"I am not anti-guns. I am anti-bullet holes in my patients."

I just heard this quote, via Twitter, on NBC News. I totally agree. It was in response to the NRA asshats saying something stupid about ER doctors.

I also wish I could reach through the TV and hug the mother of that Greek guy who survived the Las Vegas shooting only to die here, the one who said, “I don’t want any more prayers, and no more guns!” Get her together with Emma Gonzalez, and I bet they could get something done.

#me too.

Here’s what other doctors are saying on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/hashtag/thisisourlane?ref_src=twsrc^google|twcamp^serp|twgr^hashtag

I once heard someone say “I approve of blood, just not people wearing it.”

While this wasn’t the point of the thread, Billy Graham once said something like, “Of course sex is a good thing! I’m here because of it.”

The tweet I slightly misquoted in my OP was in response to the NRA telling ER doctors to “stay in your lane” and they are replying that this IS their lane. :smack:

A good person who just got shot would not surprise me by saying this.

Am ER doctor wanting the gun control that only affects or effects honest law abiding citizens who says that about the next patient, a criminal who just killed a few kids in a convenience store hold-up, has no idea what the problem is. NRA is not the problem.

IMHO

So, you support extensive background checks to ensure that the buyer of a gun is a law abiding person? And gun registry so that if this law abiding person becomes not law abiding, his guns can be removed to make the rest of us safe?

Remember, the Las Vegas shooter was a law abiding person until he started killing.

I thought I recalled that he had illegal ammo,(I could be wrong) if so he was not a law abiding citizen prior to the shooting. Of course for al practical
purposes it doesn’t matter

I still think that most doctors, police officers, EMTs, etc. are opposed to bullet holes in people, regardless of their views on gun control.

Working in the ER made me a gun control advocate. I still own a rifle and a pistol but I haven’t touched them in over 10 years. I won’t until I get rid of them.

I wish I was a better writer…

The ratio of “good gun use” to bad gun use is like 10 to 1 in my experience. I would like the NRA to come into my ER after a cop has been shot in the face or a child has shot their sibling. The NRA used to be about hunting, not so much anymore.

As the kids are down in the morgue with bullet holes in them, the doctor still does know what the problem is.

By any measure firearms are a public health issue.
In 2014 there were 6,271 deaths due to AIDS.
In the same year, there were 12,979 firearm related homicides and 22,018 firearm related suicides.

The only difference being there is no pro-AIDS lobby. The NRA can be grouped with the anti-vaxxers in this regard.

You’re in the same position as a tow-truck driver or auto mechanic: all they see are broken down cars, so they assume that the world is full of nothing but broken down cars. Not to negate your “10 to 1” ratio; it is, after all, your experience.

But considering your place of work, it is not necessarily reflective of reality.

posted in error

Right, and his experience is dealing with the consequences of living in a society awash in guns.

If you have a different line of work, you are more shielded from seeing those consequences, and so your experience of reality is naive of the harms caused by complete lack of effective gun control.

Doctors and other medical professionals accidentally kill 250,000 people per year, a preventable problem. I don’t think Johns Hopkins has any particular bias.

Where I work just means I see the people that aren’t immediately killed. I see the wounded. Unless it is a child, EMS never wants to call that in the field.

I see the hunting accidents, the gun cleaning accidents, the target shooting accidents, the child found a gun a accidents, the drunk playing with his gun accidents. I also see the people shot on purpose. The attempted murders, the criminals shot by cops, and yes, the criminals shot by homeowners. Bad to good is around 10 to 1. That doesn’t take into account the bad guys that that wouldn’t have been shot if they didn’t have a gun.

You are aware that random gun murders have become so common in the US, that you can survive one, only to be killed in another 100’s of miles away?

People (the NRA) blame it on video games, movies and television, or a lack of religion. That’s BS and everyone knows it. The reason the US has so many deaths is because we have so many guns. Period.
Supporting the NRA agenda is like watching 10 people drown so that one person learns to swim.

I wouldn’t use a coincidence as proof of anything, that’s like saying atomic bombings are incredibly common because people survived one only to die in another.

I’m waiting for some of the pro-gun people to start blaming these things on MTV, the way they did in the 80s and 90s.

Earlier today, I said on another board that what we really need is an armed person to storm into the NRA headquarters and start firing, although I personally don’t want anyone shot. Chances are, a lot of the people employed by them “just work there”. I was told more than once that this would probably enhance their power. :dubious:

I have also wondered how long it would take to get some kind of reasonable, ENFORCED gun control if we had single-payer health care, and TPTB would see just how much this costs in dollar values, never mind the intangible losses.

OK, you know what is the thing about this whole thing that riles me? The NRA telling the doctors to “stay in your lane”. Are they saying that unless you are a firearms/security professional not only may your opinion be dismissed, but that you should just shut up and keep it to yourself? No way! The doctors are citizens, they have all the right to have opinions based on their observations and knowledge and express and advocate for them publicly. It’s the legislators who get to either pay attention or not.

That fits right along with the apparent “well, nothing you can do, if people suffer it’s an unfortunate consequence of freedom” position that the Right seems to take on a bunch of issues including not just guns but health care itself, climate change, poverty, etc.