How in the world am I supposed to tell a good avacado from a bad one?

I bought two avacados at the store the other day. By the time they were eaten, both were slightly yielding and a nice, even black color.

The first avacado was lovely.

The second avacado could have been a pile of crap in a leather purse - full of brown spots and those gross little strings.

Since both avacados felt and looked exactly the same, how in the hell am I supposed to know which avacados are good and which are bad? Is there some sort of smell you are supposed to watch out for or something? maybe thump a certain part of the avacado like you are supposed to do with canteloupes?

Also, what is up with those little stringy bits that invade the bad avacados? What are they for?

I’ve never seen a bad avocado, other than just over-ripe, so I don’t really know. I know that there is at least one type of avocado that is supposed to be stringy though so maybe you had one of those that were mixed into the bin? I usually look for even color, somewhat soft, and no breaks at all on the skin.

Yeah, see, that is exactly what I’ve been looking for - kind of soft, even color, no breaks in the skin, but I invariably end up with some great avacados and some really bad ones.

I think the bad ones are overripe, but since they are always identical to the just right ripe ones, how am i supposed to tell them apart?

The stringy, nasty avacado and the creamy, green one looked EXACTLY the same. There are usually two types of avacado, but the one type is a really weird green color, so I know that I never end up picking one of those.

May I call you Sneeze?

There ya go:

http://www.avocado.org/faq.shtml

(You can thank me later.)

I usually give 'em a good roll down the aisle. If it fades left, not quite ready, fades right, too ripe. If it is a straight roller, you have found the perfect avacado.

I have a yard customer who had me tend a yard in a house she rented out. One avocado was growing on a tree in the back yard, and she let me take it. I let it sit on the dining room table at home, until it got ripe.
My Mom asked me, “Where did you get this rock?” :smiley:
Unfortunately, as soon as it got softer it started to rot. :frowning:

omni-not, thank you for the avacado link - i’m now to the point where “avacado” just sounds weird and vaguely sinister, but in a good way : )

I think that everybody’s been discussing the Hass variety - the ones that are very very dark green and pebbled on the outside. I don’t know what the other ones that you see in supermarkets are called, but they have thin shiny green skins and tend to be significantly larger than Hass avocados. You can tell when these are ripe if you shake them gently and feel the pit moving around inside the center cavity.

there are BAD avacados? I’ve yet to see one :slight_smile: