Help me make fun of British food!

I know this seems like it should be easy enough.
What I need is a single word to use as a punchline- a specific food item. It has to be funny to a U.S. audience so it should be something that is thought of as British and uncommon in the U.S. but it can’t be unheard of. It should be something that we are familiar with from British T.V. and movies. It also has to be a funny sounding word.
I’m thinking my best bets are marmite or kipper.
Kipper is a good funny sounding word- it makes for a good punchline but I don’t know if it’s British enough.

I know haggis is Scottish – is that geographically close enough?

:rolleyes: Yeah, just like Ohio is geographically close to the U.S.

This will be a general U.K. reference so haggis is not out of the question but it is a little too Scottish-specific. If it’s interpreted as a Scottish joke it won’t work.

Marshmallows on sweet potato pie is the funniest food thing I ever heard…oh wait that’s American.

That said, how can you go past toad-in-hole?

There’s always spotted dick…

…recipe .here

By “toad-in-hole”, calm kiwi, am I to assume you mean bread with the center replaced by a fried egg? Because that’s one of the yummiest things ever and it is fairly common in the US.

Yes it is yummy. But that doesn’t stop it sounding odd does it? And it is British.

Nope, “toad in the hole” is sausages cooked in a Yorkshire pudding batter. Yummy!

Toad in the hole recipe

http://www.steakandkidneypudding.com/meat/toad-in-the-hole.html

Can I ask why you want to make fun of British food ?

Well, isn’t that interesting! Here in the US, a toad in the hole is a slice of bread with the middle cut out of it and an egg in the hole, all fried in butter. But yours sounds good too.

And you’re right, calm kiwi, it does sound odd. I just misread the OP and thought we were talking about non-yummy food.

skeptic_ev writes:

> Well, isn’t that interesting! Here in the US, a toad in the hole is
> a slice of bread with the middle cut out of it and an egg in the
> hole, all fried in butter. But yours sounds good too.

In some parts of the U.S., perhaps. I suspect that the item you describe is unknown to most Americans.

British food is better than it used to be. My parents both moved to Canada from there.

I grew up eating this stuff and occasionally crave it (shudder).

  • Spotted dick and toad-in-the-hole have been mentioned.

  • Steak and kidney pie

  • Yorkshire pudding

  • Melton Mowbray

  • Lancashire hot pot

  • Cornish pastie

  • Fish and chips

  • Scones with clotted cream (drool)

English often eat curry after a night of drinking (yum)
I was horrified to hear my cousins refer to the Chinese food often available from fish and chip shops as “Chinky Chuck”, and said so, but this is commonly used.

The nice thing about the British is that they’re easy to cook for. On the one hand, they don’t have high expectations. And if worse comes to worse, you can throw whatever you have available into a curry and they’ll love it.

“Britain, the land of seventeen religions and two sauces.”

As a teenager, I went to an English boarding school, which was called a public school even though it was private.

Every morning for breakfast they served deep-fried bread (toast?) and marmalade. It was a greasarama, we were all covered in zits.

I’m surprised this thread hasn’t made it this far without a mention of Mr. Brain’s Faggots.

Blimey. Old stereotypes die hard, don’t they?

Believe me, there’s plenty more things you can take the piss out of us Brits for (haven’t you seen our TV? our music charts? our standards of customer service?), but the tired old jokes about the food are neither accurate nor funny anymore.

Yeah, I know, I’m opening myself up to criticisms of being humourless here. But is it still that funny to you lot?

Jellied eels, anyone? Bleah.