How Long After Giving Birth Can You Get Pregnant Again?

Just wondering, I was reading about a lady and this was in the late 1700s in Boston and it says the 17 year old girl got married and in 5 years gave birth to 6 children in six successive births. (In other words no twins). Assuming 9 months per birth

9 X 6 = 54 months

5 years is 5 X 12 = 60 months

So it does seem to be possible.

I was wondering, assuming everything is fine with each birth, and I know it varies from woman to woman, but assuming 100% health of the mother, and healthy babies, how long does it take for the woman to, for lack of a better word, reset so she can give birth again.

So if she gave birth on December 1, 2008, at what point would she be physically able to get pregnant again?

And I don’t mean any twins or multiple births in there

Thanks

I knew someone who went for their 6-week postnatal exam and was told “guess what - you’re pregnant!”

I had a menstrual period 6 weeks after I gave birth, as did one of the other new moms in my baby group.

These are only anecdotes, but they suggest that the answer is “for some women, probably within weeks.”

Typically, about 6-8 weeks. Atypically, about 2 weeks.

In horses, a “foal heat” is very common…a mare will go into season about 2-3 weeks after foaling. Considering a mare is pregnant 11 months, that’s a stunning turnaround.

And CairoCarol, if I went to my 6-week postnatal exam to be told I was pregnant, I would keel over. GAH.

In my genealogy research, which includes a lot of Irish Catholic families, I found a lot of families having a child every year, for a total of 8, 9, 10, 11+ kids. This was usually in the 1700s and 1800s. So in these cases women were continually able to get pregnant within 3 months of birth.

And the slang for it is Irish Twins. I grew up hearing this term. Don’t know how widespread it is.

I have an 11 month younger sister. We’ve been called “Irish Twins” all our lives, which is OK as we’re part Irish with very Irish-sounding names.:stuck_out_tongue:

I had classmates who were 10 months apart, both born in the same year, and the second one was a 9-monther. Yes, their mom was very surprised when she discovered why her periods weren’t returning, why do you ask?

But what happened to that hormonal protection against pregnancy that breastfeeding is supposed to give for about a year? Does that kick in only some weeks after birth? Not very effective?

I remember when my cousin was still breastfeeding her first child, & she said something to the effect of, “I started ovulating again.” She was trying to start him on some solid foods, but he was still a little thing.

Long enough ago, I can’t tell you the baby’s age. Just a few months, anyway.

“Not very effective.” New mothers are warned against assuming that breastfeeding protects against pregnancy. It may lower the pregnancies overall in a population, but for the individual, it is an unreliable means of birth control.

No, foal heat is even sooner – 9-11 days after giving birth. The next regular heat cycle is about 30 days after foaling. (Which, given an 11-month gestation period, means the mare foals about the same date every year. A survival advantage for a prey animal living on prairie grasslands.)

Breeding on foal heat is somewhat rare in wild horses. Mares are concentrating on their foal and not real receptive to the stallion.

But human breeders take advantage of it when they want to move the next foal’s birth date earlier in the year. By breeding the mare on the foal heat, you can move next years foal about 3 weeks earlier in the year.

Markxxx writes:

> Just wondering, I was reading about a lady and this was in the late 1700s in
> Boston and it says the 17 year old girl got married and in 5 years gave birth to 6
> children in six successive births. (In other words no twins). Assuming 9 months
> per birth
>
> 9 X 6 = 54 months
>
> 5 years is 5 X 12 = 60 months

I suspect you’re calculating this the wrong way. It’s hard to be sure, but the five years was probably measured from the birth of the first child to the birth of the sixth child. (She may well have been pregnant when she was married, and, yes, that was common back then.) So she was pregnant forty-five of the sixty months, so she became pregnant about three months after each of the first five pregnancies.