plenty enough for fraud.

Ahhhhh yeah!

Sounds like the premise for a new AMC series. You should definitely pitch this story to them.

Sounds like someone got tired of the “game”.