How did they allow the character name Pussy Galore in 1964?

I wonder how that made it past the studio censors into the final movie.

(I know that was her name in the novel as well)

My bolding suggests what I would suspect. But I don’t know that for sure. I do seem to recall other racier names in movies before then, but none spring to mind at the moment.

There’s a lot more backstory in the novel about how she got her name, but in real life the newspapers reported that Honor Blackman had been cast as Pussy Galore for the movie, and since no one collapsed from shock at the announcement, the producers and censors decided there was just enough double-entendre to let it go.

She was a lesbian in the book, I guess no way that was going to get by the censors.

According to Kiss, Kiss, Bang, Bang, a history of Bond films that was current up to Pierce Brosnan’s, UA did indeed try to pressure the producers into changing the name to Kitty Galore, but Broccoli and Salzman had already made sure to get enough footage into the can to foil their efforts. IIRC, some publicity materials using the name Kitty were actually printed up but not distributed (or distributed only in limited quantity).

It was hinted at in the movie when she told Bond to save his charms (“I’m immune!”) and Bond quipped “I must have appealed to her maternal instincts” when asked why she notified Washington about Operation Grand Slam.

Apparently in promotional material for the American market, the character was referred to as “Miss Galore” or “Goldfinger’s personal pilot”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldfinger_(film)#Promotion

Why, whatever do you mean, sir?

If you see something objectionable in the name, you must have a dirty mind.

:wink:

I thought referring to “pussy cats” was taken at face value once upon a time and then at some point it began a slow decline as the perverted use grew in favor. I don’t know where 1964 falls on that line though. Similar to “having a gay old time” or referring to someone as a “gay fellow.”

A character of that name appeared decades later in the Cats & Dogs movie franchise. It all came full circle when Jeopardy! used her name as an answer in the “Movie Titles” category:

L’il Abner got away with Appassionata von Climax in 1960 (in the strip, on Broadway, and in the movie).

I’m still amazed Beaver Cleaver was a thing.

This was my assumption… I mean, we had Josie and the Pussycats in the 60s/70s, and that was a children’s comic book/cartoon title. Nowadays, the term “pussycat” garners an eyebrow raise, especially in connection with a human woman.

I think a lot of Americans are unaware of the phenomenon of words being viewed as far harsher here in the States than in the UK. Pussy, piss, bastard, and shit come to mind as words that are vulgar in the UK but obscene in the US.

Reported… to the FBI, NSA and even the PTA.

Exactly.

There are still Gaytime icecream cones (for home use) sold here and they are an innocent memory from my childhood. http://shop.countdown.co.nz/Shop/ProductDetails?Stockcode=273822&name=gaytime-cones-super

I normally ask where pussy is, meaning my pussycat (a large Maine Coon) although my teenadult children cringe.

Pussy Galore and Pussy Riot evokes a slight smirk at most but usually no reaction at all here.

Mind you the OP asks this from a country where grown men are called Randy without blanching and patting someones fanny is amusing. Try that here and you’ll be on the deck or in a police station answering awkward questions. :smiley:

how about Plenty O’Toole?

That’s OK. She’s named after her father.

Dirty Dingus Magee (1970) probably took advantage of the trend that Goldfinger had established. :wink:

You’re ninja’d, IYKWIM.