How do I become a citizen of Brazil?

I am an American living in the mid-west and I am married to a Brazilian citizen. How do I become a Brazilian citizen and what are the requirements in Brazil to become a citizen? Is this something that I can do at the Consulate General of Brazil in Houston? When I search the internet for information I get a bunch of “get a 2nd passport, live tax free, start an offshore company” websites.

Yes.

http://www.brazilhouston.org/ingles/jurisdic.htm

Send them an e-mail.

Be careful, you will be giving up your American Citizenship!

I meant to say also that the USA doesn’t support dual citizenship.

I don’t think you actually lose US citizenship… but check it out. To live in Brazil you don’t need to be a brazilian citizen either… being married to one seems enough.

Well if you do become a Brazilian welcome !

From what little information I have been able to find about the subject, the US does not recognize the 2nd citizenship. As far as they care I will only be a US citizen. Brazil does not recognize duel citizenships, but it does not require that the US citizenship be given up to become a citizen of Brazil. This means that I will be a Brazilian citizen in Brazil and a citizen of the US in the US. Is this the correct understanding?

Thanks Duck Duck Goose for the link.

Reasons for losing ones citizenship:

http://www.richw.org/dualcit/law.html

[QUOTE]
Loss of citizenship (INA § 349, 8 USC § 1481)
Section 349 of the INA [8 USC § 1481] specifies several conditions under which US citizenship may be lost. These include:

becoming a naturalized citizen of another country, or declaring allegiance to another country, after reaching age 18;

serving as an officer in a foreign country’s military service, or serving in the armed forces of a country which is engaged in hostilities against the US;

working for a foreign government (e.g., in political office or as a civil servant);

formally renouncing one’s US citizenship before duly authorized US officials; or

committing treason against, or attempting or conspiring to overthrow the government of, the US.

[QUOTE]

in 1990 the law changed. I have no desire to give up my US citizenship.

"U.S. citizens are subject to loss of citizenship if they perform certain acts voluntarily and with the intention to relinquish U.S. citizenship.
From http://www.richw.org/dualcit/policies.html#infodual

“Notice the emphasis on keeping US citizenship following foreign naturalization or the taking of a foreign oath of allegiance. This represents a near-total reversal of earlier policies which assumed such actions were strongly indicative of a desire to give up US citizenship.”

It seems to be a gray area. My wife is Colombian and has a naturalized citizenship for the USA. Colombia recognizes dual citizenship, but the US doesn’t recognized her citizenship as a Colombian National. When we travel, she must use her US Passport to enter the US. When going to Colombia, she can use either passports but prefers to use her Colombian passport.

My wife has both a US and Brazilian passport. She uses Brazil passport to get into Brazil and the US to get into the US, like your wife. The whole reason I asked this question was because I want to do what my wife does. Right now when we get to a Brazil airport, she goes in a quick moving line for Brazilians and I get stuck in a long line only to be given the 3rd degree when I reach the front of the line. I want to have a Brazilian passport so that I can go in the quick lines too. :smiley:

Do you use a tourist visa to get into Brazil? If you got a business visa, would that speed things up? It’s bad for business to make businessmen wait in line, I’d think.

http://travel.state.gov/foreignentryreqs.html

good idea, I will look into the types of visas that I can have.

Great information and ideas from all of you!

I have a resident visa for Colombia and I live here permanently. I can leave the country for up to 2 years and not lose my residency. Even though I enter Colombia with my US Passport, having a resident visa speeds things up a lot. Perhaps if you want to live in Brazil, you should look into a resident visa.