How's Macron doing as President of France?

Not too well early on, it looks like: http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/25/news/economy/emmanuel-macron-france-makeup/index.html

Having seen off the Marie Le Pen and the populist Right to become President, he now has a challenge from the Left in the form of the Labour Unions.

There are some big demonstrations planned against his Labour reforms and the Unions will be on the streets demonstrating in September. France has a very rigid labour market, which is fine if you have a job, there is a lot of job protection. However, if you are young, there is a lot of unemployment.

From a UK point of view, this will be interesting. We had that fight in the 1980s, during the Thatcher years, which pretty much destroyed the political power of the labour unions. But it took years and it caused a lot of bitterness. In France, the labour unions are still strong and are closely connected with the socialist party (which is falling apart.)

Macron has a huge majority and a new party and a mandate to reform France. He will have a big fight on his hands and it will take some skill to steer a course. The Left hates him because he used to be a banker and Right hate him because he is sympathetic to immigration and has liberal inclusive policies.

He is, however, a new broom and he seems a pretty determined leader with a new party. Whether he retains the support of the French electorate is another matter. There is widespread suspicion of the political class in France, it will be interesting to see what the reaction is to his political programme. The French economy needs reform, but there are lots of vested interests that don’t want change.

There are some big demonstrations by the Unions planned on 12th and 23rd September protesting against changes to labour laws.

That will be a test of his resolve, but he risks looking too authoritarian if there is violence on the streets.

What a misleading, fake newsy article. A make up artist submitted a bill for 30k. Macron did not join Avon. It’s still somewhat concerning, but a 2/10 on the scandal scale.

I couldn’t say, but Macron’s a shifty little soul with a meant to be engaging smile, but as a thatcherite rascal, like Trump — whom he seemed to find an avuncular soulmate during the recent visit — his main qualification was the never-ending awfulness of his opponent.
Which — ditto — does not imply good governance. Least of all since he plans on changing the work culture that works well enough for France.

Just another capitalist right-wing blowhard.

France has high unemployment of around 10% and particularly high for young people at around 25%. Also, those in work often find themselves in low paid, work and find it difficult to progress in their careers.

However, if you are in work and settled in a career, you have lots of job protection, a 35 hour week, lots of holidays and early retirement, especially if you are in the bloated public sector. If you have such a job, you will fight to keep it and the labour unions can count on a lot of support from their members and the Left in France and especially supporters of his rival for the presidency Mélenchon.

This lack of flexibility in the labour market makes the French economy perform poorly and previous leaders have caved in under pressure when they tried to make any changes.

French productivity is about the same as America’s, and staggeringly enough, better than the economic miracle wrought in Osborne’s Britain.

Current price GDP per hour worked
On this basis, UK productivity in 2015 was:

above that of Japan by 10.6%
above that of Canada by 1.2%
lower than that of Italy by 10.5%
lower than that of the US by 22.2%
lower than that of France by 22.7%
lower than that of Germany by 26.7%
lower than that of the rest of the G7 by 15.9%

Office for National Statistics ( GB ) https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/economicoutputandproductivity/productivitymeasures/bulletins/internationalcomparisonsofproductivityfinalestimates/2015

Some associate the French superiority to their habit of not working like demented little slave-dwarves as in Amerika:

HuffPo Why the French Are More Productive Than Americans
However, since Macron has looked over the Channel and seen how well Austerity is working, he is looking to cut housing benefit in emulation of how well that works here.

All the more make-up for him.

What a strange bizarre hard left knee jerking…

(the idea that Trump is a thatcherite is very bizarre in itself).

Of course Macron would look ‘right wing’ from the perspective perhaps of the extreme left, but he is in fact a centrist.

This is extremely superifical and naive attempt at analysis spinning. The challenges identified for the France since the past two administrations are not the productivity by hours, but the decades of the elevated unemployement rates with the long-term prolonged unemployment and under employment and the rigidities of the combined labor and education systems.

The problem of the two tier work forces and opportunities, and the drag on the french potential is a problem that is widely acknowledged by both the center left and the center right.

The economic system reforms that the Macron government has cited are based on the continental examples, of the Nordic reforms and of the German reforms, not your English models. It is clear in your comments you are merely knee jerking from the gazing at your own self and your pre formed ideological prejudice-based view.

Of course the various semi austerity budgets and approaches have been in place since the Hollande government, so the paragraph is more nonsensical.

So in other words, he’s classic Third Way, which means he has no constituency among the major political groups, but plenty of financial support from business and plenty of voter support from the broad middle class.

But if the voters don’t stick with that type of President, he has no political capital whatsoever.

It’s almost as if handing the keys to the country to an Oedipus complex having neophyte is a bad idea. Simply not being an actual Nazi is not enough.

The challengs of the Macron effort for reform is going against the sacred cows of the regulation of the labor markets that not one government since Mitterand has had great success in reforming from the entrenched intrinsageance. Everyone knows - except the Communists who solve all problems by taxing the capital - there is the need for the reform and agree it is a priority but no one wants their reserved corner to be touched…

in the face of this, there is no scenario where the President remains popular in the short term, the moment the action or the preparations for the action begin, the sacred cows are gored.

This is completely unsurprising and to make specific comments on Macron is losing sight of the structural challenge.

The real test for the government of Macron is working through the reform period on the face of the compeltely inevitable fall in the popularity and being savvy to hold together and not give up in the face of the opposiiton as so many governments have to the great loss of face.

Communistes and the various hard left fractions more than the PS, for those syndicats that are the “strongest” in the mobilization for the street demonstrations and the hard strikes. These are the core actions that have in the past broken the back of the reforms efforts.

Updating this thread from a year ago, when from the OP’s URL:

Well it has plummeted some more and there are massive riots (maybe the worst since 1968)

It’s beginning to look like Christmas in Paris would be inadvisable this year.

Too bad. He started off with such promise - don’t know if he has the political skills to recover from this trough.

That’s the problem of being a centrist in today’s world - you’ll do something to piss off everyone and they don’t care how many things you’re doing that they approve of.